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The Official Wine Thread - Page 903

post #13531 of 18231
Because it is fairly priced vs. the retail marketplace, and I expect it to outperform the '99 and '00.
post #13532 of 18231
I had a 2010 Abtei Weiss, Muri-Gries from Alto Adige tonight. Very good, but years too young. A nice belnd of 70/30 Pinot Bianco/Pinot Grigio, aged for 16 Months in 500l barrels. Good minerality, although lacking a bit of acid.
post #13533 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sterling Gillette View Post

I had a 2010 Abtei Weiss, Muri-Gries from Alto Adige tonight. Very good, but years too young. A nice belnd of 70/30 Pinot Bianco/Pinot Grigio, aged for 16 Months in 500l barrels. Good minerality, although lacking a bit of acid.

Some great stuff. Have seen your blog and I love it man. Great food, wine and of course clothing. You are based in Italy?

post #13534 of 18231
Any experience with La Pergole Torte?
post #13535 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapa View Post

I don't know that a jammy barolo exists. Nebbiolo isn't prone to jamminess, at least not in my experience. Slewfoot is the expert here and hopefully he'll chime in.
Thanks. I eventually opened it three hours before dinner. The nose is a little restrained. The taste is much more powerful. Still a lot of tannins going on, so I guess it would benefit from more cellaring (or maybe Nebbiolo generally is more on the tanninic side?). I'm sipping on the rest of the bottle right now, 8 hours after opening, and it balanced out quite nicely (but still heavy on the tannins). It actually has some sort of jamminess to it, imo, but it worked just fine with dinner. I'd like to get into detail about the taste but unfortunately I can't translate it into words -- yet. The only thing I noticed it that the nose has some sort of kirschwasser smell (that's not meant in a negativ way), more exactly griottes/maraska cherries in kirschwasser. I taste it now, too, so I guess cherry plays quite a role in this wine. Cassis/blueberry/raspberry or so, too.
Aftertaste is mediocre though. Not that long.
post #13536 of 18231
Nebbiolo based wines generally are tannic and can be unpleasant if not outright undrinkable young. They can also be extremely long lived wines. I find them to be floral on the nose, roses and sometimes violets, and often have undertones of tar on the palate. Mature Barolo and Barbaresco are a joy to drink.
post #13537 of 18231
I see, floral/rose/violet may be a description for it. But the nose was really "introverted". I don't know what tar tastes like though. When you drink something, will those associations just pop in your mind or do you think of the smell/taste of roses/berries/plums/cherries... and then check whether you can make it out in the flavor profile? With which technique did you begin (maybe the latter and it evolved to the former?)?
post #13538 of 18231
I admit I'm actually not one who will taste a wine and come up with a fruit basket of descriptors. I honestly don't know how people pick five or six flavors/aromas out of a wine. Those I've listed for Nebbiolo are the most prominent to me and I think they're commonly associated with that grape. The tar flavor I get is generally on the finish and is a lingering flavor after the wine is gone. I'd characterize my limited ability to identify it is similar to how you might smell cut grass and associate that with a flavor or taste even though you've probably never actually eaten grass. The connection between taste and smell is really what I think most wine tasting descriptors is about.

As far as the nose being introverted, that's not surprising with a young Barolo. Young Nebbiolo based wines are often tight, tannic, with high acids and they can take decades to unwind. Good mature Barolo is very aromatic, in fact I'd say it's one of the wine's more prominent features and it only becomes more extroverted with age. When I was first interested in wine I didn't get Italian wines at all. I was used to big California fruit bombs and couldn't handle the subtle flavors of Italian wines and the high acid levels. I probably drink about 60% Italian wines and it's the first section I look at when I'm in a wine store. I'm still learning myself, but it's the kind of learning I actually enjoy.
post #13539 of 18231
Aren't the newer style Baroli more fruit fwd?

I don't have many of them in the cellar, some Domenico Clerico ciabot mentin ginestra and fratelli Barolo brevia
Edited by drizzt3117 - 7/31/12 at 6:36pm
post #13540 of 18231
Quote:
Originally Posted by drizzt3117 View Post

Aren't the newer style Baroli more fruit fwd?
I don't have many of them in the cellar, some mentin ginestra.
Maybe. I've had a few and don't care for them any more than I care for blowsy CA wines. I think the winemaking style can obliterate the typicity of the grape and the region, and they end up tasting like big generic red wines. I'm not sure of the names of the "modern" Barolo I've had as I didn't pay attention to the names given that I didn't like them, but I want to say La Spinetta was one.
post #13541 of 18231
La Spinetta is certainly more "modern". I pray that the best vineyards resist chasing sales and err towards big, fruity, oaky...
post #13542 of 18231
Here's a pretty good article about the different styles.

http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/is-barolo-still-italys-greatest-wine
post #13543 of 18231
If you like Pride, you'll probably like the fruit forward Barolo. I don't really care for either.
post #13544 of 18231

Pergole Torte is great.  Wonderful Sangiovese.  Getting pricey these days.  There are two schools in Nebbiolo, the old school, Conterno and the like are tannic monsters when young and almost undrinkable in youth.  They become wonderful wines, still powerful and alcoholic, but much more nuanced with age as discussed.  The "new school" wines like Sandrone, etc favor shorter hotter macerations and are much more approachable young.  Worth spending some time reading up on these and tasting.  No substitute for lots of tasting!

post #13545 of 18231
I'm seeing some of it around $85; is that a decent price? How would it compare to Isole e Olena?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgein View Post

Pergole Torte is great.  Wonderful Sangiovese.  Getting pricey these days.  There are two schools in Nebbiolo, the old school, Conterno and the like are tannic monsters when young and almost undrinkable in youth.  They become wonderful wines, still powerful and alcoholic, but much more nuanced with age as discussed.  The "new school" wines like Sandrone, etc favor shorter hotter macerations and are much more approachable young.  Worth spending some time reading up on these and tasting.  No substitute for lots of tasting!
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