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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1326

post #19876 of 20661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


I put myself in for six. I'm hoping it's as good a QPR as the Berg family 07 was.

They were zeroed out of the Berg before I tried to pick some up (on your recommendation) - though didn't you get that for like 9.99 or something stupid because the label looked like a DIY project?
post #19877 of 20661
It was pretty cheap and I got a re-order in. Think I got a case altogether and have probably drank half of it already.
post #19878 of 20661
Is it true that the primary beneficiaries of "good" vintages are middle-of-the-road and below wines/wineries? It seems like there will always be enough really good fruit to make the perennial heavyweight wines, but that during good years the 2nd and 3rd tier wines get much better fruit than average?
post #19879 of 20661
You're talking New World, particularly Left Coast, here? Probably folks like that do get better fruit than they normally would...but they're still the same winemaker.
post #19880 of 20661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

You're talking New World, particularly Left Coast, here? Probably folks like that do get better fruit than they normally would...but they're still the same winemaker.


Yeah, especially considering that there is very little dry land farming in Washington, I assume most of CA is irrigated as well?

I don't have enough knowledge to know, but is the skill of the winemaker more or less important than the fruit quality? It seems like a lot of good winemakers generally extol the quality of the fruit they receive and say they just let it do it's thing - is that just false modesty?

I've just set off on this train of though cause you like the Berg wine so much, but it's a little surprising its so good, given that it is the one and only vintage of a new to Washington winemaker and it's not labeled as from any prestigious source. 2007 was considered to be a great vintage in WA and I was wondering if that is the reason for the high quality.
Edited by RedLantern - 4/17/16 at 11:06am
post #19881 of 20661
I don't have the answer to that one but I have to think a better wine maker will do more with any given fruit than a poor one.
post #19882 of 20661
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

Yeah, especially considering that there is very little dry land farming in Washington, I assume most of CA is irrigated as well?

I don't have enough knowledge to know, but is the skill of the winemaker more or less important than the fruit quality? It seems like a lot of good winemakers generally extol the quality of the fruit they receive and say they just let it do it's thing - is that just false modesty?

Yes - well, not false modesty if meant cynically, but yes.

A crap winemaker could do damn all with any grape A skilled maker can nurse crap grapes along to something marginal... and make symphonies out of perfect grapes and seasons.
post #19883 of 20661

But I do think the top tier makers usually already  have access to great grapes, and therefore having a good vintage helps the mid-tier (giving them grapes of a much higher quality than normal) much more than the upper echelons (who always had the best anyway).

post #19884 of 20661
Happy Malbec day everyone!

When I first had it, I didn't have good makers, and probably drank it a little young. Now, I like it quite a bit. Just need some large formats for a proper cookout


post #19885 of 20661
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

I've just set off on this train of though cause you like the Berg wine so much, but it's a little surprising its so good, given that it is the one and only vintage of a new to Washington winemaker and it's not labeled as from any prestigious source. 2007 was considered to be a great vintage in WA and I was wondering if that is the reason for the high quality.

Ah, I see. Well, the Berg wine is a wine I like a lot....for $10. It's completely drinkable, even quaffable, but it's not a wine to inspire or sip searching for an array of flavours and smells. It's just a nice drinking/food wine for $10. I mean, I've had more complex Zins than this Cab (for $30-40 a bottle mind you), but for what it is the Berg is an incredible value.
post #19886 of 20661
1996 Gloria yesterday. Probably a bit young, but perfect bottle and delicious. One of the cheapest of the good Bords and, relative to its peers, it always out-performs.
post #19887 of 20661
^ I know you're the biggest enemy of infanticide around these parts, but for godsakes 1996 is when I graduated from high school. Surely a Bord has had sufficient time to develop in the time that I've gone from tannic high school graduate to ripened paragon of manhood.
post #19888 of 20661
old people
post #19889 of 20661
hey man I'm young in wine port years
Edited by erictheobscure - 4/17/16 at 6:33pm
post #19890 of 20661
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

^ I know you're the biggest enemy of infanticide around these parts, but for godsakes 1996 is when I graduated from high school. Surely a Bord has had sufficient time to develop in the time that I've gone from tannic high school graduate to ripened paragon of manhood.

Still a bit tight and primary for me.
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