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The Official Wine Thread - Page 2

post #16 of 18177
Correction - "Pikkara"
post #17 of 18177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Not sure why the "wtf."

I made a mistake on the wine, thought it was a Grange (bigger wine), and thought I'd toss a plea out. I see it was the lesser wine now, which will be approachable sooner. I just need to learn to keep my mouth shut in offering opinions on wines and booze.

I see you've edited your response, and added some further comments.

At the time, I just thought it was weird that you would tell someone not to drink the bottle yet, and when they asked for more info, you responded with nothing.
post #18 of 18177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
I see you've edited your response, and added some further comments.

At the time, I just thought it was weird that you would tell someone not to drink the bottle yet, and when they asked for more info, you responded with nothing.

I just need to keep my mouth shut. All of us have different taste profiles, when we like to drink our wines, different expectations, etc.
post #19 of 18177
Thread Starter 
No problem, Pio. As I said, I respect your opinion. We're heading down to a nice boutique hotel and then Canoe for dinner. We'll drink the RWT before the dinner and I'll report back here in a couple of days!! Wish I had a Grange And please, no one needs to keep their opinions to themselves. The more ideas/views, the better, as far as this newb is concerned. Cheers, a
post #20 of 18177
A neighbor dropped by last night with this in her hand. Didn't get a chance to photograph the bottle so I took this pic from my journal.
It's the 2002 Gran Caus from Can Rafols dels Caus from the DO Penedes of Spain! It's a smokey, toasty tobacco and dark fruity blend of 50% Cab Franc, 25% Cab Sav and 25% Merlot. Each was French Oak aged seperately for 10 months before blending. A first taste I was really taken aback by this pour and I'll have to track a bottle down for myself so that I can decant it to really see what she's got!

post #21 of 18177
Thread Starter 
Who do we have to bribe to get this thread stuck around here? LOL

There's going to be some great recs.
post #22 of 18177
I'm a big fan of the California Zins and Italian Primitivos.

For ~$10 a bottle Marietta Old Vine Red (a mainly Zin blend) is awesome. For Primitivos, I've only tried a few...Layer Cake is good, so is Amano, and I just picked up Mommy's Day Off and I'll try that on vacation next week.
post #23 of 18177
Thread Starter 
I love Zinfandel. An unappreciated grape, IMO. Had a Four Vines cheapie in a Vietnamese restaurant of all places. Ironstone makes a good cheapie, too. Artezin from Mendocino County is good. My current fav is from Sonoma. Gundlach Bundschu 2006. Fabulous! 91/100
post #24 of 18177
I asked the vintage on the RTW out of the expectation that it would be young; most good reds are sold young. I would give it some time also, but this is an occasion, and sometimes that overrules. Decant though.
post #25 of 18177
Thread Starter 
This was opened upon arrival at the Le Germain Hotel in Toronto in celebration of our 25th Anniversary. We did not have to time to decant, so drank most when we returned after a fabulous dinner at Canoe (see post below). This may have not been a good idea, as by that time, we had Perrier Jouet, martinis and the bottle highlighted in the next post! That said, Piobaire was indeed correct. The RWT does have epic potential. The fruit is absolutely first class and the wine tastes wonderful, but I could not help thinking as I was drinking that some of the 'soul', the depth, was missing in favour of the alcohol. No razor blades, no bitterness, it was smooth, excellent wine. But some serious aging will turn this from excellent to stunning, I think. 91/100
post #26 of 18177
Thread Starter 


Full disclosure. I adore Napa Cabs. That said, YMMV.

This bottle (decanting on the 51st floor -- Canoe Restaurant) was fabulous. Jammy goodness, stewed fruit, the lot, even after a short, 30 minute decant. We savoured every drop. Had the balance and complexity that I like with top quality fruit. I want a case, plz! 93/100
post #27 of 18177
Both of those look just fabulous! I mean who can pass up jammy goodness

I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one who resorts to his vinturi in times of need
post #28 of 18177
if still possible, I'd take "red" out of the title. I've been going on a Italian white extravaganza lately and these must be mentioned. Also, grower champagne, single-vineyard white burgundy, the best German Riesling, Sauternes - epic whites that anybody interested in wine would be doing themselves a disservice by missing.



On topic, this weekend I had a 2000 Grand-Puy-Lacoste, my second 2000 GPL in the past 2 months. It has that unmistakable aged Bordeaux hint coming in nicely, and is quite approachable now. Can't wait to try it in another 5, 15, 25 years.

And the store near my has a handful of bottles of 2000 Leroy AOC Burgundy (full grower, mind you) and I may jump on a bottle or two.
post #29 of 18177
Thread Starter 
1. 2004 + 2. Drinkable now 3. > $40.00 4. 'Clear' style rather than funky 5. Great fruit, delicate, balanced, complex. Does this exist? We had this nice Burgundy at the SF SFO meetup. Was good, but the 2005 Merry Edwards Pinot we had first was IMO much better.
post #30 of 18177
Quote:
Originally Posted by audiophilia View Post
1. 2004 +
2. Drinkable now
3. > $40.00
4. 'Clear' style rather than funky
5. Great fruit, delicate, balanced, complex.

Does this exist?


for Burgundy, this can be sort of tricky. The prices can inch very high for great wines, it is unfortunate. You could always checking out something like a Latour Chambole-Musigny, or I suggest looking for some wines from the village of Santennay. Ask the 'experts' at your store for some producer suggestions for Santennay, names are drawing a blank for me right now.

I might get this wrong (and I don't feel like googling anything right now), but Santennay is a village just south of the Cote de Bone (sp?) in Burgundy. They make some really solid wines that are much friendlier in price than its northern neighbor or the Cote de Nuits. The best from Santennay will never be confused with something like a Clos Veugot, but they make excellent value plays in the sub-$50 red Burgundy category.
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