or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Things you just don't get
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Things you just don't get - Page 338

post #5056 of 13316
Surprised it wasn't "Liquor Supplies Low."
post #5057 of 13316
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

So my jag-you-are has one of those alert centers that displays various messages like "low windshield fluid" or as in the case below, "low outside temperature." Last night I had a dream that I was driving and the alert center came on and read "Avocado supplies depleted." And it's strange, because it's true that I don't have any avocados at home or in the car. Even stranger is that I got out of the car and checked in the upper right hand corner of the trunk where the avocados are normally located and there weren't any there. Now, keep in mind that there isn't any actual avocado supply depot in my car. But I was sure there was one last night.



Fucking weird.

Was my girlfriend using the avocados in her hair? That's what she does with mine...
post #5058 of 13316
Tennis players that make silly noises... like "HOOOOO!" every time they swing their rackets.

Why chicken flavour instant noodle smells just like Araldite?
Edited by MikeDT - 1/26/13 at 5:50am
post #5059 of 13316
Why normal adults act like retards around kids
post #5060 of 13316
Why people always say, after winning something, that it's "humbling."

At some level, I suppose I kind of understand how if you win Wimbledon once and you're now in the company of all the greats who won Wimbledon, maybe it's kind of humbling. But even then, it's a shitload more humbling to be the guy you just beat.

What really triggered this was Shaun White saying it's humbling to have won six X Games golds in superpipe or whatever they call it. How is that humbling at all? You're the winningest guy, like, probably ever in this crap. There's no humility to be found in winning it again. Do you know what the word means, or are you just saying it because that's what you heard some Wimbledon champ say?

Oh, and since we're on the topic.......

X Games.
post #5061 of 13316
That is a very perceptive comment. You should be humbled to have thought of it.
post #5062 of 13316
In the paper today, there’s a picture of Tessa Jowell, receiving her damehood at Buckingham Palace. She looks very nice in a smart red coat and hat, holding up the medal in a silk-lined box, family around in morning suits, camera bulbs flashing. Dame Tessa says: “This is so overwhelming, it’s a most extraordinary honour and I feel really humbled by it.”

It reminds me of the Oscars last year, where Gary Oldman was nominated and said this was “extremely humbling.”

Kevin Pietersen said it was “humbling” when he got a standing ovation for scoring a century.

THAT’S NOT HUMBLING.

NONE OF THIS IS HUMBLING.

THIS IS ALL THE OPPOSITE OF HUMBLING.

It’s an infuriating trend, which is only going to get worse; award winners will soon be saying they feel “humbled by the experience” as often as they salute their fellow nominees or thank their agents. But being HUMBLE is to have a LOW ESTIMATE OF ONE’S IMPORTANCE. Being humbled by someone else means: SOMEONE ELSE LOWERING YOUR ESTIMATE OF YOUR OWN IMPORTANCE. It would be humbling to score 0 at the cricket. To be overlooked for awards. To be ignored in the street by an old friend. To have your trousers fall down on the bus. And various other things that you don’t get a round of applause for. (Though I think I might definitely give someone a round of applause if their trousers fell down on the bus). (Not flashers).

There is a sub-meaning of the verb “to humble” which means “to lower someone’s rank or status”, eg, to take someone’s knighthood away - like, you know, as in, LITERALLY THE OPPOSITE OF BEING MADE A DAME.

Being feted, applauded, honoured, awarded… these things make people feel proud and puffed up! Fair enough. Good luck to them. Nothing wrong with feeling proud of yourself. But they need to stop saying it makes them feel humble. That translates, I think, as: “Today I feel like a big fat royal genius, all amazing and special and better than everyone, but I can simultaneously dispel the jealousy that all the lesser people must inevitably feel, by saying it has brought on a bout of tremendous worthlessness and low self-esteem. Then they will also love me, as well as being obliged to bow and call me Your Grace.”

Well, it’s stupid. Stop doing it everyone. Or keep doing it, for the language must live and change, mustn’t it? And soon the dictionary can carry two meanings of the word “humble”: (1) modest, unpretentious, lowly or abased, (2) feeling like a big shiny great lord of the universe because you just won a thing and everyone’s clapping.
post #5063 of 13316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post

In the paper today, there’s a picture of Tessa Jowell, receiving her damehood at Buckingham Palace. She looks very nice in a smart red coat and hat, holding up the medal in a silk-lined box, family around in morning suits, camera bulbs flashing. Dame Tessa says: “This is so overwhelming, it’s a most extraordinary honour and I feel really humbled by it.”

It reminds me of the Oscars last year, where Gary Oldman was nominated and said this was “extremely humbling.”

Kevin Pietersen said it was “humbling” when he got a standing ovation for scoring a century.

THAT’S NOT HUMBLING.

NONE OF THIS IS HUMBLING.

THIS IS ALL THE OPPOSITE OF HUMBLING.

It’s an infuriating trend, which is only going to get worse; award winners will soon be saying they feel “humbled by the experience” as often as they salute their fellow nominees or thank their agents. But being HUMBLE is to have a LOW ESTIMATE OF ONE’S IMPORTANCE. Being humbled by someone else means: SOMEONE ELSE LOWERING YOUR ESTIMATE OF YOUR OWN IMPORTANCE. It would be humbling to score 0 at the cricket. To be overlooked for awards. To be ignored in the street by an old friend. To have your trousers fall down on the bus. And various other things that you don’t get a round of applause for. (Though I think I might definitely give someone a round of applause if their trousers fell down on the bus). (Not flashers).

There is a sub-meaning of the verb “to humble” which means “to lower someone’s rank or status”, eg, to take someone’s knighthood away - like, you know, as in, LITERALLY THE OPPOSITE OF BEING MADE A DAME.

Being feted, applauded, honoured, awarded… these things make people feel proud and puffed up! Fair enough. Good luck to them. Nothing wrong with feeling proud of yourself. But they need to stop saying it makes them feel humble. That translates, I think, as: “Today I feel like a big fat royal genius, all amazing and special and better than everyone, but I can simultaneously dispel the jealousy that all the lesser people must inevitably feel, by saying it has brought on a bout of tremendous worthlessness and low self-esteem. Then they will also love me, as well as being obliged to bow and call me Your Grace.”

Well, it’s stupid. Stop doing it everyone. Or keep doing it, for the language must live and change, mustn’t it? And soon the dictionary can carry two meanings of the word “humble”: (1) modest, unpretentious, lowly or abased, (2) feeling like a big shiny great lord of the universe because you just won a thing and everyone’s clapping.


nod[1].gif
post #5064 of 13316
Joseph A. Bank stocks are down over 17% today. Did we maybe have something to do with that?
post #5065 of 13316
When sports and entertainment figures say something is "humbling" it means their publicist has determined there is an issue with the public persona and this is designed to address that.
post #5066 of 13316
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Joseph A. Bank stocks are down over 17% today. Did we maybe have something to do with that?
confused.gif

Do you mean JaB stock is down, like in a Dow Jones kinda way, or the JaB stocks are down, as in people are really taking advantage of the 3-for-1 sale? I suppose SF's effect on either is possible...
post #5067 of 13316
Jos. A Bank is so great because you can buy one suit, and then they just give you two more and you don't have to pay for them, just for the one. Of course the three suits together aren't worth the price you pay for one, but that is just nitpicking.
post #5068 of 13316
Quote:
Originally Posted by L'Incandescent View Post

Jos. A Bank is so great because you can buy one suit, and then they just give you two more and you don't have to pay for them, just for the one. Of course the three suits together aren't worth the price you pay for one, but that is just nitpicking.

They're like the BMG music club of men's clothing.
post #5069 of 13316
my freshman year roomie was a preppie kid form bal'mor whose shirts were all from jab - i had never heard of thestore before think it was a very different company back then (late 70s) as the shirts seemed indistuinguisable (mabe even a little better?) than brooks bros
post #5070 of 13316
Call me crazy, but I have much less hate for JAB than most on here.

Their stuff is actually not that horrible, is of higher quality than other mass-marketed tailored men's clothing where ppl would normally go for that sort of thing (e.g. Men's Wearhouse), remains relatively true to the more classic tenets of men's clothing (meaning not getting as trendy as some others), and provides generally solid value for the average, non-SF suit wearer. For my friends who want an interview and wedding suit that's not going to fall apart and might have them looking relatively decent and don't care about the SF minutiae, JAB is actually a pretty solid recommendation. Of all the MC mass-marketers, JAB is probably the most SF compliant.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Things you just don't get