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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1297

post #19441 of 20848
Cool! Interesting that we have a few of the same things. I need to drink more pinot and less syrah. Most of the reason I don't drink pinot is that it's not generally made in WA and also that I have no real understanding of what makes a good pinot, so I don't really want to spend the money on it if I can't appreciate it.
post #19442 of 20848
IMO the best way to come to appreciate a wine is to drink lots of it.
post #19443 of 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

IMO the best way to come to appreciate a wine is to drink lots of it.

Very true, it's just when it comes to actually spending money on wine, I'm much more likely to allocate my wine dollars to things that I have a good idea I will enjoy vs maybe trying a bunch of things to broaden my horizons. Such is a lot of life, I guess. With the typical Washington varietals it was easier to develop a palate because I get free exposure to a lot of those wines during work.

Also, correct me if I'm off base, but I am under the impression that relatively inexpensive pinot ($15-$20) doesn't have much in common with "expensive" pinot (over $30). Whereas I can think of a handful of inexpensive cabs and syrahs that have a good degree of commonality with more expensive wines.
post #19444 of 20848
Value priced Pinot can be tough.
post #19445 of 20848
Why would that be the case for Pinot alone?
post #19446 of 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Principle View Post

Why would that be the case for Pinot alone?

Other grapes are much easier to bring to a ripe, healthy harvest, and Pinot's issues are just beginning when it gets into the winery. It's just a different animal. Zinfandel has its issues in the field, but Cab / Merlot / Syrah tend to ripen easily and are much easier to work with.
post #19447 of 20848
Picked up a mixed case of bedrock, pretty stoked.
post #19448 of 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisGold View Post

Other grapes are much easier to bring to a ripe, healthy harvest, and Pinot's issues are just beginning when it gets into the winery. It's just a different animal. Zinfandel has its issues in the field, but Cab / Merlot / Syrah tend to ripen easily and are much easier to work with.


A wine-making colleague of mine once said, regarding a tough year: "Pinot, you bitch."
post #19449 of 20848

FYI - Best Wines Online/ Wine Exchange will apparently be doing a black friday/cyber monday sale.(don't have details yet, but if there is interest, I can post)

post #19450 of 20848

Was just gifted a bottle of 2010 Sine Qua Non The Monkey. I don't typically drink white, but I'll make an exception.

post #19451 of 20848
Why does every other Cellar Tracker tasting note read, "Decanted through a Vinturi and then returned to bottle to slow-ox. Had over five nights and..." with variations on that. Every time I read something like that I just think, "You're drinking the wine too young if you need to do all this oxidation."
post #19452 of 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Why does every other Cellar Tracker tasting note read, "Decanted through a Vinturi and then returned to bottle to slow-ox. Had over five nights and..." with variations on that. Every time I read something like that I just think, "You're drinking the wine too young if you need to do all this oxidation."


I see this also. People don't have patience to cellar and bottle age wines it seems. I recall an incident of a friend opening a Cote Rotie far too soon once. It was so tanic. Much to his dismay I dumped mine in his counter top blender and whirled it up. When it had settled it was vastly improved.

post #19453 of 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Streettrash View Post


I see this also. People don't have patience to cellar and bottle age wines it seems. I recall an incident of a friend opening a Cote Rotie far too soon once. It was so tanic. Much to his dismay I dumped mine in his counter top blender and whirled it up. When it had settled it was vastly improved.


As someone who just really began buying "ageworthy" wines in the past year or so, I can relate to the struggle. If you're starting with nothing in your cellar, it's inevitable that you're going to jump the gun every now and again!
post #19454 of 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post


As someone who just really began buying "ageworthy" wines in the past year or so, I can relate to the struggle. If you're starting with nothing in your cellar, it's inevitable that you're going to jump the gun every now and again!

This.

post #19455 of 20848
I would think that if you're using Cellar Tracker you have the ability to age wine. Why would a person use CT unless they actually had enough wine that they needed the help to keep on up on their inventory. I get drinking some wine on the youngish side, as one's cellar matures and builds up a back inventory, but so many CT notes start off with silly (to me) references about rather odd decanting and then taking several days to finish the bottle. Who not only takes several days to finish a bottle but then comment on the bottle that's been open for three or more days? Well, the answer is, "A lot of people on CT."

Each to their own but I'm still going to chuckle at, "Let sit in decanter for 12 hours then poured back into bottle to finish slow ox'ing and drank the next day..."
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