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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1034

post #15496 of 18059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I was half joking, it's very cheap (well under $10 for a 375) but IMO a terrific value, I love it.

Interesting, never tried it. Will have to pick up a bottle.
post #15497 of 18059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace View Post

I love them, particularly if they have enough acid to make them less like honey syrup. Yours sounds great though. I've never had the Clos Jesbal but I love ZH so I'll have to try it.
I too prefer acid, which i find is a defining characteristic of the Loire/Alsace sweet wines. It also makes my love of the Pazjos and the ZH Clos Jebsal odd. They both have a ton of sugar, but aren't cloying and have a mouthfeel that is really light, but still rich. It doesn't make any sense really.
post #15498 of 18059
Quote:
Originally Posted by tattersall View Post

Probably one of my favorite producers now - I don't know about the 'S' bottling but I really like the weissburgunder and grauburgunders from Donnhoff - we had these two recently over dinner and didn't find them oaky in the least - maybe the age allowed them to integrate? Nevertheless, really enjoyable whites and very food friendly:
Had the Weißburgunder today. Very enjoyable indeed. 2011 though. Also received their Grauburgunder, Weißburgunder S, Grauburgunder S, Riesling, Tonschiefer Riesling, Höllenpfad Riesling and Dellchen Riesling GG today. All very young -- 2011-- but I'm sure they'll still be good to great (and likely even better with some more age -- which I will hand off to others to judge). BTW, Dönnhoff's Hermannshöhle Riesling GG has won the anaual "Riesling Cup" (blind tasting by an international jury, presented by Der Feinschmecker -- a decent German foodie/wine magazine -- of the newest Riesling releases of 400 wineries in Germany), Dönnhoff's third victory in a row. Here's the Top 14.
post #15499 of 18059
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Had the Weißburgunder today. Very enjoyable indeed. 2011 though. Also received their Grauburgunder, Weißburgunder S, Grauburgunder S, Riesling, Tonschiefer Riesling, Höllenpfad Riesling and Dellchen Riesling GG today. All very young -- 2011-- but I'm sure they'll still be good to great (and likely even better with some more age -- which I will hand off to others to judge). BTW, Dönnhoff's Hermannshöhle Riesling GG has won the anaual "Riesling Cup" (blind tasting by an international jury, presented by Der Feinschmecker -- a decent German foodie/wine magazine -- of the newest Riesling releases of 400 wineries in Germany), Dönnhoff's third victory in a row. Here's the Top 14.

That is an awesome Dönnhoff haul icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

The Hermannshoehle GG is indeed a fantastic bottle. One of my favorites--we buy some every year. Just drank a bottle of the 2010 recently. It was excellent--perfectly balanced, had more RS than I expected, but it was just enough to keep the big 2010 acid in check. So wonderful.
post #15500 of 18059
If I see any, I'll grab some. It was already sold out where I ordered, unfortunately.
post #15501 of 18059
Wow - that is a lot of Donnhoff love!
post #15502 of 18059


Probably not easy to find outside of British Columbia, but here is a good example of what this emerging region can offer: a cool weather white with nice acidity for around $20.
post #15503 of 18059
If anybody in here sees a bottle of Buty Syrah/Cab blend, buy it. Some of the best Washington has to offer, IMO.

http://www.butywinery.com/index.cfm?method=products.productDrilldown&productid=b80ed80f-ea6b-52b5-8acf-451cf43abced&pageID=dce58d00-2264-112b-b1bc-f7b29b5935ad&sortBy=DisplayOrder&

Have had both the 2008 and 2009. Both were superb.
post #15504 of 18059
I was thinking about something the other day. I remember in a college economics class my professor was teaching us about economic substitutes and how if the price of say budwiser increases it will increase quantity sold of other similar drinks (coors, etc). She also mentioned how an increase in the price of wine would make people substitute beer for wine. I remember arguing with her that it doesn't make sense, because wine isn't just a commodity and it depends on what the consumer is aiming for. I would think a drunk would start buying vodka because it could get them drunk cheaper. I don't know any wine lover who would suddenly start drinking beer because the price got too high. Totally different thing, imo.
post #15505 of 18059
Here's one to throw you all, a Cab. Sauv. from the Südtirol Alto Adige:

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post #15506 of 18059
That's interesting... How was it?
post #15507 of 18059
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I was thinking about something the other day. I remember in a college economics class my professor was teaching us about economic substitutes and how if the price of say budwiser increases it will increase quantity sold of other similar drinks (coors, etc). She also mentioned how an increase in the price of wine would make people substitute beer for wine. I remember arguing with her that it doesn't make sense, because wine isn't just a commodity and it depends on what the consumer is aiming for. I would think a drunk would start buying vodka because it could get them drunk cheaper. I don't know any wine lover who would suddenly start drinking beer because the price got too high. Totally different thing, imo.
Yeah, it's just a model. Obviously there are always exceptions in real life, so generalizing assumptions are made.
post #15508 of 18059
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I was thinking about something the other day. I remember in a college economics class my professor was teaching us about economic substitutes and how if the price of say budwiser increases it will increase quantity sold of other similar drinks (coors, etc). She also mentioned how an increase in the price of wine would make people substitute beer for wine. I remember arguing with her that it doesn't make sense, because wine isn't just a commodity and it depends on what the consumer is aiming for. I would think a drunk would start buying vodka because it could get them drunk cheaper. I don't know any wine lover who would suddenly start drinking beer because the price got too high. Totally different thing, imo.

Wine and beer aren't perfect substitutes, but that doesn't mean that there isn't a substitution effect. Also, most wine sold in this country or others is not the kind you find people talking about on Styleforum. It is just low alcohol alcohol, similar to beer.
post #15509 of 18059
That's true.
post #15510 of 18059
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

That's interesting... How was it?

Drinking now - very good actually. Surprisingly light in body considering the 13.5% ABV, not as heavy, or intensely deep for that matter, as the higher end cabs they make very well here in Veneto (which are also some of my favs.). To use a few cliches, slightly earthy, jam / blackcurrant, silky, good long finish. Not as "corposo" as the chap in the wine shop said, but then again I consider Amarone full bodied.

I was really hoping to get something with a more French flavour due to the severe lack of any affordable French wine available in Italy and I suppose this would be it. Very good for €11.50.

However, I'm really enjoying drinking wine from Trentino / Alto Adige / Südtirol (whatever you want to call it...) at the moment and if I see it I'll get it and try it out. After having cycled through it quite a few times it really is perfect wine growing territory. I think it has a bit of a minor rep. here which means that you can buy a good bottle without paying for the hype - same for anything not valpolicella based in Veneto.
Edited by Ich_Dien - 2/21/13 at 11:01am
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