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The Official Wine Thread - Page 880

post #13186 of 17918
It needs to be boiled first, cause you can't just fry blood (really steeped to coagulate, boiled will pop.) Actually, you can, and there is a famous Burgundian dish of fried chicken blood. Something like sanguinette or similar.

In my experience, which is minimal, boudin is noir and boudin blanc is blanc. I imagine it is regional, though, with the most common in the area being called boudin simply.
post #13187 of 17918
I wonder if what I grew up with in Canada was boiled or something in manufacturing now. There's a black blood pudding I used to love, comes in an 18" or so link like a kielbasa. We would slice it and fry it up. Would get all crispy and was very good.
post #13188 of 17918
Yeah, those are boiled, or steamed at a dedicated temp these days, then you slice and fry them. When you stuff blood sausage, you don't use a stuffer, you use a large mouth funnel because the mixture is so wet. Blood coagulates and thickens the sausage in the first cooking. I don't think I've ever seen a truly raw blood sausage for sale. They basically go straight from the funnel into the water.

I like them with apples and mustard, sliced and sauteed, as you do.
post #13189 of 17918
Apples and mustard? Will have to try that. Part of a farmer's breakfast for us, which growing up included burnt toast and bad coffee. laugh.gif

I can't find the stuff these days.
post #13190 of 17918
I bet you Pio could create a pretty cool thread on sausage and charcuterie
post #13191 of 17918
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

I bet you Pio could create a pretty cool thread on sausage and charcuterie

Okay, okay...so what wine would you put with the black blood pudding I was talking about? Pair it with Matt's presentation.

Champs?
post #13192 of 17918
red Burg
post #13193 of 17918
Had an eye-tie the other day, Gome. 2005 Demarie Roero. Nice. Pretty bold.
post #13194 of 17918
Speaking of pairings, what do you guys usually do with spicy (not asian) food? I'm having friends over for dinner tonight and I'm making Turkish food (Adana kebabs, kisir, and "fixins"). The only white I've got on hand at the moment is Picpoul, and none of my red choices are sounding promising.

Edit: Actually I do have a rather nice Chardonnay and a Piesporter Michelburg Spätlese but those aren't striking my fancy either. With middle eastern food, I feel like you want something that feels a touch exotic, or at least Mediterranean. Maybe Provencal rose is the best answer.
Edited by Quatsch - 6/14/12 at 7:56am
post #13195 of 17918
I reach for a Riesling in that situation.

Edit: ooops, "not Asian." Got me and am interested to read what others think.
post #13196 of 17918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Okay, okay...so what wine would you put with the black blood pudding I was talking about? Pair it with Matt's presentation.
Champs?
Calvados.
post #13197 of 17918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Speaking of pairings, what do you guys usually do with spicy (not asian) food? I'm having friends over for dinner tonight and I'm making Turkish food (Adana kebabs, kisir, and "fixins"). The only white I've got on hand at the moment is Picpoul, and none of my red choices are sounding promising.
Edit: Actually I do have a rather nice Chardonnay and a Piesporter Michelburg Spätlese but those aren't striking my fancy either. With middle eastern food, I feel like you want something that feels a touch exotic, or at least Mediterranean. Maybe Provencal rose is the best answer.

Dry Tokaj.
post #13198 of 17918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Speaking of pairings, what do you guys usually do with spicy (not asian) food? I'm having friends over for dinner tonight and I'm making Turkish food (Adana kebabs, kisir, and "fixins"). The only white I've got on hand at the moment is Picpoul, and none of my red choices are sounding promising.

Edit: Actually I do have a rather nice Chardonnay and a Piesporter Michelburg Spätlese but those aren't striking my fancy either. With middle eastern food, I feel like you want something that feels a touch exotic, or at least Mediterranean. Maybe Provencal rose is the best answer.
Personally, I would go with a rose but for those looking for more body, try Syrah
post #13199 of 17918
So I ended up going with a chilled Grignolino d'Asti ('10?) and a 2011 Lioco Indica Rose, which worked quite well with the food. I know I've touted every one of Lioco's wines which I've had on here, but that rose is the best American rose I've ever had, Bedrock included.
post #13200 of 17918
I was wondering last night while drinking martinis. Do/can spirits have "terroir"?
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