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On the Street in NYC....At the Flea Market

post #1 of 19
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post #2 of 19
I like that rug. Do you have a price?
post #3 of 19
I like the rug also.

He looks well put together.

Does anyone else notice color? Color of clothing and complexion?

I bought a book recently on dressing for your skin color and it looks like it would make a huge difference. I don't think brown matches this man's skin tone.

I am not trying to be critical or picky, but I wonder if anyone else notices this or takes time when buying clothes to match their own complexion?
post #4 of 19
He looks good.

I actually think that those colors are perfect for him; moreover, he looks put together from head to toe without looking studied about it.
post #5 of 19
The rug's not my style.

Certainly no one can't deny that some colors look better on one person that another. My rule of thumb is fair skin/cool colors and darker skin/warm colors, but that's a broad generalization with lots of exceptions, and not founded on anything other than my own personal taste.

I think the brown is a little warm for this guy's coloring, but the pale blue scarf acts as a good buffer (not to mention adds another dimension of color.) I like it.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
Does anyone else notice color? Color of clothing and complexion? I bought a book recently on dressing for your skin color and it looks like it would make a huge difference. I don't think brown matches this man's skin tone.
What book are you referring to? I'd be curious to take a look. I have a similar skin tone to that fellow (fairly pale skin, lighter hair) and would be interested to know what colors folks think are best. The Alan Flusser recs would not exclude brown, but I'd be interested to hear what you are seeing. This isn't one of those 'seasons' books (winter, spring, autumn, etc), is it?
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by operationexpat
The rug's not my style.

Certainly no one can't deny that some colors look better on one person that another. My rule of thumb is fair skin/cool colors and darker skin/warm colors, but that's a broad generalization with lots of exceptions, and not founded on anything other than my own personal taste.

That sounds like a good generalization and seems to be true for the most part.

Quote:
I think the brown is a little warm for this guy's coloring, but the pale blue scarf acts as a good buffer (not to mention adds another dimension of color.) I like it.

I think you're right. For his color, I think he is a "spring". Spring (complexion) calls for lighter brown, medium golden brown, golden tan, or chocolate brown. His browns seem to make his face red.

By the way, I am not saying he doesn't look good. (For anyone that thinks that)

Once again, I am not an expert with color, just bought a book about it and trying to apply what I am learning.
post #8 of 19
Good assessment Sara.

I'm clueless when it comes to colors and skin tones. Taking the advice off of Andy's page about seasons, I come in between a winter and an autumn...which have diametrically opposed color recommendations. Winters: no brown, autumns: lots of brown. So I say screw it and go with colors that work well together and forget skin tone.

Tom
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duveen
What book are you referring to? I'd be curious to take a look. I have a similar skin tone to that fellow (fairly pale skin, lighter hair) and would be interested to know what colors folks think are best. The Alan Flusser recs would not exclude brown, but I'd be interested to hear what you are seeing.

This isn't one of those 'seasons' books (winter, spring, autumn, etc), is it?

HAHA! Yeah it does combine men's colors into seasons but that is not all. It is called, "Color for Men" by Carole Jackson. It is very old (1984) but, amazingly, all of the info in it is very good. No fashion just style... It reminds me of Flusser's book though not quite as complete in history - and not nearly as beautiful. All of the info is standard menswear stuff. It has pics (like Flusser's book) of many different men with all skin tones and matches up the complexion with clothing colors. It is amazing the difference it makes!

She also has the usual dressing stuff - collars matching face shapes, sunglasses and face shapes, styles of clothing and body shapes, how to fit clothes to your body, how to start and maintain a wardrobe.

The book is out of print but I got it off of Amazon for about $3 ($7 after shipping)

I just looked on the author's website and one can actually get a hand size color chart to take with you when shopping to make sure one is buying the right colors.

Edit: I read some negativity about Flusser's book. Some were accusing him of doctoring his pics with Photoshop. I am not sure they had Photoshop in 1984 when this book was printed. There are lots of pics to prove her points.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
I like the rug also.

He looks well put together.

Does anyone else notice color? Color of clothing and complexion?

I bought a book recently on dressing for your skin color and it looks like it would make a huge difference. I don't think brown matches this man's skin tone.

I am not trying to be critical or picky, but I wonder if anyone else notices this or takes time when buying clothes to match their own complexion?

I consider my skin color when purchasing clothes and having a "perma-tan" (I'm hispanic) gives me a lot of leeway with colors. I find that bold, bright colors (think Turnbull & Asser) work well with me as do more muted, softer tones. I think that I can pretty much wear anything, although others might disagree, except the white shirt/navy suit combo. Also, I've never been able to pull off the NYC all black look.
post #11 of 19
Nicely put together. Colors are very 'comforting' and it's nice to see an older guy wearing Cons. Scarf compliments his outfit perfectly. Sartorialist has been finding some really good subjects recently.
post #12 of 19
I don't know anything about this spring/summer/fall/winter stuff, but maybe it's worth checking out. Everything I know was ingrained in my subconscious from shopping with my mother when I was five years old. She wouldn't let me wear pink because it didn't look good on me. Some might think that's harsh, but it sure helped me learn about colors!

Another thing to consider is that there are different hues of the same color. There are warmer browns (like the coat in the photo) and cooler browns (chocolate, or gray-browns.) Same goes most other colors. The trick is finding the hue that looks the best on you.

Sara

PS: After having said all that, I'm fair skinned with reddish hair (should wear blues and greens) and red is my favorite clothing color. So like all "rules," sometimes they're better ditched.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by operationexpat
Another thing to consider is that there are different hues of the same color. There are warmer browns (like the coat in the photo) and cooler browns (chocolate, or gray-browns.) Same goes most other colors. The trick is finding the hue that looks the best on you.

That is one of the points I just read about color. An "Autumn" skin tone can wear the same colors as a "Spring" but one must choose different tones, shades, and intensities.


I wonder what the % is of men actually think about this stuff?
post #14 of 19
I'll probably get a lot of flak for saying it, but I don't think most men see color the same way that most women do. Something about pin-point vision when trying to kill a saber-tooth instead of seeing the big picture in all it's chromatic glory...

Sara
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by operationexpat
I'll probably get a lot of flak for saying it, but I don't think most men see color the same way that most women do. Something about pin-point vision when trying to kill a saber-tooth instead of seeing the big picture in all it's chromatic glory...

I'll ask my fiancee (who's getting her PhD in Psychology), but I thought I remembered hearing that this was actually an established phenomenon. Not that either gender can't learn to see things a little differently when necessary, of course.
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