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Things you just don't get - Page 834

post #12496 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by razl View Post

I've ridden 90% street for 15+ years (probably 50/50 street/trail for the ten years prior) and have always had a mountain bike. My routes are partial cobblestone and even the areas that are paved aren't in super great shape. Conversely, I wonder how those guys with those delicate looking race bikes + tires manage with all the potholes, rubble, and debris strewn about.

ps - in recent years I've gravitated to a Trek hybrid; a newer niche market that spans what I need - a rugged'ized street'able bike that I can reasonably take on the non-hardcore trails with just a tire swap.

Sure, there are plenty of people who justifiably have mountain bikes. But if you're riding nearly exclusively on asphalt/concrete/smooth dirt and you have 38+mm tires with huge knobby tread, you're working way harder than you need to. Even moreso all these bikes with suspensions. Unless you're going off jumps and over roots, you don't need a suspension.

Not so many cobblestone streets in the US.

I've got a road-style hybrid for road/dirt trail riding. Doesn't hold up to road bikes on the road but damn does it murder mountain bikes on the smoother trails. I've only been biking a year and I'm already lusting after a real road bike. And I'm way too big to be a real road biker. Not many powerlifter/bicyclists.
post #12497 of 15049
Don't forget, there are many pro races where they *hammer* those road bikes over cobblestone streets at high speed.

With the growing popularity of both cyclocross and long gravel races in the US, there are starting to be a lot more options for bikes that fit larger tires. You can still build a pretty light wheel with 32 spokes that will be very strong...add in some thicker tires, and you will have bombproof ride. The frame and the rest of the parts are plenty strong.

I've even taken my CX bike to the MTB trails. It isn't perfect, you have to compromise a bit on air pressure--34c tires will bottom out at low pressure so you can't drop them as much for extra traction and bump absorption--and without any suspension, the thin tires can get a little bumpy, but its not like I am worried about breaking the bike.
post #12498 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Those road bikes aren't as delicate as you think...

Wow, you just shattered my misconceptions. Good info, thanks for sharing - I learn something new everyday!

Quick q - is that comparable to most of the high-end "race" hardware or is that a specialized "ruggedized" variety? If that's the caliber of stuff across the board, I might just investigate it on my next revamp. I've never even considered it since I've always had a "it's too fragile for what I do" mentality.
post #12499 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

Sure, there are plenty of people who justifiably have mountain bikes. But if you're riding nearly exclusively on asphalt/concrete/smooth dirt and you have 38+mm tires with huge knobby tread, you're working way harder than you need to.

As an aside, I've heard some people claim that they want that additional resistance as part of their workout. Personally, I think they're wasting their tires tires since I suspect they wear faster (I bet a lot faster) on asphalt.

I'd also say that my hybrid has front suspension and I get the point about it costing me effort, but it's worth it for the roads (lots of cobblestone) that I bike on. If it was more smooth pavement I'd ride a solid.

But I'm quibbling, you're over the target with your points.
post #12500 of 15049
People that want "extra resistance" and all that puzzle me just like those folks that strain along, using very bad form with their pedaling, in a gear obviously far too large. Cycling is about proper gearing, smooth pedaling, and cadence.
post #12501 of 15049
Since we're talking bikes I'll share a quick story...

My girlfriend is in insurance defense and had a case recently where an avid race biker came upon a freshly laid asphalt patch that still had a construction crew present; you know, the guy with the sign that says stop/slow. The asphalt patch was one lane and traffic from both directions was being routed on the other, old lane.

The sign person had "slow" facing the rider and he should have went down the traffic lane with traffic but, instead, he saw that flat freshly laid asphalt and thought "it's like glass, I can haul ass on it!" (remember I said lots of our local streets are rough? well he got his eyes on a fresh smooth one and...) . He got cranked up and aimed for it full speed.

Unfortunately, he didn't see the lip between the road and the fresh surface and wrecked - over the handlebars, feet didn't unclip, tangled in the bike, hit and slid on the asphalt (oh, did I mention it was -freshly-laid- and still hot and soft????). Road rash on regular pavement is bad enough, on hot fresh, soft, asphalt that breaks apart and sticks in your flesh - much worse. He's totally f*cked from injuries. His bike was approx $8k'ish (?) and totaled.

Back to the insurance defense - she's representing the construction company who was following standard normal procedures but there's some edge-case points where the rider might still get some % of his damages/injuries covered even though he totally disregarded the instructions, warnings, etc. Cest la vie!
post #12502 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post


Not so many cobblestone streets in the US.
In much of L.A. reasonably maintained cobblestone streets would be an improvement on the crater-pocked obstacle courses bikers have to navigate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

People that want "extra resistance" and all that puzzle me just like those folks that strain along, using very bad form with their pedaling, in a gear obviously far too large. Cycling is about proper gearing, smooth pedaling, and cadence.
Agreed. Why not just drag an anchor or giant kite behind you?
post #12503 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by razl View Post

Wow, you just shattered my misconceptions. Good info, thanks for sharing - I learn something new everyday!

Quick q - is that comparable to most of the high-end "race" hardware or is that a specialized "ruggedized" variety? If that's the caliber of stuff across the board, I might just investigate it on my next revamp. I've never even considered it since I've always had a "it's too fragile for what I do" mentality.

Alright, so that video is a bit extreme. For anybody besides a 120lbs rider, I would start to be concerned with the wheels. Anything like a low-spoke-count carbon rim is not meant to drop off cliffs. Something with a few more spokes is going to be way sturdier.
Things like carbon handlebars can snap...but the same is true of carbon mountain bike bars. In fact, a lot of high end MTB hardware is not particularly sturdy...it is designed to be stiff and light. If you are a pro racer and have a nasty crash, you are probably going to break things...but that's ok because your sponsors will hand you new carbon bits. Basically except for frame+fork (which are are strong usually), if it is carbon, it is made for light weight and stiffness, not durability...

There are some really good carbon repair companies these days though...if you crack a frame, comebody like Rukus ( http://www.ruckuscomp.com/services/repair/ ) can fix it right up, good as new.
post #12504 of 15049
I'm reasonably good at social interaction, but that doesn't mean I know how to deal with every situation that arises. Today I was walking on campus with two other people, one of whom said "the sky is very blue today." Now he was right, the sky was unusually blue. But I was at a loss for how to follow up on that. What do you say? "Yup, got a real blueness to it today hehehe." That doesn't seem right.
post #12505 of 15049
You need lessons there Links, the correct response to that is clearly to argue that the sky isn't as blue as some other time in your life when you saw it and that person wasn't present to enjoy it.
post #12506 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

And I'm way too big to be a real road biker. Not many powerlifter/bicyclists.

dude, if Bo rides....


post #12507 of 15049
Frank Zane was a multiple winner of Mr. Universe, Mr. America, and 3 times Mr. Olympia and also an avid cyclist. When I was into cycling I was a very lean 195 lbs @ 5'11". People would pay to suck my wheel on the flats as I made such a good wind block.

Edit: Here's Frank in a recent photo at 70:

post #12508 of 15049
Can't tell if reference to cycling steroids or not.
post #12509 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by razl View Post

As an aside, I've heard some people claim that they want that additional resistance as part of their workout. Personally, I think they're wasting their tires tires since I suspect they wear faster (I bet a lot faster) on asphalt.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

People that want "extra resistance" and all that puzzle me just like those folks that strain along, using very bad form with their pedaling, in a gear obviously far too large. Cycling is about proper gearing, smooth pedaling, and cadence.

I'd rather ride farther and faster to burn my extra calories. I guess it might make sense if you had a fixed distance, like a commute, and wanted to maximize calories consumed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Frank Zane was a multiple winner of Mr. Universe, Mr. America, and 3 times Mr. Olympia and also an avid cyclist. When I was into cycling I was a very lean 195 lbs @ 5'11". People would pay to suck my wheel on the flats as I made such a good wind block.

I'd probably look like Zane if I cut down to 195 lbs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

dude, if Bo rides....

Bo knows bicycling.


I'd consider myself fortunate to be 1/500th the athlete that Bo is, even with the new hip.
post #12510 of 15049
Quote:
Originally Posted by L'Incandescent View Post

"the sky is very blue today." Now he was right, the sky was unusually blue. But I was at a loss for how to follow up on that. What do you say? "Yup, got a real blueness to it today hehehe." That doesn't seem right.

How about, "Yes, it is very blue, but not as blue as my balls after an unsuccessful Hucklebuck." After all, you do have tenure. You can pretty much say whatever you want (be less inhibited vocally).
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