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How long are cedar shoe trees good for? - Page 2

post #16 of 29
So if the cedar doesn't really absorb any moisture, then plastic shoe trees should work just as well? You guys just saved me $$$!
post #17 of 29
I don't think moths lay their eggs in leather shoes, do they?
post #18 of 29
[quote=Cary Grant;2281194]As has been discussed here in the past, shoe trees do not absorb moisture (not enough to matter), contrary to popular belief and even marketing. Their purpose is simply to help retain/protect the shape of the shoe.

This is incorrect. Cedar wood shoe trees, for example, do absorb moisture from the shoe. The better shoes trees (think Edward Green) have a hole within the shoe tree designed to funnel out warm air and condensation. They are also made to fit the last of the respective shoe, so they do everthing doubly well (e.g. better shape retention, less creasing).
post #19 of 29
Sanding the trees will refresh the cedar scent and keep moths from attacking your shoes.

If you don't have a moth problem, the trees will do fine for your lifetime without any attention at all.
post #20 of 29
If the wood takes in moisture then what? Think for a moment. It either become full of water and starts growing roots or it release the water back into the air. But since the things are in your shoes that would be like leaving your sweaty feet in the shoe. Pretty easy to figure out how much mositure. Weigh the thing before and after. Water is 1kg per litre.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicola View Post
If the wood takes in moisture then what?

Think for a moment. It either become full of water and starts growing roots or it release the water back into the air. But since the things are in your shoes that would be like leaving your sweaty feet in the shoe.

Pretty easy to figure out how much mositure. Weigh the thing before and after. Water is 1kg per litre.

We are not talking about sweat pouring out of the leather of the shoes. i'm sure we are talking about very modest amounts of perspiration being somewhat absorbed by the trees. and the trees and leather probably achieve some sort of osmotic balance. as far as releasing into the air, that would happen when you remove the trees to wear the shoes - you do remove trees before wearing your shoes right? if not, since we're not talking buckets of perspiration moisture, it dries out on its own after a day or two.
post #22 of 29
Around here all winter the air is much more humid then I am . Any wood that isn't sealed will swell. When I lived in Canada with forced air heating the opposite happened. Wood dried out all winter and swelled up all summer. I wouldn't count on those trees always taking mositure out.
post #23 of 29
They can be used as shoe trees for as long as you are not desperate for firewood.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post
Forever.

Hear, hear.

EZ
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avebury View Post
This is incorrect. Cedar wood shoe trees, for example, do absorb moisture from the shoe. The better shoes trees (think Edward Green) have a hole within the shoe tree designed to funnel out warm air and condensation. They are also made to fit the last of the respective shoe, so they do everthing doubly well (e.g. better shape retention, less creasing).
What BS.

They do it so that they weigh less, so that they cost EG less to ship.

Duh.

For all you (clearly) scientifically minded people who think that cedar/wood trees can 'absorb' significant amounts of moisture day in, day out. Think about it - where does the water go? Or does all the water that gets absorbed in the 16 hours they are in the shoe make somehow get out of the shoe tree in the 8 hours they are left lying around?
post #26 of 29
"I wring out my cedar shoe trees after each use. They last forever that way." - Chuck Norris
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post
nice. only SF can alert me to the fact that there needs to be a care and maintenance process for my care and maintenance process

Don't forget the care and maintenance process for the sandpaper and cedar oil. The sand paper should be kept in a cedar box and gently buffed with a chamois glove every 2 weeks. This ensures maximum abrasiveness and enhances the scent restoration process. The cedar oil should be stored in a whisky cask submerged in a mixture of champagne and hickory shavings. This will enhance the essential oils and round out the aroma. I only use single malt (tree) cedar oil, aged 12 years.
post #28 of 29
I would also say forever. However, if you use the spring-loaded type (non-lasted trees from a shoe store), the spring will eventually rust up. The tress I inherited from my grandfather eventually got stuck and no longer did their job. Wally
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smudge View Post
"I wring out my cedar shoe trees after each use. They last forever that way." - Chuck Norris

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Swede View Post
Don't forget the care and maintenance process for the sandpaper and cedar oil. The sand paper should be kept in a cedar box and gently buffed with a chamois glove every 2 weeks. This ensures maximum abrasiveness and enhances the scent restoration process. The cedar oil should be stored in a whisky cask submerged in a mixture of champagne and hickory shavings. This will enhance the essential oils andround out the aroma. I only use single malt (tree) cedar oil, aged 12 years.

:lol!:
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