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Things you just don't get - Page 1525

post #22861 of 24135
Quote:
Originally Posted by ASNY2VA View Post

How do you say ain't no two ways about it in Latin?

Definitely "Onay wotay aysway outbay tiay," no two ways bout it.
post #22862 of 24135

why does the internet want so badly for me to read about Barney Fife's last words?

post #22863 of 24135
I was petting Diderik (my keetay) this morning he was purring up a storm of happy when out of nowhere he uses his paw to swat at my hand.

Me: Why did you swat at me Diderik you was all happy?
Diderik: I am a man of action don't take no bullshit!
Me: But there was no bullshit for you to take.
Diderik: Uhh, mmm, you know I must of processed the information in a manner of wrong on reflection now there wasn't no bullshit at all hehehe!
post #22864 of 24135
Why is it such a thing that almost everyone writing an opinion piece, a short analytical (marketing) piece for a professional journal, a blog entry, or some other relatively informal written work feels compelled to begin it with an anecdote or fictional set piece that supposedly "sets up" or "leads into" the real discussion? It's actually a difficult technique to execute well, and more often than not as a reader my eyes glaze over and I abandon the piece at the second or third convoluted sentence of the awkward, contrived framing device -- whereas if the writer had just said "hey, let me tell you something about widgets . . ." I might have skimmed through the entire piece.
Edited by lawyerdad - 8/4/16 at 2:07pm
post #22865 of 24135
I agree completely with this. When I teach my students to write, I always tell them to jump right into the content. Of course I'm teaching them to write philosophy papers, which are different from other forms. But still, those set-ups are tedious and annoying.
post #22866 of 24135
Quote:
Originally Posted by L'Incandescent View Post

I agree completely with this. When I teach my students to write, I always tell them to jump right into the content. Of course I'm teaching them to write philosophy papers, which are different from other forms. But still, those set-ups are tedious and annoying.

There's a lawyer/law teacher/writer named Jim McElheny who for years wrote a famous (in a big fish, small pond kind of way) column on the rules governing courtroom evidence, which is a relatively hidebound and persnickety area of law. He employed a variant of this technique, although he'd sustain the fictional construct through the entire piece. It worked well, both because of his skill as a writer and (I believe) because the subject matter and didactic intent of the articles lent themselves to it well.

Unfortunately, though, generations of lawyers and law students who read McElheny's columns thought to themselves, "Wow, that's great. I should start writing like that, too!"

It's a bit like watching Olympic ski jumpers and deciding, "Cool, I'm going to go do that this weekend!" (Yes, I recently watched the Eddie the Eagle movie.) Except in this case the pain associated with lack of skill and poor technique is externalized to the readership.
post #22867 of 24135
A lot of the articles in Aeon magazine are like that. I think the quality of that site has gone down quite a bit, ever since they started including short films and short opinion pieces in addition to the longer essays. Still, it has some of the best essays I've read on the internet.
post #22868 of 24135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Pun View Post

A lot of the articles in Aeon magazine are like that. I think the quality of that site has gone down quite a bit, ever since they started including short films and short opinion pieces in addition to the longer essays. Still, it has some of the best essays I've read on the internet.

I'm too lazy to really think this through, but I'm going to suggest on the basis of what I "feel" that this phenomenon is not unrelated to the increasingly prevalent belief that "Hey, that's just my opinion, which I'm entitled to just like everyone else!" is a cogent response to criticism of one's reasoning or the reliability of one's premises.
post #22869 of 24135
I learned claim-data-warrant in hs and realized the power of getting to the point early on. I like to punch my reader in the face with the conclusion and spend the rest of my space on evidence and justification.

I think with persuasive writing narrative generally amounts to a waste of words.
post #22870 of 24135
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

Why is it such a thing that almost everyone writing an opinion piece, a short analytical (marketing) piece for a professional journal, a blog entry, or some other relatively informal written work feels compelled to begin it with an anecdote or fictional set piece that supposedly "sets up" or "leads into" the real discussion? It's actually a difficult technique to execute well, and more often than not as a reader my eyes glaze over and I abandon the piece at the second or third convoluted sentence of the awkward, contrived framing device -- whereas if the writer had just said "hey, let me tell you something about widgets . . ." I might have skimmed through the entire piece.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

There's a lawyer/law teacher/writer named Jim McElheny who for years wrote a famous (in a big fish, small pond kind of way) column on the rules governing courtroom evidence, which is a relatively hidebound and persnickety area of law. He employed a variant of this technique, although he'd sustain the fictional construct through the entire piece. It worked well, both because of his skill as a writer and (I believe) because the subject matter and didactic intent of the articles lent themselves to it well.

Unfortunately, though, generations of lawyers and law students who read McElheny's columns thought to themselves, "Wow, that's great. I should start writing like that, too!"

It's a bit like watching Olympic ski jumpers and deciding, "Cool, I'm going to go do that this weekend!" (Yes, I recently watched the Eddie the Eagle movie.) Except in this case the pain associated with lack of skill and poor technique is externalized to the readership.
It's awesome how you complained about this writing trick, only to use it on your next post to further complain about it. True next level stuff biggrin.gif
post #22871 of 24135
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post


It's awesome how you complained about this writing trick, only to use it on your next post to further complain about it. True next level stuff biggrin.gif

It's a Philosophy thing. You wouldn't understand.
post #22872 of 24135
And why does Amazon consider Don Quixote to be "Classic American Literature"?
post #22873 of 24135

post #22874 of 24135
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

"Hey, that's just my opinion, which I'm entitled to just like everyone else!" is a cogent response to criticism of one's reasoning or the reliability of one's premises.

:brick: :brick: :brick:

post #22875 of 24135
The thing is, why go through the cumbersome process of reasoning in the first place if the result of said reasoning has no more or less value than any other notions that get into the mente? Why not form opinions via coin flip or something?
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