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The Official Wine Thread - Page 866

post #12976 of 17526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

This. And why I asked about South Africa is because that is where it was created and that's the only place I know of that grows much of it. Please don't tell me BC growers are getting into Pinotage? That will be as bad as Ontario growers and all their lousy Baco Noir.
My best advice is if you like that wine, drink that wine. You just won't find a lot of fans of it in the wine drinking world.

It was 0.15% of grapes planted in BC last year, hardly important.
post #12977 of 17526
Enjoying my friend Jeff Ames' 2008 Napa Cab. His label is Rudius, and he's now bottling several cabs and some Rhone varietals. I think he' strikes a good balance between CA ripeness and, well, balance. This is clearly Californian, but not over done, it's one of the few Napa cabs I find drinkable.

467
post #12978 of 17526
Quote:
Originally Posted by tattersall View Post


It was 0.15% of grapes planted in BC last year, hardly important.

Good to hear!

I finally tracked down the Baco Noir grape. It's the same grape the French make Armagnac out of.
post #12979 of 17526
Yes some armagnac is from baco, but it's the blanc variety - the noir is another hybrid that's crossed with a very hardy grape that's indigenous to north armerica. It's mostly grown in Ontario as you said earlier.

In BC the similar phenomenon are these crazy german hybrids (ehrenfelser, bacchus, kerner) that were planted and thankfully are now being ripped up in favour of the more noble varieties - there is lots of this bad wine still being produced here unfortunately.
post #12980 of 17526
Quote:
thankfully are now being ripped up in favour of the more noble varieties

There is a secret movement in the UN to try this experiment on the Canadian people as well.
post #12981 of 17526
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

There is a secret movement in the UN to try this experiment on the Canadian people as well.

LOL icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #12982 of 17526
Quote:
Originally Posted by tattersall View Post

Yes some armagnac is from baco, but it's the blanc variety - the noir is another hybrid that's crossed with a very hardy grape that's indigenous to north armerica. It's mostly grown in Ontario as you said earlier.
In BC the similar phenomenon are these crazy german hybrids (ehrenfelser, bacchus, kerner) that were planted and thankfully are now being ripped up in favour of the more noble varieties - there is lots of this bad wine still being produced here unfortunately.

Most if not all of the Geisenheim-engineered varieties are just bad crossings, not hybrids. They are all vitis vinifera, whereas hybrids produced by Seyve, etc, are hybrids of vitis vinifera with North American species, like riparia, labrusca, or aestivalis. They're disease reststant and hardy, which is why they're used for Cognac and Armagnac - the grapes dont matter too much. And Kerner is actually a pretty cool variety - its made into some good wines in Germany, Austria, and Northern Italy.

Re Pinotage - there is some in New Zealand. Today we were evaluating library stock and I tasted a 2005 pinotage-Pinot noir-merlot. It was an unholy bastard of a wine. I'll assume it was a lapse in judgement for someone.
post #12983 of 17526
In a similar vein, while we were still harvesting pinot noir I saw examples of p.n.'s famous genetic instability. I saw both clusters that were halfway between Pinot noir and Pinot Gris, so half black and half red, and one Pinot Blanc cluster on a plant where the rest of the fruit was black.
post #12984 of 17526
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

This is interesting. I had a Pinot from the Waipara Valley last week. I thought it was great. The nose, like you mentioned was very interesting, not really a fruit that I could associate it with, but it had that same mushroomy finish. I have experienced this actually in a Pommard that I had recently as well. The Pommard was three times the price of the Waipara Valley Pinot (Can't remember the producer).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Which was it? The best I've had so far has probably been the Black Estate 2009, though I haven't had any Pegasus Bay yet. I should mention that many of the Charonnays that I've had here have been very good as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I can't recall, but I can find out. I was surprised though. It was the first and only NZ wine I have had.

Quatsch, I found out what it was it was a 2010 Stoneleigh "Marlborough" Pinot Noir. Very cheap, and I thought it was fantastic. Fruity, but dry with some earth on it. I highly recommend even for the price.
post #12985 of 17526
Had the 2009 of this last night. Really good. Tres French and classique. I imagine the 2010 will also be good. I plan on getting a few bottles of each for the Summer especially around $14. Blend of 80% Sauvignon Blanc and 20% Chardonnay. Tastes like a nice SB with a touch of body.

Cheverny_Blanc.jpg
post #12986 of 17526
Can somebody somehow define the "terroir" of the Loire Valley? I have had so many random things from there from so many different producers I feel that it is hard to get a grasp of the region. I guess one that stands out the most in my mind was a great Cab Franc that I had...
post #12987 of 17526
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapa View Post

Celebrating the completion of our kitchen, and my first knife skills class at FCI.
467

How was the Angelus? I haven't had a right bank wine with any significant age on it. I am curious how the characteristcs would be.
post #12988 of 17526
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Can somebody somehow define the "terroir" of the Loire Valley? I have had so many random things from there from so many different producers I feel that it is hard to get a grasp of the region. I guess one that stands out the most in my mind was a great Cab Franc that I had...

There's so much variety - it's a pretty big geography...

For me, for the whites, the traits I look for in the Loire are wines that are mineral and with noticeable but not overpowering acidity; the granite in the west and the limestone and marl as you head east. I don't know how I would describe what I like in the reds but I would say more freshness and floral (violets) notes than from other regions, nothing overly tannic. Grape varieties are quite diverse - melon de bourgogne, chenin blanc (pineau de loire), sauvignon blanc are the mains for whites and for reds it is cab franc, gamay, kot, grolleau, pineau d'Aunis, etc.

Some favorite producers by region:

Muscadet: Pepiere, Landron
Savenniere: Ch d'Epire, Baumard
Vouvray: Huet, Champalou
Chinon: Joguet; Baudry
Bourgeuil: Breton
Touraine: Puzelat, Clos Roche Blanche
Sancerre: Reverdy, Bourgeois
Pouilly: Dagueneau
post #12989 of 17526
Thanks for that. I know I have had great cab franc from Bourgeuil. Seemed almost textbook on the nose. Bell pepper, FTW.
post #12990 of 17526
Manton, have you seen my PM?

Also had a De Wet Chardonnay sur Lie '10. It's interesting. Fresh/fruity nose, quite acidic, strong and long-ish nutty aftertaste. Slight taste of alcohol. Not bad.
Edited by b1os - 5/7/12 at 4:29pm
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