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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1355

post #20311 of 21079
I got a few of those Nine Hats- same guys do Long Shadows right?
post #20312 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Been doing blind tastings for the last few weeks. Using strictly the "testable varietals" for the certified exam. I have a dozen or so in a section of the cellar, Mrs. Piob picks one and pours me a glass, I sit down and analyze it. Today's wine was just mildly corked, the type where it basically just washes out the wine. There was next to zero nose but I still went for it. Final choices were Oz Shiraz or Mendoza Malbec. I went Malbec but the answer was Columbia Valley Syrah.

So, if you got any bottles of Nine Hats from Full Pull, check out what I found with this wine. Super purple, stained the glass. Just almost zero nose and nothing to indicate a WA Syrah.

The place I go regularly has a regular thing on Sundays where they pour three ounces of three testable wines. You have to identify the grape and the region. If you get four of the six correct, it's free; otherwise, it's $15. It's fun to watch the industry types on the certification track work through the grid, and I have done it a few times myself. It's not easy unless there's something like gamay or riesling that I can identify in my sleep. People think that blind tasting is a sort of parlor trick, but it's not. There's nothing like blind tasting to make you question whether you actually know anything at all about wine.
post #20313 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcusey View Post

The place I go regularly has a regular thing on Sundays where they pour three ounces of three testable wines. You have to identify the grape and the region. If you get four of the six correct, it's free; otherwise, it's $15. It's fun to watch the industry types on the certification track work through the grid, and I have done it a few times myself. It's not easy unless there's something like gamay or riesling that I can identify in my sleep. People think that blind tasting is a sort of parlor trick, but it's not. There's nothing like blind tasting to make you question whether you actually know anything at all about wine.

That is kind of awesome.

Yeah, it's no parlour trick, nor is coming to a final conclusion that's incorrect necessarily a horrible thing. I mean if you get all the indicators correct, but come to a differential conclusion, at least you walked the path correctly. It's sort of like doing an entire equation correctly but getting the wrong answer.
post #20314 of 21079
Some wines over the past couple of weeks. The images are all pilfered.



Vignai Da Duline is one of Kermit Lynch's Italian properties, located in Friuili. This wine was fantastic -- medium body, high acid, lots of minerals, not a whole lot of overt fruit. I could drink this every day. It's the perfect Friulian white. I know that Lynch has been importing Italian wines for a number of years, but I never saw them in my market until the past couple of years. I've loved every one that I've tried.



I had never heard of Scarpa until maybe 6 or 8 months ago, and I still know next to nothing. They're a Monferrato winery, and a lot of their library releases -- mostly Barolo -- have shown up in my market recently. From what I can tell, they're very much in the traditionalist camp. I'll admit that I only bought this because I was curious about what 20 year old barbera would taste like. If this wine is any indication, 20 year old barbera is delicious. There was no overt fruit on the nose but a ton on the palate, and it was very herbal (but not green) and tart, with no tannins left. It's not exactly a bargain, but I loved it.



I had the 2013 version of this. Cascina delle Rose is a Barbaresco winery, and I have previously been very impressed with their Rio Sordo Barbarescos -- excellent, and excellent value (for Barbaresco). This wine is herbal and very tart and delicious. Very, very good.
post #20315 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Been doing blind tastings for the last few weeks. Using strictly the "testable varietals" for the certified exam. I have a dozen or so in a section of the cellar, Mrs. Piob picks one and pours me a glass, I sit down and analyze it. Today's wine was just mildly corked, the type where it basically just washes out the wine. There was next to zero nose but I still went for it. Final choices were Oz Shiraz or Mendoza Malbec. I went Malbec but the answer was Columbia Valley Syrah.

So, if you got any bottles of Nine Hats from Full Pull, check out what I found with this wine. Super purple, stained the glass. Just almost zero nose and nothing to indicate a WA Syrah.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcusey View Post

The place I go regularly has a regular thing on Sundays where they pour three ounces of three testable wines. You have to identify the grape and the region. If you get four of the six correct, it's free; otherwise, it's $15. It's fun to watch the industry types on the certification track work through the grid, and I have done it a few times myself. It's not easy unless there's something like gamay or riesling that I can identify in my sleep. People think that blind tasting is a sort of parlor trick, but it's not. There's nothing like blind tasting to make you question whether you actually know anything at all about wine.

Knowing how hard it is to get this stuff right seriously has me questioning why I spend what I do on wine. If I'm enjoying it because of the label, I'm probably better off just getting the wife to do the shopping and then tear all the labels off before I see them. At least that way is save some $.
post #20316 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

That is kind of awesome.

Yeah, it's no parlour trick, nor is coming to a final conclusion that's incorrect necessarily a horrible thing. I mean if you get all the indicators correct, but come to a differential conclusion, at least you walked the path correctly. It's sort of like doing an entire equation correctly but getting the wrong answer.

Yes, there have been cases where I was wrong but I felt I did everything right in getting to the conclusion -- I'm not ashamed about calling Muscadet wen it was actually Chablis or Gruner Veltliner when it was actually Albarino. It's when it's Chianti and I called Rioja that I get embarrassed.
post #20317 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post


Knowing how hard it is to get this stuff right seriously has me questioning why I spend what I do on wine. If I'm enjoying it because of the label, I'm probably better off just getting the wife to do the shopping and then tear all the labels off before I see them. At least that way is save some $.

So here's something recommended to train palates. Buy a California oak/butter bomb like a La Crema or Kendall-Jackson. Then buy a completely unoaked, no MLF Chablis (not hard to find nor expensive unless you go grand cru). The differences between those two different Chards will make you a believer.
post #20318 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post


Knowing how hard it is to get this stuff right seriously has me questioning why I spend what I do on wine. If I'm enjoying it because of the label, I'm probably better off just getting the wife to do the shopping and then tear all the labels off before I see them. At least that way is save some $.

When you have guests over for dinner you could do a blind tasting with three bottles as a fun interactive game
post #20319 of 21079
If you do that though don't make the mistake so many people make. Don't use esoteric wines or atypical versions of the varietal. The goal should be well known varietals with examples that are very high in typicity. A really grapefruity or grassy New Zealand Sauv Blanc with lush tropical fruits or a low alcohol, high acid bone dry, Riesling from the Mosel with that distinct petrol note some of them have. Something that should just scream the what it is.
post #20320 of 21079
This is good advice- my first thought would be to show off and get some really atypical/"interesting" stuff, but I think that would defeat the point of the exercise.
post #20321 of 21079
Back from France today. Interesting to note differences in wine culture. Lots of places have a TON of glass pours, but I can't imagine that everything sells fast enough to keep things in good condition. Lots of good wine is inexpensive - majority of many lists was in the 20-30 euro range. In a lot of ways wine is a big deal (it's kind of expected to order some), but also not a big deal - treated much more like a beverage and less like a luxury/treat.

I laughed at myself when we went to Paul Bocuse for dinner. They don't have a wine list online, but I had basically decided ahead of time that I was looking for a bottle of (hopefully aged) demi-sec/off dry Vouvray, given what we were going to be eating. The somm comes by and hands me this Tome so I just tell him what I have in mind and he says they only have one demi sec Vouvray and points it out to me. It was $50. I kind of panic, because thats probably the cheapest bottle on their list and I don't want to be that guy, so I look for a minute, but decided to go with that I'd thought about ahead of time, price be damned. It was fantastic and exactly what I was looking for (maybe not quite as aged/nutty as I'd dreamed, but very very good). Used the unexpected wine budget savings for a couple more glasses of champagne and after dinner sauternes (wife) and calvados (me). I was going to go with cognac, but there were some really weird and esoteric looking calvados on there that I figured I'd never see the like of again.
post #20322 of 21079
Will have with dinner tonight.

post #20323 of 21079
I thought you didn't like sea smoke

Or wait was that just me
post #20324 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

Back from France today. Interesting to note differences in wine culture. Lots of places have a TON of glass pours, but I can't imagine that everything sells fast enough to keep things in good condition. Lots of good wine is inexpensive - majority of many lists was in the 20-30 euro range. In a lot of ways wine is a big deal (it's kind of expected to order some), but also not a big deal - treated much more like a beverage and less like a luxury/treat.

I laughed at myself when we went to Paul Bocuse for dinner. They don't have a wine list online, but I had basically decided ahead of time that I was looking for a bottle of (hopefully aged) demi-sec/off dry Vouvray, given what we were going to be eating. The somm comes by and hands me this Tome so I just tell him what I have in mind and he says they only have one demi sec Vouvray and points it out to me. It was $50. I kind of panic, because thats probably the cheapest bottle on their list and I don't want to be that guy, so I look for a minute, but decided to go with that I'd thought about ahead of time, price be damned. It was fantastic and exactly what I was looking for (maybe not quite as aged/nutty as I'd dreamed, but very very good). Used the unexpected wine budget savings for a couple more glasses of champagne and after dinner sauternes (wife) and calvados (me). I was going to go with cognac, but there were some really weird and esoteric looking calvados on there that I figured I'd never see the like of again.

"please bring us your second-cheapest bottle of wine" *tugs at collar*
post #20325 of 21079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Will have with dinner tonight.


Local restaurant wants $60 for a glass of the 2012. Enjoy it.
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