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The Official Wine Thread - Page 915

post #13711 of 18036
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Does anyone have this (Spiegelau)? I'm about to buy a decanter and not sure what to get. This one seems to be useful with the stopper as I'll often drink wine on my own in the future and therefore won't finish a bottle every night. Alternatively, I could just pour half a bottle in a normal one (and save some money) and leave the rest in the bottle....
In general, do you prefer thick or thin glass (not that it really has an impact, but anyway)?

Here's what you should do in that case if you know you're only going to drink around half a bottle. Have an empty half bottle of wine on hand. As soon as you open your full bottle pour half into the half bottle and put the freshly pulled cork into the now full half bottle. Then put it in the refrigerator. I know of no other method as foolproof for keeping the wine as intact as possible.
post #13712 of 18036
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post



Does anyone have this (Spiegelau)? I'm about to buy a decanter and not sure what to get. This one seems to be useful with the stopper as I'll often drink wine on my own in the future and therefore won't finish a bottle every night. Alternatively, I could just pour half a bottle in a normal one (and save some money) and leave the rest in the bottle....
In general, do you prefer thick or thin glass (not that it really has an impact, but anyway)?

My best advice to you, if using a decanter is going to be a common event, is to buy at least one cheap one. I'm talking, cheapest Ikea one you can find, or the like. Why? If you use it often it is bound to get broken. If you get a cheap one, when it gets broken, you won't fret too much. If you want a fancy one for guests still get a cheap one for regular use.
post #13713 of 18036
^ I only own a cheapo decanter for that reason. Have been waiting to break it so I can have an excuse to buy a nicer one. Turns out that thick, inelegant glass is pretty durable--damn thing won't break.
post #13714 of 18036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

My best advice to you, if using a decanter is going to be a common event, is to buy at least one cheap one. I'm talking, cheapest Ikea one you can find, or the like. Why? If you use it often it is bound to get broken. If you get a cheap one, when it gets broken, you won't fret too much. If you want a fancy one for guests still get a cheap one for regular use.
I have my eye on one that's very cheap (8€, 1.5l) and doesn't spill. Thin glass though.. I've heard from some people that thick glass often spills, but maybe they're just doing it wrong. tongue.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewfoot View Post

Here's what you should do in that case if you know you're only going to drink around half a bottle. Have an empty half bottle of wine on hand. As soon as you open your full bottle pour half into the half bottle and put the freshly pulled cork into the now full half bottle. Then put it in the refrigerator. I know of no other method as foolproof for keeping the wine as intact as possible.
Really? Red wine in the fridge, too? I'm talking about finishing the wine in two days instead of one, not 3-5 days or so, if that changes anything. (Edit: Forget the former part of the question as white/rosé gets in the fridge anyway so it's obvious that you specifically mean red wine..)
post #13715 of 18036
Every decanter will dribble a little drop on every glass you pour. Notice even sommeliers have a wipe napkin with them when they pour from decanters.
post #13716 of 18036
I got one in a specialty kitchen place for $35. It is really thick and a cool shape. I have a lot of chips in it for sure, but not broken, yet.

As for saving wine, I notice that some wines no matter what you do to them suck after 24 hours. Some just don't hold well. Good ones get better.
post #13717 of 18036
Ok, I'll keep looking for a thicker one (the 8€ decater is very thin).

@pB: I have noticed that as well. Even a few times after a couple hours in the glass. But maybe I'm just crazy.
post #13718 of 18036

Slew is right on.  Really only works with young wines.  Drink up, on the older ones!

post #13719 of 18036
OK, I just returned from Bonny Doon. This is my favorite SCM winery from the Bay/Hippie side of the hill, that is, not the side that Ridge and Mt. Eden are on.

BD specializes in Rhone blends. There is no Cab and no Chard. No Merlot and no Pinot. No SB even. A totally Rhone winery with some Spain and Italy mixed in. And, not Rhone like Paso or Sine Qua Non. The weather is not hot enough for that. These are far more subtle wines. But they can age, as I found today.

Much that one could say. My two faves have always been their rose and their low(er) end sticky. The rose is really for my money the best made in California. Not that I have tried that many but this one is great, reminiscent of the fine french rose for around $15. They make very little of it a year, they release it in May and it's always sold out by august. You can get it here but I've never seen it anywhere else.

The cheaper sticky called vinferno is a minor classic, like BV's muscat, a great little alternative to Sauternes. Really, it's better than the BV. Today I tried the expensive sticky ($30 for a 375) called Le Vol des Anges and it's fantastic. Reminds me of some of the great Rieslings from Wiener in the Finglerlakes but quite a bit cheaper.

Their key wines are red Rhones called Cigare Volant. I tried several going back to 2003, all VERY good. They average around $35-$45, Age well.

But the shocker for me was the 2005 Nebbiolo. I have never had a California Nebbiolo. I was not even aware anyone made one. This was great. Could steam the label off and sell it as a Barolo. Or, it's a bit light, maybe a Barbaresco. Color was even dead perfect. $40 and it needs some years.
post #13720 of 18036
Sounds interesting! Siduri makes a Nebbiolo, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

OK, I just returned from Bonny Doon. This is my favorite SCM winery from the Bay/Hippie side of the hill, that is, not the side that Ridge and Mt. Eden are on.
BD specializes in Rhone blends. There is no Cab and no Chard. No Merlot and no Pinot. No SB even. A totally Rhone winery with some Spain and Italy mixed in. And, not Rhone like Paso or Sine Qua Non. The weather is not hot enough for that. These are far more subtle wines. But they can age, as I found today.
Much that one could say. My two faves have always been their rose and their low(er) end sticky. The rose is really for my money the best made in California. Not that I have tried that many but this one is great, reminiscent of the fine french rose for around $15. They make very little of it a year, they release it in May and it's always sold out by august. You can get it here but I've never seen it anywhere else.
The cheaper sticky called vinferno is a minor classic, like BV's muscat, a great little alternative to Sauternes. Really, it's better than the BV. Today I tried the expensive sticky ($30 for a 375) called Le Vol des Anges and it's fantastic. Reminds me of some of the great Rieslings from Wiener in the Finglerlakes but quite a bit cheaper.
Their key wines are red Rhones called Cigare Volant. I tried several going back to 2003, all VERY good. They average around $35-$45, Age well.
But the shocker for me was the 2005 Nebbiolo. I have never had a California Nebbiolo. I was not even aware anyone made one. This was great. Could steam the label off and sell it as a Barolo. Or, it's a bit light, maybe a Barbaresco. Color was even dead perfect. $40 and it needs some years.
post #13721 of 18036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

But the shocker for me was the 2005 Nebbiolo. I have never had a California Nebbiolo. I was not even aware anyone made one. This was great. Could steam the label off and sell it as a Barolo. Or, it's a bit light, maybe a Barbaresco. Color was even dead perfect. $40 and it needs some years.

rolleyes.gif
post #13722 of 18036
ok, what?
post #13723 of 18036
Just sampled some Chateau Musar things after a 20-year absence. The only ones I'd been offered until now were wildly overpriced older years by Italian Wine Merchants. Now our local shop has some of the Bordeaux blend ($50), a Rhone-ish concoction named "Hochar" ($30), and a young vines version of that ("Jeaune"-- $20). Tried the latter two. The Hochar was really very good. From 2007 or so. The 2000 Musar proper might well be worth a try as well, although in absolute terms there will probably be some Bordeaux that is better priced for the quality.
post #13724 of 18036
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Had a glass of Viña Zaco 2008 yesterday. Great for the money. Very smooth. Good aftertaste. At least the wine was good since the food wasn't.

Great wine.

post #13725 of 18036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

ok, what?

I have it, the doubt.
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