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The Official Wine Thread - Page 973

post #14581 of 17896
most here are all about value play, especially me, and I think my posts support this.









But I disagree completely about Burgundy being short lived. If anything, its surprisingly the opposite and I find this is more and more to be the case.
post #14582 of 17896
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

most here are all about value play, especially me, and I think my posts support this.
But I disagree completely about Burgundy being short lived. If anything, its surprisingly the opposite and I find this is more and more to be the case.

I dont check this thread often enough to have a reference point. I defer to your perception of yourself.

Burgundy peaks much earlier than the vast majority of wines. Its very delicate and thrives on its 'middle age'. At the place I worked, we had a Monday bring your own wine (no cork fee) night. I was amazed at the 30+ yr old Burgs that came in. Most 'old' were well past it, but the owners confused the lack of tannin and soon after corking buzz as refinement. To some extent it was true, it was grand at open, but in 20 mins it (after their laughable demand to worsen the situation by decanting) was flat as a mexican tortilla and nobody could admit otherwise except me, an independent taster (though I never said shit), they were invested in the idea this 35 yr old pinot was worth anything more than a splash among 10 glasses and move on.

If you like to age wine and explore that route, there are many of them that stand it, but pinot generally aint one. Although, white burgundy is different.
post #14583 of 17896
Oh Christ.
post #14584 of 17896
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Oh Christ.

+1
post #14585 of 17896
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Oh Christ.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

+1

Hope you are not replying to me.

Never tasted a burg worth the money live past 30 years with perfect storage. If you have a different experience, do tell.

Some burg has a lot of tannin and develops and is structured to survive past 30 years to justify an $800 a bottle value, but its rare. The only example I have every sampled that ticked all the boxes was a Richebourg Echezeaux and truly warranted its $1200 value.

Most Burg peaks within 20 years, from what I have tried.
post #14586 of 17896
Richebourg Echezeauxs are awesome. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #14587 of 17896
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Richebourg Echezeauxs are awesome. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Not sure if serious.

Wine a fluid substance with a bell curve on it (no pun on fluid). I've been out of waiting tables and being a sommelier for 20 years when I finished school. Bah to the wine game. Totally stupid. So many snoot-monkeys and name dropping. I always found that drinking what you like was more valuable than a '61 Haut you couldn't put in context. LOL at people at a table talking about peach and raspberry when all I tasted was pure alcohol and shit.

Personally, over the last few years, I have decided to stock a cellar. So I tasted and bought out of the way stuff that would be fun. Worked thru the case or 2 over time and made it exclusive at a dinner where the last 5 bottles were drunk at its peak, or what I felt like was. Its more fun than name drop and braggart wine. Those usually rest laurels on a few great vintages and fanfare. Again, wine is fluid. There are so many vintages down the street totally ignored that blow famous wine away.

I actually stopped blind tasting dinners with a famous vinter because too many guests picked the 'supposed' swill.

I think it was Freakonomics where they put a shit wine amidst a group of snoot professors and were derided for it. People hate to have their taste questioned but it misses the point. Your taste is yours and you should enjoy it as such instead of name drop swirl the glass raspberry and now I taste leather... bullshit, you taste the pricetag.

When I blind dinner partied unknown names, it sparked wonderful honest discussion about quality. Introduce a brand name and you might as well pour it down the sink. Mens Clothing SF has the same issue.
Edited by idfnl - 12/4/12 at 10:45pm
post #14588 of 17896
lurker[1].gif
post #14589 of 17896
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Richebourg Echezeauxs are awesome. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

their laughable demand to worsen the situation by decanting
old wines usually have sediment that must be removed. This is why a decanter is used.
post #14590 of 17896
I used to be of the school that Burg was not meant to age but the last few years my opinion has evolved. I think also that the style of winemaking is more F-U these days, a lot of producers don't care if their wines show little in the early years. It's the opposite trend to what has happened in much of Bordeaux.
post #14591 of 17896
Picked up some 2010 Folonari Chianti and plan to try a bottle either tomorrow or Friday. $7 and was #41 on the Top 100 for WS this year. Figure it's worth a go.
post #14592 of 17896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I used to be of the school that Burg was not meant to age but the last few years my opinion has evolved.

I'd be interested in trying some 15-20 year old basic Bourgogne Rouge or Cote de Nuits from a really solid producer (maybe soemthing like Bachelet, Fourrier, Liger-Belair, Roumier, JF Mugnier, Chevillon, or d'Angerville). I bet there'd be plenty of life left.
post #14593 of 17896
Probably hard to find. I doubt many people save those. They are bought to drink young.
post #14594 of 17896
I have been drinking the 2010 Bords and they seem tannic as hell. Good though.
post #14595 of 17896
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
old wines usually have sediment that must be removed. This is why a decanter is used.

There are ways to control that without a decanter. I used to decant everything but not much anymore, I actually like the different phases from the bottle. Decanting is useful when the wine is tight but if its not its a bit of a shock and sorta bypasses many of its phases.
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