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Things you just don't get - Page 329

post #4921 of 14576


separate hot and cold faucets in a sink/bathtub. ffffuuuu.gif
post #4922 of 14576
I could understand it in a bathtub (well not really understand, but could deal with)

But I don't get it when they use them in sinks.
post #4923 of 14576
Seems like you'd get scaldingly hot water out of the hot tap.
post #4924 of 14576
Or 32.1 degree water. Take your pick.
post #4925 of 14576
I can remember a bathroom sink having a mixed faucet was pretty impressive to me. All the old houses I grew up in had the separate faucets.
post #4926 of 14576
I have a couple of theories about the 2-faucet thing. Neither of which apply to modern times.

1. When indoor plumbing first came along people were not used to the concept of running water/wasting water. They filled a basing for their toilet needs, and the faucets arent a hinderance to that.

That still wouldnt explain they chose to install 2 peice of hardware. So here's a better guess:

2. Hot water heaters in those days didnt use a pump. Ive seen shots of turn-of-the-century houses where the water heater was in the attic and operated by gravity. This would produce much less pressure than the main water line, so a convenient way to get around balancing that pressure to get enough hot water is 2 faucets.

Any plumbers on board have a real explanation?
post #4927 of 14576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

2. Hot water heaters in those days didnt use a pump. Ive seen shots of turn-of-the-century houses where the water heater was in the attic and operated by gravity. This would produce much less pressure than the main water line, so a convenient way to get around balancing that pressure to get enough hot water is 2 faucets.
Any plumbers on board have a real explanation?

I am an amateur plumber but I believe this explanation is accurate. Many times in ye oldern days the cold and the hot water had different pressure. It stuck around because that's what many people's old sinks had installed so you couldn't replace just the faucet you would have to replace the whole sink.

Also we had one of these in the house I lived in during elementary school.

post #4928 of 14576
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Or 32.1 degree water. Take your pick.

32.1 degrees, just under body temp.
post #4929 of 14576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

32.1 degrees, just under body temp.

I am very happy it's not my body that is 32.1 degrees. Brrrr.
post #4930 of 14576
Neat. I learned something today!
post #4931 of 14576
NYE
post #4932 of 14576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

32.1 degrees, just under body temp.

32.1ºC as a body temp? you're well into hypothermia and probably already calculating time of death if a pathologist/detective/CSI guy.
post #4933 of 14576

32.1 C = 89.78 F

post #4934 of 14576

Damn you metric system, why must you make so much sense?!

post #4935 of 14576
But most hot water heaters now still don't use a pump right? It's just water pressure from the input pushing the hot water out?

I've certainly never heard a pump kick in.
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