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Can Slow Running Watch Be Fixed?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm reaching out to all the watch hounds on the forum (GDL and co.).

I got a Seiko automatic for X-Mas from my better half and I've noticed that it is running a bit slow. I would estimate that it is losing maybe 30 sec per day.

Is this something that can be fixed and if so about how much would it cost?
post #2 of 15
Guide for DIY regulation of the 7S26 movement
post #3 of 15
Sure. Leave the face, and get a new spankin' movement inside. Better yet, I hear there's this new fangled thing called Quartz that's rather accurate at keeping time. Just a suggestion...
post #4 of 15
Short answer: Yes--shouldn't be too much. Longer answer: If you're going to walk in the world of mechanical (don't discount hand-wound) watches, then you should try to develop a relationship with a watchmaker/AD. It shouldn't cost to much to have a watch regulated. Having said that, you could always try to regulate the watch yourself--see the link in wacked's post.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies, especially the article that Whacked linked to.

Does anybody know of a good resource to find a reputable watchmaker/AD in my area (NE Ohio)? I know I could try the Yellow Pages, but that's sort of like throwing a dart at a map.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggskip View Post
Thanks for the replies, especially the article that Whacked linked to.

Does anybody know of a good resource to find a reputable watchmaker/AD in my area (NE Ohio)? I know I could try the Yellow Pages, but that's sort of like throwing a dart at a map.

There are several professional associations that watchmakers may belong to, and picking a member of one or more of those would be a good first step:

AWI (American Watchmaker's-Clockmaker's Institute)

American Watch Guild
post #7 of 15
Very simple adjustments. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REGULATE IT YOURSELF! Bad, bad idea. If it's new, take it back to where you bought it, they may do it for free, or fairly cheaply.

If not, find a reputable watchmaker in your area and have them do it. As I said, it should be a fairly simple thing for a trained watchmaker to do.

You are neither trained, nor do you have the right tools to do this. Don't even try it on a watch you care about.

JMHO.
post #8 of 15
With a Seiko, you are better off sending it back to the manufacturer for repair. Seiko movements are not quite as straightforward as classic manual and automatic movements. As a result, many highly skilled watchmakers will shy away from them because of this. I think Seiko has a service center on both coasts. AT the very least, they can probably give you an estimate.
post #9 of 15
Before you send it in for service you might want to try a few things.

First, wear the watch for a month or so. The movement should break-in and accuracy improve.

Secondly, since the watch is running slow, it might not have enough power. Try winding the watch by hand for a few days. It will add some wear to the crown to wind it but otherwise doesn't hurt an automatic to wind by hand. If this helps, you'll know you aren't active enough to keep the watch fully wound. (This is a common problem for people who work in offices.)

Thirdly, watches run slower or faster in different positions. Try changing the position of the watch when you take it off for the night. For example, leave it crown down for a few days, then crown up for a few day, then flat on its back for a few days, etc. You don't have to go through the whole cycle. When you find a position that works for you, just adopt it.

Also, for a mechanical watch to be a COSC certified chronometer it must not lose more than 4 nor gain more than 6 seconds per day. Most watches are not certified. Some are not certified because of the certification cost but most watches can't meet the accuracy requirement. Since your watch will never be bang on, you should consider how much time and money you want to spend chasing a few seconds a day.

You didn't mention the specific watch so this advice is fairly general.
post #10 of 15
I agree with the last post. The fact is that If it is not a certified crono, 30 seconds a day is not a big deal.
post #11 of 15
I agree with an earlier post. At night try letting it sit in different positions . MY JLC will lose or gain noticebly in different positions. Also there is a breaking in period.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVS View Post
Also, for a mechanical watch to be a COSC certified chronometer it must not lose more than 4 nor gain more than 6 seconds per day. Most watches are not certified. Some are not certified because of the certification cost but most watches can't meet the accuracy requirement. Since your watch will never be bang on, you should consider how much time and money you want to spend chasing a few seconds a day.

You didn't mention the specific watch so this advice is fairly general.

He did, and it's a Seiko. Seiko is among the few brands that peruse their own chronometer standards instead of submitting movement to COSC. That includes Grand Seiko as well.


Even though 7S26 is now used mostly in entry level Seiko automatics, the workhorse movement should do a lot better than gaining/losing 30 seconds a day.
post #13 of 15

any decent jeweler watchmaker should charge no more than £15 but try self adjust first make sure its fully wound and leave dial up overnight by your bedside

post #14 of 15

If the watch looses 30 seconds a day on your wrist, then there is something wrong.

post #15 of 15
Seikos never lose time.
Must be a counterfeit.
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