or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › Which movie are you dying to see?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Which movie are you dying to see? - Page 6

post #76 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aristocrat
Oldboy is one of the best movies ever made!

Oldboy is great. Lady Vengeance is even better!!

Cant wait til BORAT!!!

"throw the jew down the well...so my country can be free..!!"
post #77 of 343
You really should try to see Oldboy. From what I understand there is a Hollywood version of the movie in the works. The fight scene in the hallway has to be one of my favorites.
post #78 of 343
Interested too, in the new film about George Reeves . . . out next month: I think it's called HOLLYWOODLAND. Another, enduring mystery from Hollywood's lurid storehouses. Also, the Black Dahlia . . .
post #79 of 343
I, too, was really looking forward to The Black Dahlia, though it's getting pretty weak reviews. It was a whole lotta book--maybe too much for a feature-length movie to handle. I'll see for myself, maybe this weekend.
post #80 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoreman1782
I, too, was really looking forward to The Black Dahlia, though it's getting pretty weak reviews. It was a whole lotta book--maybe too much for a feature-length movie to handle. I'll see for myself, maybe this weekend.

Yeah, I'm kinda bummed about the reviews (although De Palma has always been a pretty polarizing director). Most of the reviews (even the good ones) seem to state that the film has middle of the second act to third act problems. Just about all of them cite a confusing plotline. More often than not, the performance of Josh Hartnett is mentioned as weak. Everyone seems to agree that Aaron Eckhart is the strongest actor in the movie, but that he dissappears about halfway through (although this mirrors what happens to his character in the book). People seem split on how good/bad Scarlett Johanssen and Hillary Swank are.

I love Ellroy's L.A. "Quartet", but it's some pretty dense stuff (particularly for crime fiction), and I imagine adapting it for the screen is very difficult. I saw L.A. Confidential before I read the book, and I'm amazed that someone was able to put together a coherent script based on that book that was less than 5 hours long (of course, they did it by cutting out huge portions of the book, but the movie stands on its own quite solidly).
post #81 of 343
Brian DePalma is difficult to judge as a contemporary filmmaker.

A few of his movies, like Scarface and Carlito's Way took YEARS for people to realize how great they were. In 1984 De Palma recieved the Razzie for "worst director" for Scarface. Sort of hard to believe since in the 20 years following the Razzie, its been immortalized as maybe one of the greatest movies of the 80's, and one of Pacino's best roles.
post #82 of 343
im looking forward to the fountain and the prestige.
post #83 of 343
Hollywoodland, was a disappointment. I WAS, eager to see the Black Dahlia. Now, that seems like it could be a waste of time. Next, All the King's Men. The trailer strikes me a cornball, to say the least. The original, 1949 version is a classic.
post #84 of 343
Black Dahlia was a good book, I'd like to see that. Borat and the Fountain of Youth too. Then there is always For Your Consideration, whenever that happens to be coming out.
post #85 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by cultpop 0217
im looking forward to the fountain and the prestige.
Both those look fantastic, I'm especially intrigued by The Prestige. I can't wait for: -Jesus Camp -All the King's Men And recently I watched Prime, I was utterly surprised. Great cast, story, and very funny. Fantastic date movie. And everyone needs to see BRICK, it's a film noir set in a modern day Cali high school. Some of the best dialogue I've heard in a long time, and just freakin' stylish as hell. A.
post #86 of 343
The only "new" releases I give two shits about are (Wes) Anderson's The Fantastic Mr. Fox, (P.T.) Anderson's There Will Be Blood (loosely based on Upton Sinclair's Oil), Van Sant's Paranoid Park, which looks to be his strongest effort yet, and Edward Yang's The Wind (for those that haven't seen Yi Yi yet please do; it's the best film of the century thus far).

What I'm really, really looking forward to, however, is the Criterion release of Pandora's Box. My God, I've waited forever for this (in my opinion, Pabst best), and it's going to be such a great birthday present.
post #87 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rome
You really should try to see Oldboy. From what I understand there is a Hollywood version of the movie in the works. The fight scene in the hallway has to be one of my favorites.


NO! NO! They nixed it Thank God!

Check out Three...Extremes, a collection of three short films by the three best Korean film makers in the world! Chan-wook edition is grand! as is Fruit Chan's-the last one is confusing, you'll have to watch that maybe 3 times to understand it.
post #88 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBZ
Yeah, I'm kinda bummed about the reviews (although De Palma has always been a pretty polarizing director). Most of the reviews (even the good ones) seem to state that the film has middle of the second act to third act problems. Just about all of them cite a confusing plotline. More often than not, the performance of Josh Hartnett is mentioned as weak. Everyone seems to agree that Aaron Eckhart is the strongest actor in the movie, but that he dissappears about halfway through (although this mirrors what happens to his character in the book). People seem split on how good/bad Scarlett Johanssen and Hillary Swank are.

I love Ellroy's L.A. "Quartet", but it's some pretty dense stuff (particularly for crime fiction), and I imagine adapting it for the screen is very difficult. I saw L.A. Confidential before I read the book, and I'm amazed that someone was able to put together a coherent script based on that book that was less than 5 hours long (of course, they did it by cutting out huge portions of the book, but the movie stands on its own quite solidly).

I saw The Black Dahlia this past weekend. I can see where people have problems with it. The plot does get complicated, and they wrap up things a little too quick at the end, which could leave you scratching your head. Being a fan of James Ellroy, I was ready for the immense amount of characters and the criss-crossing plot lines, but people who aren't as familiar with his work could easily be lost. Perhaps if they made the film even 30 minutes longer they could've cleared things up better.

One of the biggest complaints is that the movie is called The Black Dahlia but the actual murder and investigation sort of takes a back seat to the characters, and is really only a small part of the movie. But the trailers for the movie focus on the murder, making it seem that the investigation is the focus, disappointing many people. Again, its totally Ellroy.

This being said, I really enjoyed the film. I like film noir, and this is a good noir, albeit slightly complicated. They did a great job of recreating the look and feel of the time its set. None of the actors really did a bad job, although Hillary Swank and the woman who plays her mother are a little too over the top, sometimes too overacting. Mia Kushner is great in her small role of The Dahlia, seen only in old casting films and a 1940s softcore. You see the character as a really person, just a regular girl who got caught up in something and got killed in the process, and you really feel for her.

Not the worst movie I ever saw, not the best either, but still enjoyable.
post #89 of 343
I also saw The Black Dahlia this weekend and have a slightly different take. I didn't think the acting was very good. Scarlett Johanson looked great in all those sweaters, but there were times when I wasn't sure whether her character was still breathing. Josh Hartnett was overmatched. He just hasn't developed the emotional range as an actor to tackle this character. Aaron Eckhart was okay, but not great, IMHO. I think Hillary Swank just decided to have fun with her character, as did the people playing her family. This might have worked in a stronger film, but it was ultimately just distracting here. Some of the dialogue was mumbled, which made the plot that much harder to follow. Since so much of Ellroy's work is about dialogue, it'd be nice to actually hear it. Also, they screwed up their timeline in a couple of places.

The plot was convoluted, which is fine, but I felt this went too far. Not enough was explained at the end. I have read Black Dahlia , but it was years ago, so I don't remember it that well. Ellroy is a tough read, and has a very intricate and particular writing style. His plots are often convoluted, and he often uses major historical events as the backdrop for his novels. I find the novels to be more about people than events, but that the events are utilized to shape or change the psyches of his characters. As I said above, I think it must be a real challenge to translate Ellroy to a film script. However, I think the screenwriter missed the mark here (and Black Dahlia is probably the most conventionally written of the four novels that make up the Quartet). Ellroy's plots are convoluted, but he ties them together well (sometimes, admittedly, I've needed to re-read certain sections to get the whole thing). I just didn't feel the movie tied together very well.

Finally, I do agree that the stylization was great. The dialogue, costumes, and settings all had a wonderfully noir feel to them (other than the scenes in Hillary Swank's home, which had some sort of a Fellini/Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? vibe about them). DePalma certainly knows how to use a camera (the tracking scene just before the first big shoot out, which has been cited by many critics, was certainly outstanding). He's also reached the point in his career where people can accuse him of ripping himself off, instead of just Alfred Hitchcock (the scene in the hotel on the stairs was very reminiscent of The Untouchables). Sometimes I think DePalma makes his films purposefully to get a rise out of the critics. I think he enjoys it.

I'd give the movie a solid C, except that both Scarlett Johansson and Hillary Swank were involved in sex scenes, and neither one of them got topless. Also, it didn't help in my viewing that there were a couple of older women sitting directly behind me and, everytime a new woman came onto the screen, one of them would whisper to the other, "is that the Black Dahlia?" Thus, I'm giving it a C-.
post #90 of 343
This coming weekend, looking forward to Jackass 2 and American Hardcore
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Entertainment and Culture
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › Which movie are you dying to see?