or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Show us your Chan
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Show us your Chan - Page 39

post #571 of 707
A tailor needs to be very skilled to make the lightweight numbers work because they might not be as easy to work with and get a clean fit. Even a slight pitch problem is magnified because the fabric is so light. Conversely, most people can get by with a RTW overcoat, because the fabric is so heavy it drapes right over the body and still looks good.

SR tailors also do like H & S and those are almost always the first books out on the table when one specifies a pattern one is interested in -- might be because the cloth is good and they have a huge range, or it might be because they get the cloth for cheap. It's anybody's guess.
It's mainly people on here and on the LL who are skeptical of H & S. I don't have many suits made out of H & S to be able to comment conclusively on that, but I must say that my Chan suit out of the 8-9 oz Super 130s doesn't have a clean fit, however, this might not be due to the inherent properties of the fabric itself.

Jeffreyd wrote a while back that Supers are not always bad, and some are actually quite good because they're densely woven.
post #572 of 707
I've two Chan suits from H&S Target which is an S120. One has fantastic body and drapes well. The other is okay but a bit flimsy. Suit jacket is fine, but pants don't hang as well. Both are from the same book but are very different fabrics. The colors and patterns of both are fantastic.
post #573 of 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Pink View Post

I think for a first suit, I would probably agree, but, for some follow up fittings in Hong Kong, I did work with a junior cutter and he did a very good and careful job, and probably took more time than Patrick would have. Of course, Patrick had already cut my pattern.

The striking and cutting of the initial pattern is so important, I don't know if I want to risk it. Of course there is no guarantee that my pattern will be perfect on my first suit with Patrick, but it seems like a better bet. I don't mind micromanaging tailors to some extent, but I was hoping to avoid that with Chan.

Thanks to all for the feedback.
post #574 of 707
When you say you 'micro-manage' your tailor, what exactly do you mean? Out of curiosity, what is it you specify?
post #575 of 707
Well, with some of the more 'economical' tailors one has to be very insistent on what one wants. Though they may seem accommodating, you need to nudge them in the right direction at times, especially if you ask for things that are not their house-style. Plus, I believe some tailors are better than others with small details. So you need to really check their work.

I was under the impression with Chan, I'd have less to worry about.
post #576 of 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by dan'l View Post

Well, with some of the more 'economical' tailors one has to be very insistent on what one wants. Though they may seem accommodating, you need to nudge them in the right direction at times, especially if you ask for things that are not their house-style. Plus, I believe some tailors are better than others with small details. So you need to really check their work.

I was under the impression with Chan, I'd have less to worry about.

FWIW my impression of Patrick is that he's happy for customers to specify their preferences and is capable of executing a variety of styles. For example, the "traditional" house style of Chan is "British" but I've only ever seen Patrick or his assistant in very soft, slim jackets in what they call their "Neapolitan" style, and I've seen them like 8-9 times over the past few years.
post #577 of 707
I'm not sure that Chan's house style is really 'British' in any real sense anymore though -- though I'd have no doubt that it probably was back then. I think I've seen more of their mock-Italian stuff floating around than I have of their mock-British stuff (if any at all).
post #578 of 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

I'm not sure that Chan's house style is really 'British' in any real sense anymore though -- though I'd have no doubt that it probably was back then. I think I've seen more of their mock-Italian stuff floating around than I have of their mock-British stuff (if any at all).

I haven't seen them doing traditional British shape for a while. What I gather is my dad's cutter from Chan is not Patrick, and my dad always gets the structured garments with heavy canvass. Like my brown suit if you recall my friend.
post #579 of 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

I haven't seen them doing traditional British shape for a while. What I gather is my dad's cutter from Chan is not Patrick, and my dad always gets the structured garments with heavy canvass. Like my brown suit if you recall my friend.

Yup, I do remember!
post #580 of 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by johanm View Post

Personally I would pass on Chan if I wasn't getting fitted by Patrick. The fitter / cutter is the difference-maker in the bespoke process, and Patrick is very knowledgeable and skilled and understands the bespoke terminology/concepts/trends discussed on Styleforum. Also I have been unimpressed by the non-Patrick stuff I've seen posted online.

+2
Quote:
Originally Posted by johanm View Post

Yes Patrick is the head cutter that does their overseas trips. I'd stick to him if you're interested in a long term relationship.

Indeed; in fact, if he were to leave to go to another place or set up his own shop, I would probably follow.
post #581 of 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by dan'l View Post

I read some negative comments regarding Frontier in the "Unfunded Liabilities" thread (i.e. lifeless, limp). I wonder what explains the differences in opinion? Or does it really just come down to personal preference?

I have my workhorse dark grey suit made up from the Frontier book, done by Chan. I am very happy with the durability so far, about 2 years in. I tend to wear it for travel and multiple days at a time. It does a great job. If i had to change one thing, I would prefer slightly more texture to it like a sharskin, rather than more of a simple twill. The price was reasonable too - I think it circa $1500.
post #582 of 707
Is anyone else still waiting on their order from the November tour? I received my shirts over a month ago, but still no suit and trousers. I've previously received my order before the following tour date, but that has now come and gone.
post #583 of 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by HEPennypacker View Post

Is anyone else still waiting on their order from the November tour? I received my shirts over a month ago, but still no suit and trousers. I've previously received my order before the following tour date, but that has now come and gone.

Still waiting for the vest of a three piece suit ordered in November. Received the jacket and pants but probably only because I was in Hong Kong in late December and early January and had additional fittings while I was there. The suit I ordered last July arrived several weeks after Chan's November visit.
post #584 of 707
Haven't received my November order. Shame since I have an appointment with Chan in LA tomorrow to commission a jacket and was hoping for Patrick to address any issues with the November order. Guess it will have to wait till July (or better yet, hopefully no issues at all).

And are we sure Patrick is still a cutter? I thought he used to be, but was promoted to some sort of manager. Didn't realize he was still involved in working with the cloth directly.
post #585 of 707
When I was in the Kowloon Store last August, he was definitely marking out and cutting cloth on those big tables they have.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Show us your Chan