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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1284

post #19246 of 20671
I was expecting a lot of structure on this, but it was really pleasant and well rounded! Jammy, silky tannins with good body for a Pinot noir. Had this with lemon-mustard brussel sprout hash and roasted broccoli.
post #19247 of 20671
Why were you expecting a lot of structure?
post #19248 of 20671

I've come to understand one possible demarcation of oenology to be new and old school production methods, with older methods from older vineyards producing more structured wines that warrant cellaring.

post #19249 of 20671
While I love semi-dry Riesling and prefer it to dry-dry, I am not into semi-dry Vouvray. Thank God I have only one more bottle.
post #19250 of 20671
Cork was spongy and I just knew it was going to break. Got out the nub okay though. Just letting it open up for 30 minutes as we've got some guests coming over for wine and nosh.

post #19251 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

Does she actually like her own wines? Or does she mostly just stick to beer?

It was so boring I fell asleep in the middle of it. Woke up and she was saying how they never decant their wines

I feel like even if I were the son of Aubert de Villaine I would get tired of drinking DRC if I've been drinking it my whole life. Also beer in the states is awesome.

And yeah she probably doesn't like her wines. I'm thinking her dad made her come out to a event in philly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Principle View Post

I've come to understand one possible demarcation of oenology to be new and old school production methods, with older methods from older vineyards producing more structured wines that warrant cellaring.

IME older vines don't necessarily have more structure. they taste more extracted and concentrated. There really isn't a binary older method of production and younger method of production. There's a long continuum with lots of variables.
post #19252 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Cork was spongy and I just knew it was going to break. Got out the nub okay though.


Edited by erictheobscure - 10/17/15 at 11:21pm
post #19253 of 20671
So the Bord was great. Smooth, refined, fruit present but not in your face. A really nice drinking wine.

Also opened a great Pouilly-Fuissé which was just so good. Old world, flinty, mineral, crab apples, so good. Also opened two 100% Grenache to compare side by side. 2011 Booker The Ripper and 2010 Bodegas Alto Moncayo. The old world was way darker and full of new oak vanilla. The Booker more floral and fruity, easier to drink but surprisingly had more tannins.

We also committed a bit of vinfanticide but the person that brought it has a case and just wanted to check in:





Stewed prunes, jammy, dark and intense. A decade from now this is going to kill.
post #19254 of 20671
As expected it was fruity and jammy but also a fairly prominent eucalyptus/menthol note I was not overly happy with. Peppery and star anise too.


post #19255 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

So the Bord was great. Smooth, refined, fruit present but not in your face. A really nice drinking wine.

Also opened a great Pouilly-Fuissé which was just so good. Old world, flinty, mineral, crab apples, so good. Also opened two 100% Grenache to compare side by side. 2011 Booker The Ripper and 2010 Bodegas Alto Moncayo. The old world was way darker and full of new oak vanilla. The Booker more floral and fruity, easier to drink but surprisingly had more tannins.
 

I looooove Alto Moncayo.  Was the Haut Bages Liberal stored climate/humidity controlled?  That seems a little young for a failing cork

post #19256 of 20671
I've been on a Pinot kick. I've heard a lot about this winery in passing and decided to grab a bottle. Fruit forward with chocolate notes on the finish. A half-chode against that David Bruce.
post #19257 of 20671
Just sold for over $300 million.
post #19258 of 20671
What a chump. I paid $11.95 for a 375cl on my last trans-con flight.
post #19259 of 20671
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Principle View Post

I've come to understand one possible demarcation of oenology to be new and old school production methods, with older methods from older vineyards producing more structured wines that warrant cellaring.

IME older vines don't necessarily have more structure. they taste more extracted and concentrated. There really isn't a binary older method of production and younger method of production. There's a long continuum with lots of variables.

old vines don't mean shit if you decide to pick every grape, good and bad, from the vine and use that to make wine. Yield management, people.
post #19260 of 20671
That's a good point. If vine management and sorting is carefully done tho I feel like older vines taste more concentrated

Are there wineries that harvest haphazardly using old vines? I feel like if a winery is going to commit to old vines they're more likely to pick carefully
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