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This is for Tokyo Slim (but not the iPod part): - Page 3

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by briancl
i told him to move his seat up so that his wrists can rest comfortably on the top of the steering wheel with a little bend at the elbow...

To expand on Brian's good advice, this is done with your back fully against your seat. The original idea is that you can do a full 180-degree steering wheel turn without moving your hands from the 3- and 9-o'clock positions on the wheel. However, in modern cars with steering wheel airbags that deploy at over 200 MPH, the criss-crossing of your arms this can cause may not be the best position to be in for a crash, and you may want to shuffle steer instead. But it has lots of other benefits in addition to being able to press the clutch without tiring out your leg: you have finer motor control of the steering wheel and better feel of the car through the wheel if you aren't hanging onto it because you're leaned so far back, along with some amount of shock absorbtion through bent elbows should you hit something. If you look at in-car footage of race car drivers, note how closely they sit to the wheel, and how bent their elbows are.

Also, 200 MPH airbags are another reason not to undergrip the steering wheel where you put your arm into the steering wheel and grip the top of the wheel from underneath. A deploying airbag will do wonders for hyperextending your elbow. Same thing for people who drive with one hand at 12 o'clock: an airbag will make you punch yourself. These are apparently not uncommon injuries seen in the ER.

While you're at it, you can set your side mirrors for best visibility too. For the left mirror, lean to your left until your head is against the window, and adjust the mirror out until you can just barely see the side of your car. For the right mirror, lean to the right so your head is in the middle of the car, and do the same adjustment. A consequence of this is that in your normal driving position, you won't be able to see your car in your side mirrors, which some people find comforting for some reason, but is not important. However, you now have much greater visibility. Ideally, just as a vehicle is leaving your side mirrors, it should be entering your central rear view mirror --- your blind spots are greatly reduced. However, you still have to look over your shoulders before turning.

--Andre
post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by briancl
actually, this reminds me of my college roommate. he was new to driving manual, and also just started going to grad school at UCLA... and we all know the problems with LA traffic. he mentioned that his left leg kept getting tired while driving around LA. when i was visiting, i noticed he was sitting too far back. i told him to move his seat up so that his wrists can rest comfortably on the top of the steering wheel with a little bend at the elbow... that brought him much closer to the correct driving position, and his left leg was bent more as opposed to being straight out... so that he could apply pressure to the clutch with less effort....

he no longer has the tired left leg problems.

correct driving position does wonders for driving fatigue.

that said, i've got a pretty stiff clutch pedal on my car, and i drive through plenty of traffic... and i never think that i need a different car.

I was driving my car in the correct position, and in heavy traffic my leg would give out after the first 1 ½ hours of constantly going from 1st to 2nd, down to 1st, stop, to 1st, stop, 1st, 2nd, 1st, 2nd, 1st, stop, etc...

Jon.
post #33 of 38
You manual transmission enthusists are too much! This isn't like arguing how Edward Greens are better than Kenneth Coles. There are advantages and disadvantages to both kinds of transmission, but in the end it comes down to personal preference. I don't see any point in judging someone based on their rational preference.
post #34 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renault78law
You manual transmission enthusists are too much! This isn't like arguing how Edward Greens are better than Kenneth Coles. There are advantages and disadvantages to both kinds of transmission, but in the end it comes down to personal preference. I don't see any point in judging someone based on their rational preference.

They are just jealous that a transmission system like the DSG gets better gas mileage and shifts faster than manual transmission.

Jon.
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
They are just jealous that a transmission system like the DSG gets better gas mileage and shifts faster than manual transmission.

It probably shifts faster, but that's neither here nor there since there's generally only one speed at which a transmission will shift without unduly wearing its synchros. And it's not as fast as BMW's SMG2 if speed is all you care about.

But why does it get better gas mileage? It's heavier, has slightly more losses, and has more things to break.

Besides DSG is OK in my book because it's basically like a manual in operation. It's slushboxes I don't like.

--Andre
post #36 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew
It probably shifts faster, but that's neither here nor there since there's generally only one speed at which a transmission will shift without unduly wearing its synchros. And it's not as fast as BMW's SMG2 if speed is all you care about.

But why does it get better gas mileage? It's heavier, has slightly more losses, and has more things to break.

Besides DSG is OK in my book because it's basically like a manual in operation. It's slushboxes I don't like.

--Andre

Well, luckily I don't have a slushbox then...

Jon.
post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
They are just jealous that a transmission system like the DSG gets better gas mileage and shifts faster than manual transmission.

Jon.

I didn't buy my car for the gas mileage.. or choose the transmission based on its savings. Clutches are expensive to replace.. as are torque converters and clutchless manuals and CVT's or whatever fancy new gizmo is shifting gears for people these days.

When it all comes down to it, I chose manual because its fun.
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renault78law
You manual transmission enthusists are too much! This isn't like arguing how Edward Greens are better than Kenneth Coles. There are advantages and disadvantages to both kinds of transmission, but in the end it comes down to personal preference. I don't see any point in judging someone based on their rational preference.
Because there are not two rational preferences. One of the two options is objectively superior! Assume two transmissions, one a slushy and the other a manual, with the same number of gears and same ratios. Here's how the comparison will work out. Objective advantages of a manual: -Lower mass -Better fuel economy -Quicker acceleration -Easier to repair, because there's less to go wrong and all of it is mechanical rather than being partially computerized. Objective advantages of a slushbox: -Allows people with one leg to drive -Lower maintenance costs for the uncoördinated Subjective advantages of a manual: -Fosters a feeling of connectedness with the automobile if done right -Often prevents the execution of tasks fundamentally stupid when one is controlling a lethal machine, such as checking the BlackBerry, shaving/ applying make-up, and eating Subjective advantages of a slushbox: -None There's a reason the slushbox was invented by Buick: it's a device for feckless posers who don't know anything or care anything about the driving experience. If forced to choose between putting my feet on two pedals in Edward Greens or putting them on three pedals in Kenneth Coles, I guess I would have to become a duckbill fan.
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