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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1329

post #19921 of 20841


Let me start this post with a holy shit!

By way of background, I'm not a Malbec fan generally and haven't really responded to the call of the South American wines. Someone gave me this bottle for Christmas. I don't remember who. I only know because they wrote "Merry Christmas" in permanent marker on the bottle.

Needed something to drink with pizza tonight, so...

Only after I opened it and went "holy shit" did I decide to investigate the bottle. Turns out that it's a single vineyard from 61 year old vines. Drinks much more like a right bank Bordeaux than what I think of as a Malbec. Very tannic. Bit short on the finish. Recommended. 👍
post #19922 of 20841
Such great value.

post #19923 of 20841
I'm very disappointed to hear the news about Copain. I didn't expect it at all either, they didn't seem like the type to sell out.
post #19924 of 20841
Why wouldn't he? Owning a winery is a lot like owning your own restaurant. It can be a fairly large capital commitment to sell a product with lumpy cash flows, that can be highly variable and vintage dependent. I don't know the details of the transaction, but it would seem that now, he gets a pile of cash, likely still has a lot of control over the direction of the winery, and has a shit ton of resources at his disposal that he didn't have before, with little to no risk. He's probably about 40 now, so a little security is probably pretty attractive at this point in his life.
Edited by coolpapa - 5/18/16 at 3:57am
post #19925 of 20841
Going to be in Napa for a few days this summer. Any recs for wineries we should check out? I was thinking maybe Corison, but I don't know if the $55 tour & tasting would be worth it.
post #19926 of 20841
I find the historic properties much more fun to visit: Mondavi, BV, Beringer, Inglenook would be my top recs.
post #19927 of 20841
Cool--wasn't sure whether I should avoid those because they're too theme-park like. Come to think of it, I've been to Beringer back when I was in college (last time I was up in Napa).
post #19928 of 20841
Mondavi is the best place to taste, IMO. Pay the very reasonable fee in the Reserve room.
post #19929 of 20841
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

Cool--wasn't sure whether I should avoid those because they're too theme-park like. Come to think of it, I've been to Beringer back when I was in college (last time I was up in Napa).

People are always shocked (knowing that I'm in the industry and have been 50+ times) when I recommend the big corporate wineries to visit - to me, it's more than about tasting wine, you can do that in your home. Take the tram up to Sterling, go to Mondavi, visit Artesa and see that view... then there are the smaller guys you want to call in advance that will give you some local flavor but have been there for a long time too - I always send friends up the mountain to Burgess, great place to visit, spectacular views, rustic. Then fill in with a couple of tastings of special wines that you don't or can't get your hands on. Take the time to make a few appointments with smaller guys who will give you personal attention. Head over to Sonoma, lunch or breakfast at the Fremont Diner on the way, and stop into Keller Estate for terrific Chard, Pinot and Syrah. (then ask if any special cars are out to see - they house one of the world's greatest private car collections)
post #19930 of 20841
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

Going to be in Napa for a few days this summer. Any recs for wineries we should check out? I was thinking maybe Corison, but I don't know if the $55 tour & tasting would be worth it.

I've done wine tastings at a bunch of properties in Napa as well as less traveled places in North America and Italy. I really don't like the "factory" feel of the tours and tastings in Napa -- I found most to be very impersonal, you're just hearing rehearsed schtick, and ultimately it does not feel like a unique experience. (Contrast that with my visits to, say, top Barolo producers, where we were often alone and really treated like family, not potential wine club members.)

 

That said, I really did enjoy and would highly recommend visiting Whetstone. They mainly produce pinot noir from Russian River and Sonoma, but the property in Napa is really beautiful -- a modest stone chateau with a large, shady, tree-filled yard and picnic tables at which you can plop down and relax while sipping on some excellent wine for as long as you'd like.

 

Ultimately, less is more. You might feel the need to cram in as many tours as you can. Don't. You're better off taking your time, and after a couple visits, you'll start to realize they all mostly tell you the same shit anyways (not that I don't care to hear about maceration times and malolactic fermentation, but I can get that info online), and you'll wish you just picked up a couple bottles and had a picnic on your hotel balcony instead.

post #19931 of 20841
The sterling tram is kind of fun

Also, for the ultimate in 1970s chic, domain chandon. Like the set of 6 million dollar man
post #19932 of 20841
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisGold View Post

I'm in the industry and have been 50+ times

Quote:
Originally Posted by brisbane87 View Post

Contrast that with my visits to, say, top Barolo producers, where we were often alone and really treated like family, not potential wine club members.

Well my trip sure sounds shabby now.

Just kidding; still looking forward to it.
post #19933 of 20841
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post



Well my trip sure sounds shabby now.

Just kidding; still looking forward to it.

Aw, I didn't mean it like that. I was more getting at that you may have more fun getting off the beaten path in Napa -- well, at least as far off as one can get there -- and getting a more intimate experience than checking off the big-name places.

post #19934 of 20841
Hi all,

Not sure if this is the best place for this, but hey ho. Two questions:

1) My little boy was born last year and I would like to get hold of a bottle of something from 2015 that will be good to drink in 2036 for his 21st birthday. I have no idea if 2015 was a good enough year anywhere to have wines that might last this long. Looking not to spend too too much, but can stretch a bit, especially if it significantly improves the chances of the wine being still good. Any thoughts or recommendations much appreciated.

2) Very similar to 1), but shooting for 2023 for drinking. Presumably much easier to achieve and for somewhat less money. That will be my 10 year anniversary, so again not looking to scrimp and save. Thoughts?

Thanks!
post #19935 of 20841
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

The sterling tram is kind of fun

Also, for the ultimate in 1970s chic, domain chandon. Like the set of 6 million dollar man

On the way down I had to go backwards (facing the hill) so I wouldn't see how far up we were
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