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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1041

post #15601 of 18181

Plus, the more you drink the more you palette will change, so it's a great hobby! 

post #15602 of 18181

I noticed that with whiskey, at first it was just strong which I liked. After a while it was still strong but also I felt more of the actual taste, be it hints of vanilla, pear, or whatever else. I look forward to thoroughly enjoying wine as you all do!

post #15603 of 18181

You will find the same experience with wine as with fine whiskey.  Enjoy!

post #15604 of 18181
Thread Starter 
Some lovely wine this week. Dinner party at friends, dinner at our fav bistro (Chianti Classico Res), and a winter tasting (brrrr) with visiting US friends.

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post #15605 of 18181
Quote:
Originally Posted by audiophilia View Post

In New York City in April.

Need recs for a wine bar with good glass/flight selections near the New York Palace Hotel. 455 Madison. Thx.

You are not far from the Modern on 52nd street. Not a wine bar but has a huge bar with a very well done (IMO, at least) selection.
post #15606 of 18181

Had a little party this afternoon with a bunch of food, none of which goes with any of these wines: caviar, with blinis, creme fraiche and chives, boudin, chicken and sausage gumbo, and bacon and onion confit quiche. From left to right: 97 Geyserville which was surprisingly lovely at 15 years of age, clearly showing its breeding, still representing Zinfandel, not quite moving into the typical Ridge claret category but rich even at this advanced age. 1985 Montebello: ready to go, mature, but still rich and drained quickly after being opened for a couple of hours. I was surprised at how many "novice" wine drinkers liked this. 86 Haut Brion: just right in the sweet spot for me, mature, but gaining weight and sweetness as it opened, again, drained by folks I would have expected to gravitate to younger wines....like the 09 Rivers Marie Occidental Ridge Pinot noir. Also very good, but obviously different in character from the others. I've gone out of order, but the 00 Zind Humbrecht Heimbourg Pinot Gris SGN, which was rich, unctuous, and great with cheese cake. All the way to the right was the 96 Jacquesson Rose, in magnum, which was perfect with the caviar. We also had a MV Krug, which was sublime, and a very old MV Krug, which was cooked and taste like creme brûlée. (Pictured below)

post #15607 of 18181
cry.gif on the old Krug. That looks awful.



the other wines look awesome, though.
post #15608 of 18181
The color actually wasn't bad, considering that wine was probably from the early 80s/late 70s, and I love old Champagne. What was disturbing was the caramelized wine around the capsule, which was a chore to remove. I was bummed, as I have a few more bottles from that lot.
post #15609 of 18181
Rascal Pinot Noir from Oregon. Amazing for $15.
post #15610 of 18181
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axelman 17 View Post

You are not far from the Modern on 52nd street. Not a wine bar but has a huge bar with a very well done (IMO, at least) selection.

thx
post #15611 of 18181
After having that Bandol last week I did a little reading on it. Sounds like they're under pressure to stop with the heavy Mourvedre wines and make more "international style" wines. IMO, that would be a shame. I'm not a Parker basher (I say this as IMO when talk of "international style" wine comes up the next sentence is usually to bemoan his influence) but think it would be a shame if the wine world lost those little pockets of individuality.
post #15612 of 18181
I thought the designation required a certain amount of Mourvedre. They are thinking of changing this %?
post #15613 of 18181
They require 50% Mourvèdre.

I've been at dinner with a few American, Italian and Spanish makers lately and he hall have brought up this "pressure to be more international" in style and most, not all, were kinda cranky about it.
post #15614 of 18181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

They require 50% Mourvèdre.

I've been at dinner with a few American, Italian and Spanish makers lately and he hall have brought up this "pressure to be more international" in style and most, not all, were kinda cranky about it.

The one I had was 100% and my fear is they'll do one of two things. Either add a bunch of really ripe Grenache or go the "Super Tuscan" route.
post #15615 of 18181
What is the super tuscan route?
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