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Which European dishes/beverages are done worst in USA - Page 5

post #61 of 70
Europe has horribly frightful chinese and Mexican food. Much better chinese and Mexican food is served in the United states and Canada.
post #62 of 70
Do they even have mexicans in Canada?
post #63 of 70
Never mind, not worth it.
post #64 of 70
I always thought pancakes with real maple syrup was a Canadian thing - whenever I've had it in the US it's been with synthetic syrup.

Simple cakes and pies are fairly universal, with regional specialities, such as British scones (nothing like the dire 'biscuit' things the Americans produce). Almost always, these things are better when homemade than shop-bought.

Whilst the best pecan pie I ever had was made by my aunt in Tulsa, she was also responsible for one example of quite the worst thing I have ever eaten in the US - pumpkin pie - utterly disgusting, whether homemade or from a restaurant.

As far as pizza goes, the real thing in Italy is hard to beat; most of the versions elsewhere are variations on the American interpretation with various toppings.
post #65 of 70
Pumpkin pie, I suppose you have to grow up in the US to possibly appreciate it. It grows on you after a while. A few years ago, it made me gag, now I can actually eat a few bites. But yes, I absolutely agree on pecan pie, this can be delicious, if done correctly.
post #66 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid609
Europe has horribly frightful chinese and Mexican food.

Much better chinese and Mexican food is served in the United states and Canada.

Since this thread long-ago meandered away from Mr. Pollock's idea of European dishes poorly and improperly prepared in America . . . I would like to add my two pesos worth here and remark that while many "horribly frightful chinese (sp) and Mexican food" establishments exist in Europe, the same can be said for the existence of such in America.

Perhaps ironically, one the very best Tex-Mex style Mexican restaurants we have visited was in Russia. Senor Pepe's Mexican Restaurant on Lomonosova Ulitsa in St. Petersburg can vie with best of it's type in southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas.

Nevertheless, I would have to say it's a brave endeavor for one to attempt to profitably and faithfully recreate European dishes (in general) in America. While it's not impossible, the dearth of specific ingredients, proper hardware, skilled labor, and sufficient demand make most of those recipes a challenge.
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post #67 of 70
while I have never had good mexican outside of the americas (and I think you can't even get good mexican in much of the states), you can get very good chinese in europe. the trick is to remeber that what you are eating isn't really authentic chinese, as such. frankly, there are few places in the states that have good, authentic chinese. what you are typicaly eating in one of these resteraunts in food that is prepared in a chinese style, often based on some chinese foods.

you can get very good cantonese food, including pretty authentic, in london. the signature dishes are different from what are common in the US, but still very good. you can also get some pretty authentic chinese in paris. but more importantly, you can get great interpretations of chinese food in many parts of europe - just like the indian interpretation of chinese food is a cuisine in and of itself, the eastern european take on chinese food can be enjoyed for what it is.
post #68 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas
Since this thread long-ago meandered away from Mr. Pollock's idea of European dishes poorly and improperly prepared in America . . . I would like to add my two pesos worth here and remark that while many "horribly frightful chinese (sp) and Mexican food" establishments exist in Europe, the same can be said for the existence of such in America.

Perhaps ironically, one the very best Tex-Mex style Mexican restaurants we have visited was in Russia. Senor Pepe's Mexican Restaurant on Lomonosova Ulitsa in St. Petersburg can vie with best of it's type in southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas.

Nevertheless, I would have to say it's a brave endeavor for one to attempt to profitably and faithfully recreate European dishes (in general) in America. While it's not impossible, the dearth of specific ingredients, proper hardware, skilled labor, and sufficient demand make most of those recipes a challenge.

tex-mex is not mexican food.
post #69 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by matadorpoeta
tex-mex is not mexican food.

Not withstanding the English-only speaking Selena's part in coining the phrase and making the style of Tex-Mex better known, even mis amigos Mexicanos would debate that with you, Matador. Don't you feel that most any kitchen can produce poetry? Nevertheless, my statement was fully qualified as Tex-Mex Style Mexican restaurants.

Over the past three decades, I have had the pleasure to many times over experience several of the distinct regional styles of Mexican cuisine while traveling in Mexico. They are (as you might be implying) quite different from the taco shop menu of Tex-Mex. The meats of Sonora and Sinoloa can be sublimely simple. Even the Poblana and Michoacan kitchens have prepared many fine meals for me.

The fish styles of Vera Cruz and Oaxaca are fine variations for those who eat fish. We regularly dine in a wonderful Vera Cruz style restaurant when we are home in San Diego. The restaurant owner also owns the fishing boat!

Since this restaurant is not located in Mexico, is it a Mexican restaurant? Are the Tex-Mex restaurants on the Mexican side of the border Mexican restaurants? When I enjoy some of my long-cellared Bodegas Santo Tomas wines harvested and bottled while non-Mexican Andre Tchelistcheff steered the previously slumbering winery that was founded by Spanish Dominican Monks, am I drinking Mexican wine?

Maybe the line is blurred? The thread was about European dishes poorly prepared in America. I concluded my original remarks by stating, "While it's not impossible, the dearth of specific ingredients, proper hardware, skilled labor, and sufficient demand make most of those recipes a challenge." That is likely equally true for any Mexican-inspired cuisine prepared anywhere.

As soon as we return from Minsk, my wife and I are going to get some Vera Cruz style fish! I can hardly wait until the end of May to do so. Good Mexican-inspired food is just that, no matter what it's called or where it's eaten.

Buen Provecho!
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post #70 of 70
tex-mex is not a mexican style. it is an american idea of mexican food. you referred to a place known as "senor pepe's mexican restaurant." i say that if it is tex-mex style, then it is actually american food.

let me give you a classic example: tex-mex tacos are usually a flour tortilla, ground beef, lettuce and cheese.

1. the flour tortilla is not mexican. we know what they are, but they do not exist in mexico. they are a u.s. invention.

2. ground beef does not exist in mexican cooking. the only ground beef in mexico is used for hamburgers and other foreign foods.

3. you will never ever find a taco in mexico with cheese in it.

4. certain recipes may use lettuce, but very rarely, and it is not typical.

so there you have a tex-mex taco that has ZERO mexican ingredients. you're essentially getting a hamburger with flat bread.

even worse are the pre-manufactured taco shells which do not exist in mexico.

this is not to say that i hat tex-mex. whether i like it or not isn't the point. i just think it's misleading to label it mexican food. 'mexican inspired' is okay with me.
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