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why get a motorcycle when you could get a Vespa

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
so while the site was down in the last month or so i decided to purchase a new Vespa LX 150. even since i was a kid and my parents took me to Rome i have always been fascinated by them - but at the time they were not being imported to the states - and i didn't have the money to buy one anyway - well now i do and i have to say it really enhances the city lifestyle. anyway was curious as to what everyone on here thought of them - as my friends have had mixed reactions........

post #2 of 59
Get a small bike, not a Vespa. BMW F 650 CS: Jon.
post #3 of 59
I would love to get one, but it's impossible for me. My building has no elevator, there's no indoor garage close enough, and it would be stolen if I parked it on the street.
post #4 of 59
you got a vespa for the uniqueness? odd

having being born in a country where scooters (i.e. vepas) are the norm, rather than the oddity, i've always considered scooters to be for countries that can't afford bikes

no intent to slight your decision, of course - i kinda like your idea, and would drive a vespa w/ no hesitation whatsoever
post #5 of 59
They are definitely easier to jump on and use than a motorcycle, but I really like having the power to get out of scary situations. Plus, they are less visible and the people riding them seem to wear very little gear, like those half helmets as if they don't really enjoy having a chin. I just don't get it.
post #6 of 59
In America, they're seen as effeminate and wimpy. Silly as that may be, I wouldn't drive one here. They're not very useful for long distance travelling, which there is lots of in America (notsomuch for NYC, where, if you have parking, they can be very nice, but I'd be surprised if you can get parking for it). Plus, half the cars out there are light trucks and SUVs. Too many assholes on the road for me to feel comfortable on a scooter.
post #7 of 59
Thread Starter 
i never said i got it for the "uniqueness" although they are much more rare here than they are in the rest of the developed (and emerging) world

as for the power mine tops out at over 65 - which i think is plenty for NYC, and being that i fear destroying my face i do wear a full face helmet (as far at the govt is concerned - it is a motorcycle)

just my thoughts on it - and the design is rather timeless - and dare i say "stylish"
post #8 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mylesmyles
i never said i got it for the "uniqueness" although they are much more rare here than they are in the rest of the developed (and emerging) world

as for the power mine tops out at over 65 - which i think is plenty for NYC, and being that i fear destroying my face i do wear a full face helmet (as far at the govt is concerned - it is a motorcycle)

just my thoughts on it - and the design is rather timeless - and dare i say "stylish"
By power, I mean acceleration, not top end speed. My bike basically tops out at 90, but it goes from scary place to safe place much faster than a scooter can. Plus I can haul another person and/or a bunch of gear, if I want to, safely.
post #9 of 59
Thread Starter 
J - your point is well taken - but i guess for my city needs my Vespa has been great -

and as for it being effeminite......

post #10 of 59
J, how does rain impact the utility of your bike? I'd always assumed owning a bike was basically a luxury because you couldn't use it as your exclusive vehicle.
post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
J, how does rain impact the utility of your bike? I'd always assumed owning a bike was basically a luxury because you couldn't use it as your exclusive vehicle.
Rain isn't fun, but it's mostly because people drive (even more) like total morons in the rain. Once the rain has been going for 1/2 hour or so, it has washed most of the oil off the road so it's not that slippery, and if you know what you're doing it's not that bad riding on wet roads. It's the people who can see even less (if they were bothering to look) that you need to worry about. With the gear I have now I don't really mind riding in the rain at all, but I choose not to on days that I know it's going to be dim and wet all day.

It is sort of a luxury, but it is very enjoyable, cheaper to maintain and fuel, and allows me to use the carpool lanes and get through traffic much faster.
post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mylesmyles
J - your point is well taken - but i guess for my city needs my Vespa has been great -

and as for it being effeminite......


No, that's still pretty effeminite.

If you like it: cool. But they always seemed synonomous with Starbucks and Banana Republic and Young Urban Professionals to me. If you want something similar but don't want gaydar going off all around you, I'd get a moped.
post #13 of 59
every second expat out here rides a vintage Vespa or Lambretta. Exactly the reason why i dont. The newer ones like you have just invested in are, like THE scooter to have for young rich VNese.

Completely aspirational.

Its like a Vietnamese Lamborghini.

In turn, Vietnam is one of the biggest markets in the world for Piaggio.

Another weird piece of trivia here, marketers here have successfully positioned the word 'scooter' as above 'motorbike' in the transportation foodchain...it goes bicycle for poor, motorbike for everyone, scooter for rich people, cars for the ultra rich.

one of my favorite things about living here is watching these rules be written for the first time.
post #14 of 59
I like Vespas, but my favorite city commuting utensil (except for mass transit) is the BMW C1. Unfortunately it is not sold in the US. If it were, I would buy one for daily commuting and keep the much less efficient Mini just for hikes that involve interstates. I disagree with this guy that it would be good for cities like ATL or Dallas, though. Riding something like that in such a town is a death wish. But in a more built up city or a college town I think it would be great.
post #15 of 59
I'd drive one. But those old-school mopeds with pedals are pretty cool too.

Do you lock up the vespa on the street? Why wouldn't it be just as desirable for someone to steel it as a mini-Moto?


are the vintage Vespas in Viet Nam inexpensive? I wonder if there'd be a market to export them -- or if all the stuff in them has been replaced over the years, just like the 50's cars in Cuba?
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