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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1298

post #19456 of 20847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Each to their own but I'm still going to chuckle at, "Let sit in decanter for 12 hours then poured back into bottle to finish slow ox'ing and drank the next day..."
Exactly. Just use a goddamn blender, duh.
post #19457 of 20847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I would think that if you're using Cellar Tracker you have the ability to age wine. Why would a person use CT unless they actually had enough wine that they needed the help to keep on up on their inventory. I get drinking some wine on the youngish side, as one's cellar matures and builds up a back inventory, but so many CT notes start off with silly (to me) references about rather odd decanting and then taking several days to finish the bottle. Who not only takes several days to finish a bottle but then comment on the bottle that's been open for three or more days? Well, the answer is, "A lot of people on CT."

Each to their own but I'm still going to chuckle at, "Let sit in decanter for 12 hours then poured back into bottle to finish slow ox'ing and drank the next day..."

I wasn't defending their actions - just reasons why I personally might drink a bottle a bit too early.

 

I do find the ultra-long-decanting and 5 day drinking same bottle pretty comical.

post #19458 of 20847
Auctions are a good way to access older wines fairly painlessly, specifically online auctions like Winebid.com. There's a learning curve for sure, but it can be a good way to get older wines, ready to drink, without having to shell out for case lot purchases.
post #19459 of 20847
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Streettrash View Post


I see this also. People don't have patience to cellar and bottle age wines it seems. I recall an incident of a friend opening a Cote Rotie far too soon once. It was so tanic. Much to his dismay I dumped mine in his counter top blender and whirled it up. When it had settled it was vastly improved.


As someone who just really began buying "ageworthy" wines in the past year or so, I can relate to the struggle. If you're starting with nothing in your cellar, it's inevitable that you're going to jump the gun every now and again!
yes, the struggle is real. Happens. My only gripe I suppose is when people "rate" wines like this. If a wine is that closed, giving it some air might open it up a bit, but the effect is going to be completely different from when a wine is allowed to sit in proper storage for 10, 15, 20 years.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I would think that if you're using Cellar Tracker you have the ability to age wine. Why would a person use CT unless they actually had enough wine that they needed the help to keep on up on their inventory. I get drinking some wine on the youngish side, as one's cellar matures and builds up a back inventory, but so many CT notes start off with silly (to me) references about rather odd decanting and then taking several days to finish the bottle. Who not only takes several days to finish a bottle but then comment on the bottle that's been open for three or more days? Well, the answer is, "A lot of people on CT."

Each to their own but I'm still going to chuckle at, "Let sit in decanter for 12 hours then poured back into bottle to finish slow ox'ing and drank the next day..."
91 points.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapa View Post

Auctions are a good way to access older wines fairly painlessly, specifically online auctions like Winebid.com. There's a learning curve for sure, but it can be a good way to get older wines, ready to drink, without having to shell out for case lot purchases.
Sotheby's also has decent mixed lots. Small verticles, some scoffed labels, and you can usually grab a partial case for a good price.

Well, it's a good price until they tack on 25% or whatever stupid amount they want.
post #19460 of 20847
post #19461 of 20847
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

As someone who just really began buying "ageworthy" wines in the past year or so, I can relate to the struggle. If you're starting with nothing in your cellar, it's inevitable that you're going to jump the gun every now and again!

Understandable. I'm in a similar boat. Been at it since 2013. The biggest portion of my cellar is stocked with 2010 Bordeauxs, Rhones, & Italians, 2012 Napa & Pac NW, and a hodgepodge of other vintages/regions that need more age. I really enjoy my wines with some age to them, so while the inevitable infaticide happens, I try to always have cellar defenders to thwart young kills.

A few areas I've found to be pretty worthy and reasonably priced "Cellar Defenders" are Riojas, Spanish Garnacha, west coast Pinot noirs, some Lower priced tuscan blends.

While I always decant my younger wines, it's usually a 45-90 minute ordeal. Once it goes in my decanter, it is going to be finished that evening.
post #19462 of 20847
Hosting a wine thing at our house Saturday. The couple with the biggest cellar asked if it was okay if they didn't bring any food and just brought extra wine. Hells yes.
post #19463 of 20847
Pios face when they bring Dat yellowtail to troll him
post #19464 of 20847
My gf asked me to find her a good Pinot Noir to get her grandmother as part of a Christmas present. Any advice on what I should look for? I'd be happiest sticking under $100 but no set in stone budget.
post #19465 of 20847
not to be a dick but I would go to K&L (aren't you near LA? Or is that kid nickels) and ask for recs (if you're not in LA I would go to whatever good wine store is near you). I would ask to speak to somebody knowledgeable about Pinot Noir and ask for something with some age. It's really hard to say what you have available near you at what prices and whether it would be a good deal. Probably more productive to ask for wine store recs here rather than wines themselves. Stocks and regional distribution fluctuate a lot except for maybe the big name stuff and I'm not sure you would want to drink those now.
post #19466 of 20847
No. Columbus, OH
post #19467 of 20847
does your grandma know a little about wine? If not, just spend $25 or $35 or whatever it is now on Au Bon Climat pinot + a bottle of decent Champagne. The Au Bon Climat is a consistently good, easy to find, and is an easy crowd pleaser (not to heavy, not too fruity, not too "dry", etc.)
post #19468 of 20847
Saintsbury is also not bad. I also like Mt. Eden and the Phelps pinot.

Or, try to get a Drouhin village level wine, some of those are under $50. They tend to need some age, though.
post #19469 of 20847
She doesn't know much about wine but it's part of a Christmas present so I'd be happier than not going for a higher end bottle that drinks well now than not
post #19470 of 20847
Get a bottle of Merry Edwards, Kosta Browne, Peay, Sanford, Williams Selyem, Ken Wright, Loring, A.P. Vin, Siduri, Kistler, Lynmar, Penner-Ash, Bethyl Heights or Kutch to name a handful that will make her happy. Make sure they have at least three years of bottle age.
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