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The Official Wine Thread - Page 1017

post #15241 of 18228
Do some producers let the grapes ferment to the point of a low alcohol level and then remove the excess sugar? Is this possible? I tend to like wines that aren't very hot, but are still dry. Perhaps the sugar is just low and I perceive them as dry. I am sure it is different with each varietal as well.
post #15242 of 18228
i don't know if there's a method to do this, but it may be a way of correcting a mistake. Else I'd just assume a producer would pick the grapes before they're too ripe, unless it's a style they're going for.
post #15243 of 18228
That's a good question and I'm not sure. I'm thinking they cannot but I could well be wrong.
post #15244 of 18228
In Napa, the excuse given is always "Well, with global warming it's always so hot and the grapes get super ripe, and what can we do?" Left unsaid is the fact that the reviewers who make or break Napa (*cough* RP *cough*) favor "big" and one essential component of "big" is high alc.

They are not all terrible, I have to say, but most of them are not my thing.
post #15245 of 18228
I think "big" isn't always an alcohol threshold though. I have had some hot wines that tasted like a spirit and also had hot wines that I wouldn't have been able to tell they had so much alcohol. I guess it goes back to these words like "integration" and "balanced" which I am not so sure I even understand what people mean when they say it, but I do know that there is some aspect to the wine making process that smooths the spikes so to speak.
post #15246 of 18228
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think "big" isn't always an alcohol threshold though.

not always, but I'd argue a majority of the time. Not usually a lot of subtleties when a cabernet is pushing 16%.
post #15247 of 18228
To get "big" you need a lot of fruit and ripeness. With that has to come ETOH as all that sugar will be there.
post #15248 of 18228
for me, I may change my mind in 10 minutes:

Balance: the individual components of a wine (be it the acidity, the oak, flavor compounds, tannins, residual sugar levels, etc, etc.) are all "in line" to make a great wine and you don't have on individual component or components that are really stark. The one element that probably gets a pass here is tannins since they're expected in a lot of young wines. I'd argue that sometimes the idea of balance is a personal thing as there's a lot of wines out there that people really enjoy but I find them out of balance and not enjoyable.

Integration: the individual components of a wine work harmoniously with each other. You can have really good balance between acidity and flavor compounds, but that doesn't mean they're enjoyable together. Sometimes it just doesn't work out and it makes the wine feel disjointed.
post #15249 of 18228
Speaking of warming and impact, interesting the rate at which French champagne producers are buying up southern England right now.
post #15250 of 18228
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapa View Post

The ZH wines are generally freaks, at least to me. They achieve a level of sweetness that defies the levels of residual sugar. They're technically dry, but don't really taste it, yet they manage to be balanced and not cloying. I like them, but don't get to drink them as often as I'd like.

The single vineyard and grand crus are definitely not everyday drinkers and I think they need to be drunk with food. On their own they can be somewhat cloying and viscous even with the sweetness held in check. This past weekend I opened an '05 Brand Riesling to serve apres-ski with coq au riesling - it was magical.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Interesting... my limited experience with La Crau, Beaucastel have all been in the 13.5-14.5 range as far as I can recall.

All bumping 14.5 to 15 now, I believe.
post #15251 of 18228
Thread Starter 
Saturday night dinner party wine.

The Burrowing Owl is an Okanagan Pinot. Very interesting and quite unique, at least in my Pinot experience. Not as good as the superb Burrowing Owl Meritage (by far, the best Canadian wine I've tasted), but better than its Cabernet. Lots of smoke and liquorice in this Pinot. More old world than new?

The Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red is simply one of the finest wines I've tasted. The silkiness was almost too much. Every one at the table said it would make their top ten list of great wines. Agreed.

post #15252 of 18228
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Speaking of warming and impact, interesting the rate at which French champagne producers are buying up southern England right now.

smile.gif

The Garden of England, yes, but so frigging wet. Even with climate change. But, very interesting.
post #15253 of 18228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I would go for Antinori.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

+1

Almost forgot. Thanks for the recommendation. This was great actually. It reminded me of some Napa Cabs I have had. Here's a shot of a messy tablecloth created by two slobs:

AF47A683-57F4-4625-BEBE-DDF0DB57D84A-22768-00000F930D322932.jpg
post #15254 of 18228
That glassware... uhoh.gif Glad the wine was good though!
post #15255 of 18228
Ah, yes, it's good. I was seriously happy when I saw it in Maastricht for 9.75€ on offer. In Germany it ranges from 13€ (online) to 15-17€ (offline). If you haven't tried the Villa Antinori bianco yet, do so. It's great too. Santa Cristina is also quite solid and costs less. Their rosato, rosso (both Toscana) and bianco (Umbria) are all good. Haven't had their Chianti yet. And yeah, it's Antinori too.
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