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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1130

post #16936 of 17900

I believe the latter.  We also stayed in a bello agriturismo the owner of which had a brother with a local vineyard producing heavily proportioned 'prugnolo gentile' (at least 80% I'd say), served every night. The flavors were comparable to the  shop bought. Before drinking this I hardly touched chianti; now I never do.

post #16937 of 17900
but Vino Nobile de Montepulciano and Chianti are very similar.
post #16938 of 17900

I was being subtly snobbish. :blush:

Accepted that the grape content and terroir similar.

post #16939 of 17900
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post #16940 of 17900
Opened the Russiz Superiore Col Disôre '08 yesterday. I'm not sure whether I like it a lot. Definitely not an easy wine. Tart and the 14% are noticeable. I don't think I can recommend it for the 33 € retail. Neither for the 16 € I''ve paid. I have another bottle, maybe it'll fare better.

10148-00_russiz-superiore-col-disore-2008.jpg
post #16941 of 17900


Had with grilled steak, baked Brussels, and caramelized onions.
post #16942 of 17900

With regards to opening a bottle of wine that's been kept ageing on it's side for many years...

What is the rule of thumb for taking appropriate measures to ensure the tannins have fully rested to the bottom of the bottle?

I.e. should one be interested in keeping the bottle upright for a day before opening a bottle that is 5 years old, 8 years?, 10+ years?, etc.

post #16943 of 17900
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Michael View Post

With regards to opening a bottle of wine that's been kept ageing on it's side for many years...
What is the rule of thumb for taking appropriate measures to ensure the tannins have fully rested to the bottom of the bottle?
I.e. should one be interested in keeping the bottle upright for a day before opening a bottle that is 5 years old, 8 years?, 10+ years?, etc.

Not "tannins" - you're referring to sediment. And the amount, if any, sediment, depends on the wine. You can deal with sediment many ways. Just standing a bottle up for an hour or so might do it- but if you then pour con gusto you'll stir them up again, etc etc...
post #16944 of 17900
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post


Not "tannins" - you're referring to sediment. And the amount, if any, sediment, depends on the wine. You can deal with sediment many ways. Just standing a bottle up for an hour or so might do it- but if you then pour con gusto you'll stir them up again, etc etc...

Right, sediment is originated from tannin polymers in a wine, that eventually fall out of the liquid. But what would a typical age be for a tannic wine, (ex. Cab Sauv, Amarone, Barolo, Brunello, etc.) for it to start developing this unwanted sediment? I'm thinking 8 years to be safe...

post #16945 of 17900
It's not just tannins tho so referring the sediment as tannins would not be right. It's mostly tartrate crystals with some phenolic polymers of which tannins are only a small part

Also it's not just about the age. There's a broad range of time which depends on how much tartrate and phenolic compounds were in the wine to begin with which in part is determined by whether or not the winemaker used fining, filtration, and cold stabilization. I don't think you can just say 8 years although I'm sure there is research out there on this
post #16946 of 17900

I'm referencing that the sediment (in aged wine) is commonly from the tannin polymers (and yes, other solid matter), which is also encouraged by the certain filtration process (as I understand less filtration allows greater potential for complexity to develop in the wine).

I'll have to do a little more digging...

post #16947 of 17900
I have many unfiltered, unfined wines in my cellar that have significant sediment at three and four years. Here's a crazy thought: look at the bottle of wine and use your observation in the decision making process.

Also, since you are specifically talking about aged wine, here's another perspective: http://guides.wsj.com/wine/learning-about-and-enjoying-wine/should-i-decant/
post #16948 of 17900

A valid point. Unfortunately my eye sight is not great, so I cannot always tell when looking at the bottle, especially those with very dark tinting.

But thanks for the suggestion.

post #16949 of 17900
post #16950 of 17900
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Michael View Post

A valid point. Unfortunately my eye sight is not great, so I cannot always tell when looking at the bottle, especially those with very dark tinting.
But thanks for the suggestion.
NSIS...

Just look at it through a bright light. Easy to see.

An old somm trick, now done by some tableside more for the theater of it is to pour the wine with the neck over a candle so you can see as the bottle empties and sediment approaches.

Sediment doesn't bother me--- it settles in the glass quickly... if you're fussy about it, just pour it through a filter rather than trying to solve the Gordian Knot.
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