or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Wine Thread - Page 1030

post #15436 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

That's very interesting as Bordeaux is not exactly known for making high alcohol wines.

It's 13% alcohol. Not sure if I'm just not able to describe the taste. It didn't taste like super high alcohol content, that was just the closest experience I had. The port I've had and enjoyed is 20% for example and it didn't have this feeling. With the port, it was like the flavors masked and blended with the alcohol hints at the end where as in the beginning with this bord, there was no real taste/flavor presenting at all for the first glass and a half.

I just didn't know if this was my taste being unaccustomed to wine, or if it was the wine itself that opened up vs my taste buds.

Thanks everyone do far for your insight, keep it coming!
post #15437 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmericanGent View Post

That bile-ish tart flavor is a normal think when you open a bottle- if it persists after waiting then you have a bad bottle, but it's not going to happen that often. 
Decanting can be done for any wine but for your lower end stuff I don't find it as needed.  For a better bottle I'll decant 1-2 hours. 

As mentioned above- no need to spend that much on wine until you have a better idea of what you like.  I'd start with easy drinking wines like Louis M. Martini cabernet and Mark West pinot noir.  You will be able to drink wines in the 12-15 dollar section for years and really built your palette.  Just grab a bottle or two every weekend and take pictures on your iphone and make notes about your opinions.  Don't worry about all the fancy jargon- just a few notes.  (Speaking of Jargon- that's a decent starter wine too!)

Welcome to the best part of the rest of your life!

At what point would you say it's worth decanting? Also, is just letting the bottle sit open for awhile good enough if I'm not worried about sediment?
post #15438 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powertrip View Post


At what point would you say it's worth decanting? Also, is just letting the bottle sit open for awhile good enough if I'm not worried about sediment?


I am not sure to be honest, but I decant anything I spend more than $30 on.  The benefit of a decanter is that it spreads the wine out over a larger area so it works better than just opening a bottle, but yes, you can just open a bottle a few hours before dinner, then pour and wait a few minutes.  Sediment is not usually an issue until you get into older wines.

I'm sure there are some folks here with more experience with the pricier wines- I rarely spend over $20 and have never spent over $60 or $70.  Some cats here spent $200. on a bottle so I'm sure they know better how to treat the high-end stuff.

post #15439 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmericanGent View Post

[...] but I decant anything I spend more than $30 on.
That sounds strange.

From what I understand, when decanting old wines because of their sediment, the decanter should be narrow, since the wine won't handle the oxygen very well, whereas a younger, tight wine can quickly develop with some oxygen, hence you want a large surface area, a decanter with a wide base. Decanting with the purpose of getting rid of sediments and avoid contact with oxygen as opposed to getting oxygen into the wine.

If you want the wine to breath, a decanter with a wide base will work better, or say quicker, than leaving it in the bottle. Also: you don't need anything fancy, a simple, sturdy decanter will do. In the meanwhile, you could also use something like your Chemex, in case you have one, or similarly shaped objects.

In case you prefer to present the wine in its bottle, you could also pour the wine into a decanter, clean the bottle if there's sediments, and pour it back. The pouring itself will speed things up as opposed to just letting it breath in the bottle.
Has anyone tried the hyper decanting yet?
post #15440 of 18178
eh. Solid.

post #15441 of 18178
2007 Produttori tonight. Took forever to start showing. Solid but not sure it'd be any better in a few years.
post #15442 of 18178
08 Peay Pommarium Pinot tonight. Very nice. Elegant.

Also, Booker release. Eric is a friend and he makes me laugh. He also makes pretty good wine.
post #15443 of 18178


Pretty good. Could be great around 2017.
post #15444 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Has anyone tried the hyper decanting yet?

Raping it with a hand blender? No, not yet.

I decant a lot of wines, but I usually tend towards the tannic grapes. I think it makes a big difference. Makes a $10 bottle taste $12.
post #15445 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post


That sounds strange.

From what I understand, when decanting old wines because of their sediment, the decanter should be narrow, since the wine won't handle the oxygen very well, whereas a younger, tight wine can quickly develop with some oxygen, hence you want a large surface area, a decanter with a wide base. Decanting with the purpose of getting rid of sediments and avoid contact with oxygen as opposed to getting oxygen into the wine.

If you want the wine to breath, a decanter with a wide base will work better, or say quicker, than leaving it in the bottle. Also: you don't need anything fancy, a simple, sturdy decanter will do. In the meanwhile, you could also use something like your Chemex, in case you have one, or similarly shaped objects.

In case you prefer to present the wine in its bottle, you could also pour the wine into a decanter, clean the bottle if there's sediments, and pour it back. The pouring itself will speed things up as opposed to just letting it breath in the bottle.
Has anyone tried the hyper decanting yet?


If I do buy a $30+ bottle it is usually 2000-2010 so I think that we are saying the same thing- decanting a younger wine in a flat based decanter helps to open it up.  The Pio Cesare I had Sunday night was a 2007 and cost $60 so I decanted it and it came out great. 

 

I have not had many older wines, so I am not at all able to address anything about them.  Still much to learn there.  The oldest bottle in my cellar is a 1997 Mastroberardino Historia.  Massimo, the head wine maker suggested that a 1-2 hour decant would be fine.  But again my knowledge of how to treat older wine is zero. 

 

I don't decant my cheaper bottles because I don't find a massive difference in decanting vs. letting it breath in-bottle/glass.  It's easier to cork it back up since we don't finish the whole bottle on weeknights. 

 

Again- I'm a casual (though frequent) wine drinker, not at all educated, so I just go by what my tastes tell me.  I think in my grandfathers generation that was called a wine-o?

post #15446 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapa View Post

A belated Valentines day meal for my wife and a few friends. Selosse Brut with caviar creme fraiche and blinis, and chaource and baguette, Ramey Sonoma Coast Chard with lobster pot pie, 88 Montebello with cheeses, and 68 Jimsomare Zin as a novelty.

ETA: the Selosse is better than the Pol Roger WC, by a lot, at least at this point in time. It' has an incredibly fine bead, like none I've experienced before.


I don't think this pic got the love it deserves. Nice line up.
post #15447 of 18178
I think you are over thinking the whole decanting thing. Decant to taste is the only statement you need across the board. teacha.gif
post #15448 of 18178
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think you are over thinking the whole decanting thing. Decant to taste is the only statement you need across the board. teacha.gif

Yeah, not sure why a price is the decision point for decanting. Also, young wines can indeed have sediment. Unfiltered and unfined wines of only 3-5 years bottle age can toss off significant sediment.
post #15449 of 18178
the fill level on that '68 has me a little uhoh.gif
post #15450 of 18178
I had a 2009 bord last night with a ton of sediment. Though I decant more to open up the flavors in the wine and less about sediment. Sediment is a easy thing to avoid getting in a glass if you just pay attention.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread