or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Wine Thread - Page 914

post #13696 of 18227
Hmmm, saw the post about Ridge. Too bad they didn't open any older bottles. When I was there last they opened both a '91 and a '92. Both are great but the latter is truly a superstar.
post #13697 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

My new wife and I are taking a few days honeymoon and driving down the west coast and back in about a week. We'd really like to stop at as many wineries as we can, but I'm not familiar with the Washington or Oregon wine community. Can anyone suggest any out-of-the-park great wineries we should check out? Route isn't planned yet so I'm open to anything, really.

First, congratulations. Second, I don't know any wineries up there. Thrid, visiting wineries isn't for everybody, even for all wine lovers. I don't enjoy it very much, myself. My advice would be to try it out, but if you don't like the first few, don't force yourself to do more. Enjoy your honeymoon.
post #13698 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Congrats on getting married.
It's really hard to make these recommendations not knowing your tastes. Here is a great website full of maps: http://www.winesnw.com/index.html I've not done Oregon yet but I would do the Willamette Valley. It has a couple regions but is only about 100 miles long. I would probably start out in the Dundee Hills (I've heard there's some great B&B and boutique hotel lodging) and some of my favorite Oregon wineries, like Domaine Drouhin, Penner-Ash, The Eyrie, Domaine Serene, Argyle, Durant. You could wander up to Yamhill. If you do make sure to hit Ken Wright, Alexanna, Soter, and Elk Cove.
Enjoy.

All good suggestions. Would also suggest Owen Roe. Need to make an appointment but well worth it. More authentic, not your typical tasting room, commercial kind of feel. Great reds.
post #13699 of 18227
I went to about 3 wineries in northern Oregon and all were mediocre. The views were stunning though.
post #13700 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

My new wife and I are taking a few days honeymoon and driving down the west coast and back in about a week. We'd really like to stop at as many wineries as we can, but I'm not familiar with the Washington or Oregon wine community. Can anyone suggest any out-of-the-park great wineries we should check out? Route isn't planned yet so I'm open to anything, really.

First, congratulations. Second, I don't know any wineries up there. Thrid, visiting wineries isn't for everybody, even for all wine lovers. I don't enjoy it very much, myself. My advice would be to try it out, but if you don't like the first few, don't force yourself to do more. Enjoy your honeymoon.

I can certainly see where a tasting room is not for everyone. I'd also say tasting room experiences vary quite a bit. I have to be in the mood for it. It's one thing if you're walking around a town and decided to pop in vs. planning a drive too. With the drive to ones I think picking a few prime wineries, and having a nice picnic lunch somewhere pretty with a good bottle just purchased, is better than slamming through as many tasting rooms as possible.

Another oddity: I've had some of my best tasting room experiences at places with mediocre wine. Oppolo in Paso is a great example. So/so wine but a great tasting room experience, with wood fired outdoor pizza oven and grill, free homemade pizza, grilled homemade sausage the owner makes, some nice cheeses, and a friendly staff. I'll take that over snooty or inattentive staff at a great winery any day.
post #13701 of 18227
311988_855348248224_1387492048_n.jpg
post #13702 of 18227
last night I had a silver oak '95 and a Cos '94. The silver oak was better though the cos was not bad, even though '94 was a weak year.
post #13703 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

last night I had a silver oak '95 and a Cos '94. The silver oak was better though the cos was not bad, even though '94 was a weak year.

Here's part of a funny recent article written by Neal Martin for the Wine Advocate's website about 1994 Bordeaux:

Boring? Bordeaux 1994

There is only one thing worse than being born under a bad sign, and that is being born under a boring one.

You remember those fellow classmates, their uniform always perfectly pressed, haircut by mum and avid member of the chess club (but secretly they found draughts a more visceral gladiatorial contest.) Their aspiration in life is to become an accountant, not a financial officer, but preferably a menial position where you can remain unnoticed close to the filing cabinet. They are wary of the opposite sex and miraculously end up marrying somebody even more boring than themselves. The inseparable couple wears matching cardigans, share the same disinterests and make love every other leap day, preferably with the lights off and before “Newsnight”. They live in a semi-detached on a middle-class estate where a discarded shopping trolley is regarded as a serious crime scene and a privet hedge to gossip over is mandatory. They tut at the Daily Mail each morning, listen to Gilbert & Sullivan or, if feeling edgy, the latest schmaltz from Michael Bublé. They mow the lawn every other Sunday morning whether it needs it or not, they have worn jeans only once and are still feel traumatized by the experience. They retire early as they saved for a pension rather than grabbed life by its balls; spend their autumnal years on the golf course and in the second-hand caravan parked outside Eastbourne. Their final four words before their final breath is: “If only I had…”

Their life is a non-event: birth and death bookending nothing of consequence.

This brings me to the Bordeaux 1994 vintage: a growing season neither good nor bad, just a bit…boring. Better than the previous three years but not in the same class as the next two.

However, back in the day when I was procuring wine for the thirsty in Japan, the 1994 was a go-to, no-brainer vintage. Trust me, I vacuumed up those 1994 Clarets like there was no tomorrow.
Why?
Because they were not that good, but nor were they that bad. In fact, in the late 1990s these wines were sought after since the quality was enough to give pleasure, but not enough for châteaux to ratchet up prices beyond what we would now consider “bargain basement”. The 1994 vintages appealed to the on-trade, large-scale distributors who wanted decent Claret with a recognizable name and boy, did they lap it up and gulp it down. Around that time, I consumed a great deal myself and harbor memories of what you might describe as workmanlike Bordeaux that sought to satisfy rather than amaze.

Now in 2012, I wondered how those 1994s were faring? So when a dinner was organized to re-appraise the vintage, I booked myself a pew at the table. Would their appeal have faded with the passing years? Or would they have remained those steadfast, conservative wines, the best of whom transcended that so-called “boring” growing season?

If truth is told, I was rather nonplussed by this selection of 1994 Clarets. Yes, there was a workmanlike charm to them, but mostly I did find them a bit…boring.
post #13704 of 18227
I also bought a good deal of '94s because the price was very low. A somm at Veritas recently talked me out of a '94 something or other that they had for a very good price saying that '94 was a terrible vintage. I was like, no, not terrible, just OK but fine for what it is. still I let him talk me into an '89 bandol that sucked.

Speaking of Bandol, this 2002 that they have at Soif is fantastic and I think I will put some down.
post #13705 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I also bought a good deal of '94s because the price was very low. A somm at Veritas recently talked me out of a '94 something or other that they had for a very good price saying that '94 was a terrible vintage. I was like, no, not terrible, just OK but fine for what it is. still I let him talk me into an '89 bandol that sucked.
Speaking of Bandol, this 2002 that they have at Soif is fantastic and I think I will put some down.

The moral of the story is, always trust your instincts and get what you want. How was the food at Veritas?
post #13706 of 18227
lame
post #13707 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

lame

In line with what I remember under the new regime. Still a great wine list. I just can't believe they did away with the big stainless bar they used to have. The best part of Veritas was sitting there post-dinner and getting another bottle off the list.
post #13708 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I also bought a good deal of '94s because the price was very low. A somm at Veritas recently talked me out of a '94 something or other that they had for a very good price saying that '94 was a terrible vintage. I was like, no, not terrible, just OK but fine for what it is. still I let him talk me into an '89 bandol that sucked.
Speaking of Bandol, this 2002 that they have at Soif is fantastic and I think I will put some down.

I had a 2001 Bandol red last summer that was still a tannic monster. It tasted like a 2 year old wine. It was pretty awesome still though.
post #13709 of 18227


Does anyone have this (Spiegelau)? I'm about to buy a decanter and not sure what to get. This one seems to be useful with the stopper as I'll often drink wine on my own in the future and therefore won't finish a bottle every night. Alternatively, I could just pour half a bottle in a normal one (and save some money) and leave the rest in the bottle....
In general, do you prefer thick or thin glass (not that it really has an impact, but anyway)?
post #13710 of 18227
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Does anyone have this (Spiegelau)? I'm about to buy a decanter and not sure what to get. This one seems to be useful with the stopper as I'll often drink wine on my own in the future and therefore won't finish a bottle every night. Alternatively, I could just pour half a bottle in a normal one (and save some money) and leave the rest in the bottle....
In general, do you prefer thick or thin glass (not that it really has an impact, but anyway)?

U crayzie
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Wine Thread