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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1357

post #20341 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krish the Fish View Post

How does shipping work for FP? I have a case worth of wine that is "ready for pickup/shipment", and what looks like another case of wine that's allocated and will be ready to be shipped soon. Do they just ship it when I have a case ready to go, and they charge me? Or do they wait for me to email them about shipping? I just want to know if I have to let them know to ship

I think their shipping window is still closed but should open later this month. Once open they will ship in 12 bottle increments and charge your credit card on file. It's pretty hands off- the only action required is if there are specific dates you do not want them to ship, and you can notify them in the shipping portal.
post #20342 of 20660
^Awesome thanks! FWIW, when I go to their home page it says the shipping window is now open. Glad to hear I don't need to do anything (unless I want them to hold off on shipping).

Piob's posts about the Certified exam gave me something new to look at, and I think the tastings and bookwork behind the Certified Sommelier exam is exactly what I was looking for to learn more about wine. I've begun printing out the tasting profiles from the handbook whenever I open a bottle of wine that's on the Certified list of varietals and regions so I can put some words to what I'm tasting, and focus my palate a bit. I'm generally the wine guy whenever I go to dinner with family, so it would be nice to know more about wine instead of shooting blind, so to speak. I don't necessarily want to take the exam, but I do want to do the legwork required to learn more about what wines go well with what, what notes to expect with varietals, etc.
post #20343 of 20660
Where would a schmuck like me find these grids?
post #20344 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwlbu View Post

That's true, also the fruit begins to subdue with bottle age, and if you decant too long you can start to lose the fruit quickly. However, what Eric mentioned about decanting to remove sediment makes perfect sense - older Bordeauxs tend to have a fair amount of sediment.

I've filtered out old Bordeaux sediment with cheese cloth before, so we'll probably continue with that.

Open-->filter into small decanter--> let sit for 15-30min--> shotgun all at once.

Sounds like a plan.
post #20345 of 20660
FWIW, if you want FP to ship now, you can just send them an email and they'll send it the following day
post #20346 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

Where would a schmuck like me find these grids?

https://www.mastersommeliers.org/resources


FP waits for me to email them to ship. I'm over 11 cases there now.
post #20347 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcusey View Post

The place I go regularly has a regular thing on Sundays where they pour three ounces of three testable wines. You have to identify the grape and the region. If you get four of the six correct, it's free; otherwise, it's $15. It's fun to watch the industry types on the certification track work through the grid, and I have done it a few times myself. It's not easy unless there's something like gamay or riesling that I can identify in my sleep. People think that blind tasting is a sort of parlor trick, but it's not. There's nothing like blind tasting to make you question whether you actually know anything at all about wine.
Houston? If so I'm there all the time. I'm at about 50% it being free, last week they did two Mosel Rieslings side by side which totally threw me off, I guessed Australia on one.
post #20348 of 20660

i am not a fan of wine

post #20349 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

Where would a schmuck like me find these grids?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

https://www.mastersommeliers.org/resources

That page has the current Certified grids for both red and white, but I've heard a lot of grumbling from candidates who are unhappy with the way it has been dumbed down. The Deductive Tasting Format document at Piob's link is probably better.

(Edit: The Court of Master Sommeliers has four levels of certification: Level 1, Certified, Advanced, and Master. From what I have heard, Level 1 isn't very difficult, and Certified is possible for someone who's into wine and willing to put the study time in. Advanced takes a good deal of dedication and talent, and Master is extremely difficult.)
post #20350 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexg View Post

Houston? If so I'm there all the time. I'm at about 50% it being free, last week they did two Mosel Rieslings side by side which totally threw me off, I guessed Australia on one.

Yes, Houston. I almost invariably get caught by by varieties that I rarely drink (Aussie Shiraz, Argentinian Malbec). The most diabolical that I ever participated in consisted of three whites, and they told you before that all were either Albarino or GV.
post #20351 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcusey View Post


That page has the current Certified grids for both red and white, but I've heard a lot of grumbling from candidates who are unhappy with the way it has been dumbed down. The Deductive Tasting Format document at Piob's link is probably better.

(Edit: The Court of Master Sommeliers has four levels of certification: Level 1, Certified, Advanced, and Master. From what I have heard, Level 1 isn't very difficult, and Certified is possible for someone who's into wine and willing to put the study time in. Advanced takes a good deal of dedication and talent, and Master is extremely difficult.)

If you look at the two formats the only real difference is that the certified is bracketed by the varietals but the methodology is the same. As the Court is only going to give certified level folks certain varietals in the first place officially bracketing the varietals better guides students in their tasting practice. As I mentioned to CB above so many people want to start going to esoteric varietals or examples that are atypical and somm students are no different. This helps prevent that from occurring and I think is actually a smart move. Let the Master candidates worry about discerning Gelber Muskateller from Malvasia Istriana.

The choke point for afficiandos vs. industry folks in the certified is the service component. Not only do you need to physically do service properly you need to do it while keeping up a running patter with the mock guests as they pepper you with questions about everything from Amaros to cigar choices.
post #20352 of 20660
At this stage of my understanding, the simpler the grid, the better.

Am I right to assume that the Somm documentary follows "Master" level applicants? What level are you after, Piob?
post #20353 of 20660
I just re-took my intro as you only have three years to go for your cert and missed that window by a couple of years.

The two grids are basically the same but the one just limits the choice of varietals whereas the master level leaves it open for anything.

Yes, Somm is about a handful of guys going after their Master level. If you're into wine it's an enjoyable movie, if not, you'll think they're just a bunch of self-absorb nerds...which they are.
post #20354 of 20660
The follow-up Somm: into the bottle was also a nice and enjoyable film. It doesn't have as cohesive a narrative as the first, but it does have some great moments.

The first is where they make fun of the wines that are popular pretty much only with the somm's. The second is when Ian opens the Barolo. Every time you see him with that glass of red after, every time, he's got a huge grin.
post #20355 of 20660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

If you look at the two formats the only real difference is that the certified is bracketed by the varietals but the methodology is the same.

Yes, the methodology is the same; but the Certified grid has a very abbreviated section on the appearance of the wine, and they've collapsed the nose and flavor elements of the palate into one section.
Quote:
As the Court is only going to give certified level folks certain varietals in the first place officially bracketing the varietals better guides students in their tasting practice. As I mentioned to CB above so many people want to start going to esoteric varietals or examples that are atypical and somm students are no different. This helps prevent that from occurring and I think is actually a smart move. Let the Master candidates worry about discerning Gelber Muskateller from Malvasia Istriana.

This is true. Kind of apropos of this, I was familiar with the list of testable varieties for the Advanced exam, and I assumed that the list was the same for the Master exam. I then saw an episode of Uncorked (the Esquire TV series last year from the makers of Somm -- same basic premise with different principal characters and a longer format) where one of the characters was at a competition and called Fiano for one of the white wines. I was confused because Fiano was on no list of testable varieties I had ever seen, and I asked the head wine guy at the place I go, who was a Master candidate at the time (he since has passed). He said that the list for Master list contains more esoteric stuff than the Advanced, and oh, by the way, that wine in the competition was indeed Fiano.
Quote:
The choke point for afficiandos vs. industry folks in the certified is the service component. Not only do you need to physically do service properly you need to do it while keeping up a running patter with the mock guests as they pepper you with questions about everything from Amaros to cigar choices.

I think another advantage that most industry folks will have over non-industry people is that they're part of the club: in most cases, it's a lot easier for them to get into serious study groups and find higher-level sommeliers who are willing to work with them on their tasting (and service) and pour lots of really good wine to help them develop.
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