or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Wine Thread - Page 1044

post #15646 of 17667
I enjoyed the '06, but I don't remember being as enthusiastic as you about it. Maybe I'd think differently now than back then.

I've read that Barbera d'Alba isn't always suited for extended cellaring. Yet I still bought a bottle of '98 (Superiore) Mascarelo Codana. What can I expect?
post #15647 of 17667
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

I've read that Barbera d'Alba isn't always suited for extended cellaring.
not usually. Really depends on the producer as some make them with the intention of drinking young, while others can make them last.
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

What can I expect?
not sure. You'll have to report to us.
post #15648 of 17667
I will. Rather sooner than later. Thanks.
post #15649 of 17667
speaking of best wines. i am curious as to what you guys would consider the best (or some of the best) wines you've had? also what's the experience that really got you into wines?


the one experience i can think of that made me really delve into wines is that intro sommelier class i took at the cia. the wine tasting lead by master sommeliers was very enlightening and made me actually believe in tasting notes. i was amazed that you could actually guess the varietal, year, and region the wine is from. i had thought that was something you only saw in manga or movies.
post #15650 of 17667
DRC La Tache was probably the best.
post #15651 of 17667
I got into wines because I thought it would make me cool (did not work).

Best...one that pops to mind as a true gem was a 76 Château Leoville Las Cases. It was the wine that gave me a Mantonian appreciation of aged Bordeaux.
post #15652 of 17667
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

DRC La Tache was probably the best.

Asshole.

The one I remember most was a 1998 (IIRC) Truchot Morey St Denis. This was a couple of years ago and was probably the biggest contributor to my getting deeper into wine. I'm still a rookie compared to most of the people in this thread, so no super impressive 30 yr old DRCs for me.
post #15653 of 17667
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I got into wines because I thought it would make me cool (did not work).

Seems to have, from what I've seen. Either that or you were born into it. Hopefully the cultivation of a taste in wine will make me more willing to keep trying things I've previously questioned the general purpose of or reason behind.

post #15654 of 17667
39633E53-09F4-4E88-A634-2E242006E3F3-8162-0000052680726D72_zps8b5d3d5c.jpgDidn't care for the above Bourgogne. The Camarsac was good. Below is the Rascal Pinot. Strangely it has no vintage marked on the bottle or the cork.
C7E1F433-D059-4A3D-AA24-4C9A7C8E178F-8162-0000052685F44A33_zps127eda97.jpg
post #15655 of 17667
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

not usually. Really depends on the producer as some make them with the intention of drinking young, while others can make them last.
not sure. You'll have to report to us.
Follow-up question. My experience with older wines is nonexistent. I suppose a 15-year-old wine might have some sediments. Given that the wine is likely past its prime, and definitely fragile, I suppose a slow decant in a narrow container is the safest bet (the decanter I own has a wide base, so I suppose decanting in a clean wine bottle is the optimal choice)? Or would you leave it in the bottle from the very beginning and carefully pour out?

Moreover, given that it was shipped and arrived today, are 24-30 hours enough to settle the sediments on the bottom (again, assuming that there's a large amount of it)?
post #15656 of 17667
I have had wines from 2005 with sediment. Sediment isn't always just on very old wines. I also feel that decanting is somewhat unrelated to sediment. Decanting puts more of the wine in contact with air so it opens up faster. On the other hand I have had no issues pouring an older wine with sediment and just being mindful of how to pour it so the sediment gets caught in the shoulder of the bottle.

Also, I feel sediment falls to the bottom of the bottle rather quickly. I would say a day is more than enough for it to settle. I drank a 76' Baychevelle the day I bought it and poured it when I got home with no issues until the last glass.
post #15657 of 17667
Yeah, I just had a two-year-old wine with sediments (likely because it was unfiltered). I'll probably leave it in the bottle and pour carefully. Maybe through cheesecloth.
post #15658 of 17667
What I would do in this case is decant to what you have, go rinse the bottle, and put it back in the bottle immediately and drink.
post #15659 of 17667
That was the other option, yeah. If I do it, I'll directly decant it in another clean bottle so I have one less pour, i.e. much less contact with oxygen.
post #15660 of 17667
Even better and you can let the bottle air dry overnight so there's zero water in it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread