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Things you just don't get - Page 1339

post #20071 of 24149
Yup. Pension is job/company specific.
post #20072 of 24149
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Pensions are held and managed much differently than they used to be pre 2007. Stuff like Enron etc where people lose pensions because it was held in Enron stock can't happen anymore.

And you say 'underpaid' in the current sense. Are you counting the income they would receive after they retire?

I am referring to it in the current sense because I don't know the details of their pensions, which are complicated by a handful of variables.
post #20073 of 24149
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Pensions are held and managed much differently than they used to be pre 2007. Stuff like Enron etc where people lose pensions because it was held in Enron stock can't happen anymore.

2007...

Enron...

Pensions...

Your grasp on the subject seems weak.

-Enron blew up in 2001
-Enron employees mostly blew themselves up via 401K investments
-There is in many cases nothing to stop people from putting 100% of 401K investments in company stock, beyond a disclaimer
-Pensions are often/typically only partially guaranteed/insured. Bankruptcy of the funding company will negatively impact pensions.
post #20074 of 24149
post #20075 of 24149
Also, I said 'stuff like Enron etc', Enron was simply an example of a company who did was I explained. I never once stated that Enron happened in 2007, I used that date as other companies with similar plans also went down at around that time. I also never said that workers didn't lose money in their 401k's - it was irrelevant as the topic was pensions, not 401k's.

God you're arrogant.
Edited by venividivicibj - 10/14/15 at 12:06pm
post #20076 of 24149
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Control of Multiemployer Plans

Most plans are jointly administered and governed by a board of trustees, with labor and management equally represented.

  • Management trustees — the contributing employers or an association to which they belong typically determine how the management trustees will be selected.
  • Labor trustees — the union typically determines how the labor trustees are selected.

A trustee is required to act in the sole and exclusive interest of the plan and its participants, regardless of who elects or appoints the trustee.

The board of trustees normally makes decisions about the plan’s benefit structure. The bargaining parties negotiate a contribution rate and the trustees translate that rate into a benefit. Decisions to increase benefits or change the plan are also typically made by the board of trustees. In some industries (especially mining and segments of trucking), employers and unions fix the benefit levels through collective bargaining.

The costs of administering a plan are generally paid from plan assets.

Top

Plan Benefit Structures

Multiemployer plans are subject to many of the vesting, accrual, and minimum participation rules that apply to single-employer plans. However, there are differences in plan design. Many multiemployer plans are "unit benefit" plans that offer a specified dollar-amount benefit per month multiplied by years of credited service. Some plans offer a choice of enhanced benefits to employees whose employers agree to pay higher contributions.

In addition, multiemployer plans offer portability — participants retain service if they switch employment from one contributing employer to another within the same plan. Further, many plans in the same industry (for example, trucking) offer reciprocity whereby an employee who moves from one geographic area to another can transfer credit between plans.

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Employer Contributions

In multiemployer plans, the amount of the employer's contribution is usually set by a collective bargaining agreement that specifies a contribution formula (such as $3 per hour worked by each employee covered by the agreement) and further provides that contributions must be paid to the plan on a monthly basis.

If an employer is delinquent, ERISA Sec. 502(g) permits the plan to sue and obtain the delinquency plus interest, liquidated damages, court costs, and reasonable attorney fees. This is a major difference between single and multiemployer plans.

Top

 

^Investment Decisions

ERISA has one set of investment rules that generally apply to all defined benefit plans. Plan assets must be invested prudently and solely in the interests of participants.

post #20077 of 24149
When I was 12 (just one year older than Diderik man time flies) I thought "Just Another Night" by Mick Jagger was the coolest song I even had a tape of the album it was on. (I had a craving to hear it today so I listened to it again.) It's weird how I still love almost all the songs I loved as a child. ("The Long Run" by the Eagles is a exception I loved that in 1979 don't really want to hear it no more.)
post #20078 of 24149

There is song of popular on the radio called "Exes and Ohs" and it is about a succubus woman who is irresistible to men and then she leaves them and they whine at her. 

 

Well, I han gotten curious and looked up who this vixen is and this is what she looks like:

 


I think this song is not truthful. 

post #20079 of 24149
♪♪♫~~~♪ I might like you better if we slept together ♫~~♪♪♫


post #20080 of 24149
I don't get why the umps didn't throw the flag on Joey Bats' home run should of been Unsportsmanlike Conduct call it back.
post #20081 of 24149
So back in the decades when men (and women for that matter) regularly wore hats as part of their professional, semi-formal, and formal attire, did everyone just have hat head once they were indoors?

I ask because I bought a hat that I actually like (my oversized round Asian face generally looks awful in hats). But now I find myself deciding whether I'm just going to keep it on all day if I wear it. Because my oversized round Asian face looks ridiculous with hat head.
post #20082 of 24149
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

So back in the decades when men (and women for that matter) regularly wore hats as part of their professional, semi-formal, and formal attire, did everyone just have hat head once they were indoors?

I ask because I bought a hat that I actually like (my oversized round Asian face generally looks awful in hats). But now I find myself deciding whether I'm just going to keep it on all day if I wear it. Because my oversized round Asian face looks ridiculous with hat head.

This is something I have pondered more than once and for these very same reasons. I wonder if that's why they all had their hair greased up?
post #20083 of 24149
^ wouldn't that make it worse--flattened and greasy?
post #20084 of 24149
Not sure...just spit balling here.
post #20085 of 24149
I don't know that classic hats caused as much hat hair as something like a baseball cap or winter hat that actually contacts the top of your head.

If it only really grabs in a ring around your head above your ears, and everybody wore short hair, I can see how hat hair would be avoidable.
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