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The Official Wine Thread - Page 116

post #1726 of 21081
^ I was very impressed with Ridge and will continue to buy.
post #1727 of 21081
cellaring wine is great fun. i got into it in the mid '80s, my first big vintage was '82, though at that time i could still pick up '79s and '81s (and much cheaper). i still buy wine, but not nearly as much -- i've maxed out my 750-bottle cabinet and everything i buy, i have to drink one of something else. a couple of thoughts on cellaring: 1) i like what a lot of you are doing in buying half-cases and cases of single wines. that's a much better approach than buying singles or doubles. the rewarding part of cellaring (in addition to having something nice to pull for dinner) is learning how a wine changes over time. with a half-case you can open a bottle a year and if you make notes, you'll see the maturation. 2) Before you get too enthusiastic, remember that as you learn more about wine, your tastes will probably change. Typically, people start out with big wines because they are easier to appreciate, then move on to wines of more subtlety ... the much-commented Bordeaux to Burgundy transition. This isn't to say that Bordeaux lack subtlety, just a warning that not to fill your cellar immediately when in 10 years you may wish you'd bought something else. 3) all wines are not for cellaring, but that doesn't mean that these aren't wines to be enjoyed. sometimes wine geeks become like baseball card collectors ... they focus on the rarities they own rather than the pleasure they get from drinking wine. By all means, chase that monopole Burgundy, but don't lose sight of the everyday pleasures of a great Beaujolais (or Chianti, or Barbera, etc.). 4) it's better to under-age wines than to over-age them. What I mean by that is its better to drink a wine too young than too old. Drink a wine before it's peak and it's still great. Drink a wine past its peak and it's not so much. I don't mean you should start killing your babies, but don't wait until they're senile to enjoy them, either.
post #1728 of 21081
thing about NYC is, it's not about something existing (because it damn sure does here), it's a matter of finding it and then getting it.

I wonder if Wine Library's groumet department has any, I might trek over there at the end of the month.
post #1729 of 21081
I try not to drink california wines because it makes me want to go out to cali. I'm dying to get out to napa/sonoma/cyrus this summer but don't know if I'm going to be able to get off of work.
post #1730 of 21081
foodguy, agree with all of what you say, particularly that your tastes will change over time and particularly if you continue to experiment and expand what you try. Last year, thanks to Merry Edward SB, I started trying more whites. On our Healdsburg trip, I pretty much ignored pinots (my favorite varietal) at the tasting rooms, and tried Zins and Chards. I came back with over a case of Chards and two makers that I now am in love with (Lynmar and Marrimar Torres).
post #1731 of 21081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
You can easily get foie and even truffles -- white or black, Italian or French, in season.

speaking of truffles, this reminds me of dinner at Johnny's. Sit down and a waiter will lovingly display a vat of fresh truffles in front of you as part of an appetizer course.
post #1732 of 21081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post
I try not to drink california wines because it makes me want to go out to cali. I'm dying to get out to napa/sonoma/cyrus this summer but don't know if I'm going to be able to get off of work.

if in doubt, give the Finger Lakes a shot for a weekend
post #1733 of 21081
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
3) all wines are not for cellaring, but that doesn't mean that these aren't wines to be enjoyed. sometimes wine geeks become like baseball card collectors ... they focus on the rarities they own rather than the pleasure they get from drinking wine. By all means, chase that monopole Burgundy, but don't lose sight of the everyday pleasures of a great Beaujolais (or Chianti, or Barbera, etc.)

Due to my paltry storage space, I do much more everyday drinking than collecting. It's still wonderful, but a 48 bottle unit would be a whole lot of happy.
post #1734 of 21081
I have suffered significant heartbreak from cellaring wines too long. But I still won't stop. What's the phrase that drug addicts use? "Chasing the dragon"? A perfectly aged bottle is so unlike, and so much better than, even the best wine still on its way up that every time I experience it, I start thinking about the next time.

So I will leave it to you overcautious losers to play it safe with the young wines.
post #1735 of 21081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have suffered significant heartbreak from cellaring wines too long. But I still won't stop. What's the phrase that drug addicts use? "Chasing the dragon"? A perfectly aged bottle is so unlike, and so much better than, even the best wine still on its way up that every time I experience it, I start thinking about the next time.

So I will leave it to you overcautious losers to play it safe with the young wines.

that's why it's a good idea to buy in multiples. hedge your bets. i just opened an '85 salon le mesnil for new year's eve that was dead. last year's '85 la grande dame was one of the great champagnes i've ever drunk. of course, i'm not enough of a big-timer to have invested in cases of either ....
post #1736 of 21081
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
that's why it's a good idea to buy in multiples. hedge your bets. i just opened an '85 salon le mesnil for new year's eve that was dead. last year's '85 la grande dame was one of the great champagnes i've ever drunk. of course, i'm not enough of a big-timer to have invested in cases of either ....

Salon dead as in not a whole lot of bubbles or dead as in rotten? I'm a big fan of Champagne that is nearly still wine, but not spoiled.
post #1737 of 21081
Barolo has arrived. You pop one yet Gome?
post #1738 of 21081
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
Salon dead as in not a whole lot of bubbles or dead as in rotten? I'm a big fan of Champagne that is nearly still wine, but not spoiled.

not a whole lot of bubbles, certainly, but maderized to an unpleasant extent. i think the fault is that is bdb and just too delicate for aging. champagnes with more pn seem to age well ... well, some of them. i remember a tasting of krugs that went back to the 50s (don't recall whether they were recently disgorged or had been cellared). awesome, awesome wines.
post #1739 of 21081
I have very limited experience with old vintage champagne, but I have found that even in the best bottles, the bubbles fade even as the flavors improve. My father once had a lot of '71s, '75s and '76s, and this happened to all of them that I tasted.
post #1740 of 21081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have very limited experience with old vintage champagne, but I have found that even in the best bottles, the bubbles fade even as the flavors improve. My father once had a lot of '71s, '75s and '76s, and this happened to all of them that I tasted.

You are a lucky man, having grown up in such a household.
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