or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Wine Thread - Page 1317

post #19741 of 20671
Very easy drinking, light/bright cherry,

post #19742 of 20671
I might be getting control over the wine list at the restaurant I work at. Tentatively excited, but a little worried that I wouldn't be able to offer a lot of good stuff because our price point is too low. At any rate I'm interested to do some research and see how different pricing models work and if our owners would consider different options and strategies.
post #19743 of 20671
For example, we have limited physical menu space, but I'd be interested in paring down our list if it meant I could offer more information about the wines rather than just year, varietal and country. I think we could do a better job of selling the wines we offer vs just offering more wine, especially considering that many of our customers are not very wine savvy.

Case in point, rather than offering two very similar Cab/Malbec/Syrah blends, both at low prices, I would just offer one and give a blurb about the character of the wine. It just seems to me that if you are trying to sell lower priced wine (ostensibly to people who don't know much about wine), you would sell more of it by telling them something about it that means something to them and might make them interested(or at least less intimidated), rather than offering more labels which mean very little to them.


I'm also aware that this may not be true in practice, so anyone who has first hand knowledge please chime in!
post #19744 of 20671
@RedLantern- I've only been crafting a menu now after two years in business, and it's a short list (typically 6-7 each reds and whites, 8-9 "reserve" bottles, and a sparkling or two) so limited experience... but I'd say less is most definitely more on a wine list. And I mean less narrative. Leave it to/train the servers to tell those stories where appropriate. More narrative, IMO, actually narrows appeal- few customers come to a description of wine in the way you might, assigning various different meanings to the same words. You may actually turn a customer away from a wine because they take a description differently than you.

Previously we wrote more description- but tight space continued to edit that down. We're selling more than ever and the staff is better having to know rather than rely on menu text.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

Case in point, rather than offering two very similar Cab/Malbec/Syrah blends, both at low prices, I would just offer one and give a blurb about the character of the wine.

Might that space best be used to add another wine to the menu that increases diversity, rather than talking more about one?

Do you have data to analyze what your customers are buying and want?
Edited by Cary Grant - 2/18/16 at 5:37am
post #19745 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

@RedLantern- I've only been crafting a menu now after two years in business, and it's a short list (typically 6-7 each reds and whites, 8-9 "reserve" bottles, and a sparkling or two) so limited experience... but I'd say less is most definitely more on a wine list. And I mean less narrative. Leave it to/train the servers to tell those stories where appropriate. More narrative, IMO, actually narrows appeal- few customers come to a description of wine in the way you might, assigning various different meanings to the same words. You may actually turn a customer away from a wine because they take a description differently than you.

Previously we wrote more description- but tight space continued to edit that down. We're selling more than ever and the staff is better having to know rather than rely on menu text.
Might that space best be used to add another wine to the menu that increases diversity, rather than talking more about one?

Do you have data to analyze what your customers are buying and want?

Thanks for the input!

As far as data goes, I'm not sure what the owners have, but I've been a waiter at the restaurant since we opened, I have thoughts and impressions based on my experience, but no quantifiable data yet.

Certainly I would favor diversity over redundancy on the list, but I guess my question is better stated : In a case where many of your customers are not very knowledgeable, is a shorter but more descriptive list preferable to added diversity?

I certainly take your point about wine descriptions being pretty worthless, I was thinking more along the lines of "a complex and well-aged wine from the north of Spain" for a Rioja, or "Crowd pleasing and easy drinking" for a quaff-able fruity pinot . . .
post #19746 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

Thanks for the input!

As far as data goes, I'm not sure what the owners have, but I've been a waiter at the restaurant since we opened, I have thoughts and impressions based on my experience, but no quantifiable data yet.

Certainly I would favor diversity over redundancy on the list, but I guess my question is better stated : In a case where many of your customers are not very knowledgeable, is a shorter but more descriptive list preferable to added diversity?

I certainly take your point about wine descriptions being pretty worthless, I was thinking more along the lines of "a complex and well-aged wine from the north of Spain" for a Rioja, or "Crowd pleasing and easy drinking" for a quaff-able fruity pinot . . .

For an unsophisticated clientele, a progressive wine list is usually preferable, as that will give them some guidance without having to add much in terms of descriptors. Also, a few well known favorites will go a long way towards making the customer comfortable with the list. No matter how well trained the staff, if the clientele isn't open to experimentation, you don't want to alienate them with a list that is too esoteric. In my experience, in that type of environment, a simple, easy to understand list with some old favorites is best for your base list, and you then supplement that with experimental "specials." If there is a special that really takes off it can jump onto the list, if it flops, no harm no foul. Your salespeople should be able to print menu or table tent inserts and will fight for that business as new "on-premise" placements are always needed in a given month.
post #19747 of 20671
Red, the main thing you want from your sales people is samples. smile.gif

Don't forget to put something we would all sneer at but that people tend to like, i.e. white Zin
post #19748 of 20671
If anyone orders Merlot I'm fucking leaving.
post #19749 of 20671

Supposedly it's international wine day today?  Drinking this.... Excellent wine, especially for $22CAD

post #19750 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post



Recommended as having a good QPR by the local BCL head cheese.

Can report that this is excellent. I think it was like $30ish CAN

Dark fruity, a bit of oak and pepper. Pretty nice on its own.
post #19751 of 20671
Tonight with chicken piccata

post #19752 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Red, the main thing you want from your sales people is samples. smile.gif

Don't forget to put something we would all sneer at but that people tend to like, i.e. white Zin

I think I already told this story on here but I'd did have a table (they were from Texas) that was beside themselves that we didn't have any white zin. Only a couple requests for it per year probably. People always ask for 14 hands around here. Or Kim Crawford.
post #19753 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

I think I already told this story on here but I'd did have a table (they were from Texas) that was beside themselves that we didn't have any white zin. Only a couple requests for it per year probably. People always ask for 14 hands around here. Or Kim Crawford.

Given your location I'm surprised Chateau Ste. Michelle is not commonly requested. It might get sold at gas stations but it's hard to argue their product isn't respectable at the price one pays for it.
post #19754 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Given your location I'm surprised Chateau Ste. Michelle is not commonly requested. It might get sold at gas stations but it's hard to argue their product isn't respectable at the price one pays for it.

14 Hands is another Ste. Michelle brand, and was built initially as an "on-premise only" brand, Merlot only to start, around 12 years ago or so. Now it's a million case brand. I remember their regional sales manager swearing to us that it was always going to be Merlot only, to highlight how well Merlot does in WA. Then came a Cab, and then a Chard. It's now WA's third largest brand behind Ste Michelle and Columbia Crest. I will say, however, that even though they own the top 3 brands, Ste Michelle is a great partner to the smaller local wineries, and will often supply them with grapes during difficult harvests.
post #19755 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisGold View Post

14 Hands is another Ste. Michelle brand, and was built initially as an "on-premise only" brand, Merlot only to start, around 12 years ago or so. Now it's a million case brand. I remember their regional sales manager swearing to us that it was always going to be Merlot only, to highlight how well Merlot does in WA. Then came a Cab, and then a Chard. It's now WA's third largest brand behind Ste Michelle and Columbia Crest. I will say, however, that even though they own the top 3 brands, Ste Michelle is a great partner to the smaller local wineries, and will often supply them with grapes during difficult harvests.

Did not know that. Pays to have folks in the wine industry posting here!


I had mentioned earlier about a 1.5 hour podcast on WA wines, can't remember if it was from Guild Somm or the one Levy what's-his-name does, but outside of being fascinating several of the growers/producers mentioned CSM with nothing but positive terms.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread