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The Official Wine Thread - Page 968

post #14506 of 18231
What you did there? I see it.
post #14507 of 18231
91
post #14508 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by pscolari View Post

If you're ever in NY I will open up some Bedrock for you. That will change your mind. Old vines baby.
Have had... was not moved.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Harsh, brah. I'm not beyond enjoying a well priced Zin. Heck, I'm not beyond enjoying one of the SVDs from Turley that's probably over priced, i.e. Ubberoth Vineyard

Yeah - but you also like Bitters wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

As a greasy wop from Northern California, I should like Zin, but I don't.

I knew I liked you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Some of the Ridge Zinfandels with 10+ years on them are nice. I had a '02(?) Geyserville a while back that was quite good.

I'll admit that Ridge is a bit of an exception but I can still take/leave. I'll give credit to the Catholics and Zin for saving California wine making during prohibition but that's about it... revolve.gif
Edited by Cary Grant - 11/29/12 at 5:00am
post #14509 of 18231
I've only had a few Zins. I thought they were rather bland, one dimensional. Limited experience though. A guy in my office is obsessed with them. He had a bunch of his French wife's cousins over for the holidays from Paris and he wanted to impress them because they are winos. He bought a bunch of CA Zins and they didn't utter a word about the wine. I giggled.
post #14510 of 18231
I'm very meh on Zin and its cousin from Italy (primitivo)
post #14511 of 18231
I think Zin has its place and really do not mind one of the better ones. The bulk Zins, which there are a crap ton of, tends to have as much RS as the "dry" label will allow. This is not to be wondered at in wines made for mass markets and is not common to just Zin. I think most bulk wines from the Left Coast have as much RS left as is legal for a "dry" designation. In fact, I remember reading some successful maker of both premium and bulk Chard saying exactly this somewhere recently.
post #14512 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

I'm very meh on Zin and its cousin from Italy (primitivo)

I get that- though I don't recall a primitivo that is as overworked as I find LC zins.
post #14513 of 18231
If one if going to drink Zin, one should drink Ridge.
post #14514 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

New Cellar Tracker. Hate it.

Meh, I actually like it. Certainly room for improvement, but better than the old CT.

+1 to all the Zin hate, especially Left Coast. So much of it is just bland, no finesse. I'm sure someone could find a bottle of it that I like, but on the whole, not a grape I much like.
post #14515 of 18231
Not a Zin fan either. Its just too much work and blows away the food more often than not. I dont generally eat heavy sauces and slugs of meat so its not a wine I turn to. In addtion, it just doesnt taste very good to my palette.
post #14516 of 18231
Surprised at the zin hate here. I think the grape itself is one with a lot of potential and is generally more interesting than a lof of varietals, as long as the winemaking doesn't get in the way. But that holds true for most, at least for me. I think it's a varietal that was bastardized in the mid-late late nineties and rode the wave of over ripeness, overextraction, high alcohol, etc that got high scores and made a favorable impression on the score chasing crowd. I like zin, particularly from old school producers that make it in a balanced style, like Ridge, Scherrer, Dashe, et al. When made from ripe and not over ripe grapes, I find it to be a good food wine and generally enjoyable. When well made, it can also evolve into something interesting. Recently I've had a 97 Geyserville and a 2001 Geyserville (out of a 3L) that were really enjoyable to drink.
post #14517 of 18231
Ridge zin is on another plane than all the others.

part of my problem with zin is that most of my experience with it is from 15-20 years ago when it was very "in" but not good. Also, my dad loves it so they always have it around in Santa Cruz and whenever I drink it when I am there, whatever he buys, I just don't like it.
post #14518 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Ridge zin is on another plane than all the others.
part of my problem with zin is that most of my experience with it is from 15-20 years ago when it was very "in" but not good. Also, my dad loves it so they always have it around in Santa Cruz and whenever I drink it when I am there, whatever he buys, I just don't like it.
I think Zin has actually gone through two periods like that, when it was made in a high alcohol style that was briefly popular, but ultimately ended up turning people off to the varietal. Once in the early/mid 70s, then again in the mid/late nineties. That's really too bad because it is clearly the greatest varietal planted in north america. Anyone disagreeing with that is going on the blocked list.
post #14519 of 18231
in my rebuttal, I have no idea what I would consider to be the greatest varietal planted in north america.
post #14520 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

in my rebuttal, I have no idea what I would consider to be the greatest varietal planted in north america.

Chablis.
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