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Do you wear a blazer? - Page 3

post #31 of 70
Hello All,

I'm a new member, and accidentally came across this site when I was researching about Vass shoes. I must say that I am thoroughly happy to have found this site.

Okay, so is a blazer only in dark blue with metal/leather/horn buttons?
What makes a sport coat a sport coat? Is it the cut/material/buttons? Does this give a more professional look?

I do love jackets and wear them almost daily. They seem to instantly add a certain element of style. My entire collection is based on having a distinctive texture or pattern.

I live in the South (Atlanta, GA), so most of them are in a lighter weight. My collection so far is as follows:
Brier of Amsterdam (I've never heard of them, but I get the most compliments on this one-I've never seen anything that was styled like this and after doing a search I discovered its based on a 30-40's look.) Light Brown Suede- 3 button, SB, Center Vent, Belted Back Patch Pockets
Zenga (Soft) Dark Brown wool blend, 3 button, SB, Center Vent, Patch Pocket
Zenga (Soft) Black Wool blend, 3 button, SB, Center Vent, Patch Pocket
Brioni, Silk Linen, Royal Blue with a subtle checkered pattern in various shades of blue and black, 3 button, SB, Double Vent
Broni, Beige Duponi Silk, 3 button, SB, Double Vent- This is the Jacket to my suit. Is it okay for me to separate this from the pants? It's just so hard to find an occasion to wear a silk suit.
Kiton, Brown Hounds-tooth, Cashmere Silk, 3 button, SB, Double Vent
post #32 of 70
Okay, so I desided on a 2B, SB notch lapel with 3 button working cuffs, and bought the buttons, a total of ten, 6 + 1 for the cuffs and 2 + 1 for the front. When they arrive I'll take them to my tailor. Now it comes down to the detail. Dark red velvet is my choice for the body of the coat, as dark a red as can be found, think black cherry. I'm still leaning towards a black collar, if not collar and lapel. shorter then my suit jackets, rather then coming down to near my finger tips, maybe closer to my wrist, just long enough to cover my backside. I'm looking for some input here. Thoughts, ideas whatever comes to mind! Dmntd
post #33 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmntd
Okay, so I desided on a 2B, SB notch lapel with 3 button working cuffs, and bought the buttons, a total of ten, 6 + 1 for the cuffs and 2 + 1 for the front. When they arrive I'll take them to my tailor.

Now it comes down to the detail.

Dark red velvet is my choice for the body of the coat, as dark a red as can be found, think black cherry. I'm still leaning towards a black collar, if not collar and lapel. shorter then my suit jackets, rather then coming down to near my finger tips, maybe closer to my wrist, just long enough to cover my backside.

I'm looking for some input here. Thoughts, ideas whatever comes to mind!

Dmntd


A bit costumy, (think Las Vegas stage wear) but if you can pull it off,
go for it. Are you having this made bespoke in LA? Care to say where?

Just don't go this far

post #34 of 70
This is closer to the color I have in mind, but not quite dark enough. Yes I'm having it made bespoke in LA, more then likely I'll take this job to Alwanis, hand felled canvas front & lapels for around $750.00 using my fabric.

Dmntd
post #35 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Millerp
I'd rather be dead then wear that
post #36 of 70
I too would like to hear opinions of blazer vs. sports coat vs. odd jacket masquerading as one of the other two. I didn't see anything in the FAQs or the wiki on this. I think it would be a great sticky.

I bought an orphaned navy Zegna jacket off Ebay and have been thinking of either keeping the original buttons or using pewter (I really disklike brass). However, I would not like to do so if there is something inherently different in the cut of a suit versus a blazer or sportsjacket that somebody with a better eye than I do can spot the difference--not that many people that I know _would_ know.

So, is a blazer just a sports coat with brass buttons?
Is a sports coat just a suit coat?
What, if any, cut differences are there between the three?

I tend to like "dark" colors, charcoal grey, blacks, etc. What dark colors would look good with a navy jacket both in slacks and shirts?
post #37 of 70
Didn't know before there was any dislike for the traditional navy blue blazer. I consider it a basic and fundamental garment to build any wardrobe.

The coat I have, which I consider my "navy blue blazer" is a solid cashmere wool and has horn, not brass buttons. It can be worn comfortably in either summer or winter time. Wear it with light gray, charcoal grey, taupe or willow green, olive green, and tan/sandy brown trousers, or cream Khakis. I stay away from navy blue slacks (the difference in the fabric between coat and pants would make it appear you were tying to avoid buying a real navy blue suit). However, I do pull it out and wear it with lighter colored blue jeans (medium blue as opposed to dark indigo). It is great in this "casual mode" better than a nylon windbreaker would be.

It differs from the five or six "blue sportcoats" I have in that they all have patters and/or textures (from multicolored yarns) in the fabric's weave.
post #38 of 70
I wear navy and club blazers with jeans, khakis or flanells trouser...at university, in bars, clubs, restaurants or at birthday parties and occasions like that...

a club blazer is a "must have", a navy blazer is also very usefull and versiatle
post #39 of 70
There appears to be some terminological confusion here. For those of you interested in such things, read the rest of this post. Those not interested are welcome to read it too, but please note that issues of terminology are "value-free," so please know that you can wear any garment you like no matter what it may be called.

A "sports jacket" is an odd jacket, that is a jacket not made with matching (same cloth) trousers. They are called "sports jackets" by some because they first became popular (about 100 years ago) as leisure and resort wear. They need not be cut any differently than a suit jacket. Sometimes they are cut looser and more roomy, however, either for comfort or to accomodate a bulky sweater. This is not a requirement or a standard practice. Detailing on odd jackets tends to be somewhat different. Or, to be more precise, there are more options. For instance, a very conservative dresser would say that slant pockets and ticket pockets are not appropriate on suits (except for tweeds) but no one disputes that they are fine on odd jackets.

A "blazer" is a specific type of odd jacket. Its true origin is murky. However, it appears to be descended from naval uniforms and/or the "reefer jacket." A classic blazer is blue, double-breasted and has metal (usually brass) buttons. These days, the term "blazer" tends to be used to signify any blue odd jacket, or even any odd jacket. As a matter of terminology, that is incorrect. A blue odd jacket without, for instance, metal buttons is not, strictly speaking, a blazer. It may be a wonderful garment; I have one myself. The fact that I don't consider it a blazer does not stop me from wearing or enjoying it. There are also some who believe that any color odd jacket with metal buttons is a blazer. Historically, there is more support for this view. Hunter green and dark red ("wine" or "burgundy") are the most common alternative colors. No one doubts that blue came first and is the "classic" color.

The blazer is also not cut differently than the suit coat. However, a really proper, historically correct blazer has a 4x2 button stance and three open patch pockets.
post #40 of 70
Thank you Manton. Dmntd
post #41 of 70
Several times now we've seen a divide emerge with respect to blue blazers and sportscoats. To those who see them as wholly conventional, I would suggest that they take a closer look--there is of course a lot of room for detailing in a blue jacket. For someone younger, because a blue jacket is *so* versatile, it's really worth thinking about how you can pull one together that feels right on you. It will go with everything. More lustrous fabrics, closer cuts, etc.
post #42 of 70
Absolutely essential. Incredibly verasyile. Unless you work as a lawyer, on Wall Street or a big 8 (is that the right number- I know they've consolidated) Accounting firm, it is the first piece of tailored clothing any man should own.

(Except for a black blazer of course)
post #43 of 70
chorse, I always thought you were older!

I'm also in my mid-twenties and in no way believe that wearing a navy sports jacket is going to make you look old. For reference, I wear mine to both work and class, and people generally seem to like how I dress. I think the cut of the jacket and shape of the shoulders is more important than the fact that it's navy. Obviously, you'll want to stay away from metal buttons for now. Personally, even when I'm 50 I can't see myself picking a traditional blazer over a navy sports jacket.

I think the most important thing (I would say this for most people) is to have very lightly padded shoulders. My thinking is this, if the shoulder is too padded, it just doesn't look good and that's where you'll run in to trouble with looking older. Having said that, I think it's less the danger of looking older than the danger of looking boring or regular, which a poorly-executed shoulder will contribute to. Of course, the shoulder you decide on depends in part on your frame, but what I'm getting at is that in a lot of ways, I think the shoulder is what makes the jacket a success or a failure. A poorly done shoulder makes the whole jacket look bad, regardless of the fabric it's in or whether or not it fits.

Btw, I wear a jacket almost every day, and I don't get any flak from anyone, even though I'm the only person in my surroundings that wears them. I highly recommend adding some to your wardrobe because they'll help you stand-out from the crowd in a positive way. If you're still concerned about looking old or boring in a navy jacket, you could always add color with your shirt. Btw, will you be wearing it with or without tie?
post #44 of 70
Never since I was a little boy.
post #45 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Never since I was a little boy.

This, I think, helps explain the common aversion to the blazer. Too often they carry memories of being uncomfortable childhood "dress-up" clothes. Their plight is then compounded by the sheer number of terrible blazers out there. They're often poorly cut, poorly fitted, poorly made. It's easy for them to look very cheap, too -- the gold buttons being a prime offender. The blazer might be second only to the DB suit in terms of being unjustly represented by shoddy work.

I was always tepid on the blazer until I finally came across an exceptional one. Very conservative two-button, double vented, with hand-stitched lapels. But what made it come alive were the buttons: plain, with no design, but in shiny gold. Against the navy background, they popped. They were eye-grabbing without being ostentatious, and they didn't look cheap. Suddenly I understood. All my reservations about gold buttons vanished. To this day that coat remains one of the most treasured garments in my wardrobe. I still smile when I button the top button and see it catch the light.
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