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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1286

post #19276 of 20671
Does this apply to sister barbaresco?
post #19277 of 20671
I am hosting a gathering at my apartment where I will be pairing classical music and wine. I am looking for a red burg (will be paired with the Beethoven triple concerto) and a white burg (for the Academic Festival). Looking to spend about $50 per bottle and wine needs to be ready to drink.

Any ideas?
post #19278 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Principle View Post

Does this apply to sister barbaresco?

Not typically, should soften in around half the time as Barolo, but obviously this varies from producer to producer. There are many more that are drinkable very early on.
post #19279 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axelman 17 View Post

I am hosting a gathering at my apartment where I will be pairing classical music and wine. I am looking for a red burg (will be paired with the Beethoven triple concerto) and a white burg (for the Academic Festival). Looking to spend about $50 per bottle and wine needs to be ready to drink.

Any ideas?

this is a total Manton question.

For the Heiliger Dankgesang, maybe start with a Tequila hangover and work it from there?
post #19280 of 20671

Can someone described to me what it means for a wine to be 'flabby' or 'spent'?

 

Edit: two different phrases decribing different things, interested nonetheless

 

I had a 20 year old Riesling a few days ago with a french couple and they rambled on about how the wine was past its prime.


Edited by Principle - 10/20/15 at 7:41pm
post #19281 of 20671
Ripe, crisp and clean. Serious oolong tea notes, goes down real smoothly
post #19282 of 20671
If I really liked Tignanello, anything I should try that's similar (and more readily available)? Thanks in advance!
post #19283 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krish the Fish View Post

If I really liked Tignanello, anything I should try that's similar (and more readily available)? Thanks in advance!

MARCHESE ANTINORI Chianti Classico Riserva - nicknamed "baby Tignanello", it's also got a nice dollop of Cabernet, similar vilification and often shares the same flavor profile.
post #19284 of 20671
Oh man sounds right down my alley, might get a couple bottles of it and Tignanello for Thanksgiving... and for myself naturally
post #19285 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Barolo needs at least 15 years.

/Slewfoot

Infanticide!

/Manton
post #19286 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axelman 17 View Post

I am hosting a gathering at my apartment where I will be pairing classical music and wine. I am looking for a red burg (will be paired with the Beethoven triple concerto) and a white burg (for the Academic Festival). Looking to spend about $50 per bottle and wine needs to be ready to drink.

Any ideas?

this is such a hard question because who knows what shops near you stock what wines.

i think it'd be best to find a shop with somebody super knowledgeable. otherwise the big negociants tend to have good value especially in the lower range (the SF wine people think bouchard pere et fils and faively is good for reds and jadot is most suited to whites). also it's harder to find nowadays but the big name domaines like ramonet, leroy, the ponsots, and the gros family have basic appellation level wines that are in the $30-50 range and are more suited for consumption now. a lot of them also make wines in cheaper villages that are very good.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Principle View Post

Can someone described to me what it means for a wine to be 'flabby' or 'spent'?

Edit: two different phrases decribing different things, interested nonetheless

I had a 20 year old Riesling a few days ago with a french couple and they rambled on about how the wine was past its prime.

try leaving a wine open for 2, 3 days. that's what i think of when i see flabby or spent. i'm not sure what exactly the oxygen does, but wines taste fruitier with less structure
post #19287 of 20671
I could be wrong but isn't "flabby" usually used to describe a wine that is highly/overly concentrated while simultaneously lacking structure and acidity?
post #19288 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I could be wrong but isn't "flabby" usually used to describe a wine that is highly/overly concentrated while simultaneously lacking structure and acidity?

Correct, especially the lack of acidity.
post #19289 of 20671
Maybe we're thinking the same things just expressing it differently?
post #19290 of 20671
Anyone in LA/OC recommend a good wine shop?

@foodguy
@lawyerdad
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