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Show us your Chan - Page 23

post #331 of 687
Quote:
Originally Posted by ltontheqt View Post

I want to pose a variant on the question about a basted fitting. I too am about to see Chan (in New York) for the first time. What are the chances of getting a reasonably good fit on the first shot? There seems to be some disagreement on this. Alternatively, would I be better off visiting a competent local tailor (I'm in the Philadelphia area) so as to get a basted fitting and have adjustments made without incurring the delays? Secondly, given my finances and usage, I suspect this will be the only suit I have made. I want something nice for events at work and, frankly, for a family funeral that is on the horizon. Is a mid-gray in a mid-weight the way to go? I appreciate the advice.

Are you talking about getting your Chan garment in basted form and then having it finished up by the "competent local tailor," or are you talking about having the suit made up from scratch by the local tailor in lieu of getting one from Chan? If it is the first, I would strongly counsel against it--seems fraught with peril and likely to piss off all parties concerned, especially you; in the second case, it's entirely your call.

I might mention I had a well-respected local tailor, who had done a very good job rebuilding one of my last RTW jackets, make of botch of my last RTW suit when I tried to have him work similar magic on it. Actually, I wasn't too P.O.'ed, because it gives me a good rationale for ordering another Chan or two.

Medium-weight, medium gray sounds like a very good idea for a "one and only suit." It's what Manton recommends in his book The Suit. Plain navy would be your other obvious option.
post #332 of 687
It's either/or. I would never mix local and traveling tailors.
post #333 of 687
Quote:
Originally Posted by ltontheqt View Post

It's either/or. I would never mix local and traveling tailors.

+1 There's no way that could end well.
post #334 of 687
I'd say that your chances of getting a good fit are always better with a basted fitting than without. The basted fitting allows for a lot of corrections and adjustments.

That said, however, fit is one thing and silhouette is another. There are plenty of photos on the web of the kinds of silhouette Chan can deliver. Who is your Philadelphia tailor? Do you know what kinds of silhouette they can deliver, and whether you can get the one you want from them?

For one's only (semi-) bespoke suit, what you propose sounds like a good purchase. I'd go for English-woven fabric, 12 oz, smooth finish, little sheen. That should last you a good while and be versatile.
post #335 of 687
The local tailor I have in mind is a fellow named John DiPietro. He has altered a garment or two for me, but I have never commissioned custom work from him. He seems rather imperious, so that raises concerns. However, he does have lots of experience and a decent reputation from what I gather. I'm also not sure whether he would have access to the range of fabrics available to Chan.
post #336 of 687
Hi All,

I learned a lot about the HK suit scene from this and other threads, and thought that I would give back a little by providing a bit of a review of my experience with WW Chan thus far.

I was in HK for three days last month and managed to fit in a visit to WW Chan to begin the suit commissioning process. Due to my short trip, I was only able to go through the initial measurements, design discussion, and fabric selection and not the basted fitting. However, since Patrick & co were already planning on passing through DC where I live about a month later, I had them mail me the basted suit so we could have a proper second fitting appointment during their visit. I then agreed to return my basted suit to them in the mail for them to finish the product in HK.

Overall, I was (like everyone else here) very impressed with the service I received. I cannot yet speak to the quality and the fit of the end product since I have not yet received it, but I will be sure to post updates here when I can. The only negative experience I had through this whole process was the cost of having them ship me the basted suit from HK to the US. Patrick & co. added an additional $200 USD to the price of my suit bringing the total somewhere around $1,500 including postage. I thought it was expensive at the time, but also thought that there might be some kind of special procedure or packaging for basted suits. Instead, I received my suit folded in a very compact box about the size of my laptop (around 17"x12"x2") via FedEx. Maybe there were some additional man hours I have not yet considered that were involved in this process, but either way, I was disappointed by the high price. That said, I am hoping that the quality and fit of the final product make up for it, as I am sure they will.

To tide you over until my final review, here is a picture of my basted suit. Still kind of hard to figure out what the actual end product will be based on this unstructured garment, but I have high hopes. I realize the pants look pretty weird in this picture, but dark jacket in the background that appears in the space between my legs as well as the fact that the pants were full of pins at the time kind of makes the ensemble look a little bit weirder than it really was.

467
post #337 of 687
Quote:
Originally Posted by johanm View Post

Here is a navy suit made from Harrisons 12 oz. (also same as posted in Dec, except now worn a few times)
untitledpic3.jpg

Wow, this suit is amazing. Very nicely done. The cut is fabulous and the pants are very flattering. I hope to achieve a similar look.
post #338 of 687
Quote:
Originally Posted by tipitai View Post

Hi All,
I learned a lot about the HK suit scene from this and other threads, and thought that I would give back a little by providing a bit of a review of my experience with WW Chan thus far.

Looks pretty good and glad you got to meet with them in HK. Personally, I'd lower the length a bit along with the pockets and button stance which all seem a bit high. You could also add more drape in the chest, extend the shoulders 1/4 inch and nip the center of the waist a slight touch, but that's all personal preference. The trousers look nice and comfy.
post #339 of 687
Got a dark brown Minnis fresco suit a few months back and now have time to post pics. Fits like my other stuff, so that wouldn't be so interesting. But what is interesting is the construction:
1058
1058
Someone once posted that they can't or wouldn't do self-fabric front lining. They don't like to for some reason, but they definitely can do it and do it well.

Unseen is a very lightweight canvas that yfyf said was a new development. The jacket feels very soft and comfortable because of the canvas and perhaps also in part because of the give of the self-fabric fronts and lack of taping in other places. I don't know though. If someone else does and would like to share any possible pros and cons of self-fabric fronts and untaped exposed seams, I'd appreciate it.
post #340 of 687
^ That is a quarter-lined, or buggy-lined jacket. Many custom jackets and even some RTW are made that way.
post #341 of 687

Apropos of nothing in particular, can we have a similarly titled thread for Kent Wang merchandise?

post #342 of 687
Slightly better pic:
934
post #343 of 687
Quote:
Originally Posted by tipitai View Post

Wow, this suit is amazing. Very nicely done. The cut is fabulous and the pants are very flattering. I hope to achieve a similar look.

Looks perfect to me!
post #344 of 687
empty, do you find it wears cooler than similar jackets? I have a buggy-lined jacket which I am pretty sure wears warmer than a similar 1/2 lined one due to the front essentially having 2 layers of outer shell cloth as it is self-faced.
post #345 of 687
Mark, that looks nice. I hope to see it in person sometime.
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