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The Official Wine Thread - Page 809

post #12121 of 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

I wonder how it is they completely inhibit MLF. Do you know?

Temperature - malolactic bacteria operates best in the high 70s - low 80s. Lack of climate control in cellars is why it used to take a lot of wines so long to finish MF back in the day.
post #12122 of 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Temperature - malolactic bacteria operates best in the high 70s - low 80s. Lack of climate control in cellars is why it used to take a lot of wines so long to finish MF back in the day.

So it happens at high temps during fermentation or low temps during elevage?


D'oh. Just missed your edit. cool, thanks!
post #12123 of 18229
You'll get different opinions from different winemakers. The way I've always done it is to inoculate when alcoholic fermentation is nearly finished - I can't remember the numbers, but maybe when the wine is under 2 or 3 degrees brix (completely dry being in the negatives.)

I was taught that this helped to ensure a healthy and tidy malolactic fermentation - if it struggles and sputters along it can produce off-flavors. I think some people wait until alcoholic fermentation is completely finished though.
post #12124 of 18229
If it isn't innoculated, does it happen in all (or most) wines left in that temperature range long enough? Or are certain grape varieties more prone to natural ML than others?
post #12125 of 18229
It occurs naturally most of the time in red wines - inoculation is done to control the strain that does it, if you're concerned about that, or else just to give control over the MF fermentation. How much malic acid is even there is also a consideration - sometimes MF doesn't make much of a shift in PH.

Whites I'm not so sure on - most whites are fermented cold enough that MF isn't in the cards, if I'm right in my thinking. I suppose the strain of MF bacteria we used on the barrel chardonnay last year must have been able to handle slightly cooler temperatures - you want whites to ferment colder because it promotes aromatics and the kind of flavors you're looking for.

Edit: IIRC, the barrel chard was fermented at about 70 degrees in the barrel room during malolactic.
post #12126 of 18229
Last night I had a 2002 chateau grand bos from graves. Along with the almost metallic, minerally flavor I noticed some game. Enjoyed it very much.
post #12127 of 18229
Had an 06 Peay Scallop Shelf Pinot. Peay tends to make extra-beefy wines but 06 was a tough year and to my knowledge this vintage generally had a more elegant quality to it. I say this as I think the 06 growing conditions balanced out Peay's usual power. It's a very light coloured Pinot with a nice, clean typical CA Pinot nose. Not a fruit bomb by any means, quite restrained and...well, elegant. Firm structure though. I do not think this will get any better and I do think Froggie-philes will like this bottle. Highly recommended.
post #12128 of 18229
I was reading a bit about Peay Vineyards yesterday - I thought they had the reputation of making lighter wines in one of the chillier areas of the (real) Sonoma Coast?
post #12129 of 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Anybody know anything about Robin K. wines?

Well I had one a few nights ago. A Cab Sau, 2007 Sonoma. Much different than the bordeaux I have been drinking, it seemed much more like a dark fruit explosion, hot, less tannic. Expensive for what it was, imo. Won't get it again.
post #12130 of 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Realistically, do you guys think we(American wine-consuming public as a whole) will get past the current numbered-score rating obsession anytime in the near future?
I don't think so, at least in terms of the 'american wine-consuming public'.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I drink a lot Bord that never gets rated. I have no idea what # they would give it. Would rather they never bothered, as neglect keeps the prices down.
+1, though I have no idea if a lot of the stuff i try is rated or not. I don't care to know anymore and haven't looked up a rating in months (if not more)
post #12131 of 18229
I've only looked up a rating if I really liked something. It will then ususally be an eyebrow raiser, then I forget about it. I got into drinking wine and enjoying it before I really experienced popular ratings. I see no reason to drift my behavior any differently.
post #12132 of 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

I was reading a bit about Peay Vineyards yesterday - I thought they had the reputation of making lighter wines in one of the chillier areas of the (real) Sonoma Coast?

Q, I've been drinking Peay for a number of years now and met one of the two brothers, Andy, a couple of times at a maker's dinner. They tend to make more refined (relative to CA) yet powerful wines. Lower ETOH, better minerality, no lack of structure. No jammy fruit bombs here but wines that are built to get some bottle age.
post #12133 of 18229
Okay, I understand what you meant now. I was going to be disappointed if they were a jammy, inky, high-alc Cali pinot noir producer, which is what I thought you were implying. I was scoping them out as a place I might like to ask about doing an internship with next year - I really like wines from the true Sonoma Coast. In any event, I'll see if I can find any of their stuff around here.
post #12134 of 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Okay, I understand what you meant now. I was going to be disappointed if they were a jammy, inky, high-alc Cali pinot noir producer, which is what I thought you were implying. I was scoping them out as a place I might like to ask about doing an internship with next year - I really like wines from the true Sonoma Coast. In any event, I'll see if I can find any of their stuff around here.

I'll definitely echo what Pio said re: Peay. They are awesome cool climate pinots and syrahs built to age. Their chardonnay is excellent too.
post #12135 of 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post

Okay, I understand what you meant now. I was going to be disappointed if they were a jammy, inky, high-alc Cali pinot noir producer, which is what I thought you were implying. I was scoping them out as a place I might like to ask about doing an internship with next year - I really like wines from the true Sonoma Coast. In any event, I'll see if I can find any of their stuff around here.

The two brothers and Vanessa Wong (wife to the other brother and the wine maker) seem to have much respect given to them. Andy seems like a pretty good guy. You would never pick him out of the crowd for "Part Owner of a Winery and their Marketing Guy" though. He's about 6'5" and built like a bouncer.
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