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Motorcycles - Page 226

post #3376 of 4600
Ooooooooooooo you cant go wrong with the GT1000.... one of my dream bikes is a Paul Smart

What track was that???/
post #3377 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Ooooooooooooo you cant go wrong with the GT1000.... one of my dream bikes is a Paul Smart

What track was that???/
It's a Sport 1000, not a GT, but more or less the same. Unfortunately for my bank account it's got way too many zeroes spent on it and I haven't even ridden it in over a year. The Harley is too fun around Brooklyn, and I don't do stupid things like wheelies on the Williamsburg bridge with it.

That was on Thunderbolt at NJMP.
post #3378 of 4600
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

Like you did?

While you keep claiming your first bike was a great choice, every experience you've related indicates it wasn't. Despite completing your training courses and getting your license, which indicates you had sufficient training for riding a motorcycle on public roads

I did ride on public roads in addition to parking lots. Safely and comfortably...
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

, you were unsure of your ability to handle it on the road and so tooled around parking lots for two months

Riding in a parking lot and getting used to a new bike is called practice (and I just didn't "tool around parking lots for two months") which I still did even after several years of riding a motorcycle. I knew what I could do and what I couldn't do. I practiced what I couldn't do or wasn't good at and got better at it with a bike that fit me perfectly. I'm not sure why that's so hard for you and to understand. You'll do the same thing when you get a bike and start riding (or get a new bike after years of experience).
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

, and you dropped it repeatedly during low-speed maneuvers.

Lol! While I dropped my bike once or twice practicing low speed maneuvers (which is to be expected), I practiced picking my bike up often to make sure that I knew exactly what I was doing in case I ever laid my bike down on the street - which is what I was referring to in the post that you didn't quote.

That's different than "dropping it repeatedly during low speed maneuvers" "for two months while tooling around parking lots" "with a bike that you couldn't ride" because if you would have bought a ninja 250 none of this would have happened, etc. etc. etc. Also, that's what practice if for whether you have 1 year or 100 years of riding.

Plus, there are only two types of riders: Riders that have dropped their bikes and riders that haven't dropped their bikes... Yet...
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

This is not normal behavior.

Practicing picking up a new bike is completely normal behavior and as I said, I suggest you do it several times from both sides so you know how to do it. Dropping it will happen to, if you're actually practicing anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

Those are the symptoms of a new rider with too much bike.

It's a symptom of any rider with any bike.

It appears that you're suggesting that you don't do these things when you get a new bike? I'll strongly suggest that you do. Did I lack experience with my bike? Sure. Even after several years there is much to learn about riding a bike. Does that mean that I shouldn't have bought the bike I did? Absolutely and obviously not. When you get a bike, whatever bike you get (whether you have a lot of experience or a little) you will take the time to get used to it, learn the controls, test the brakes, see how it handles, etc., etc., etc. I did it on my bike successfully just like you will when you get a bike and just like everyone else does who gets one. None of this has anything to do with the bike that I got being "too much bike". It was perfect for me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

You previously wrote:
The reason I said that was ironic before is that you're clearly just like the person you describe. You ignored everyone's advice,

I followed my mentor's / instructors advice actually. I wasn't peer pressured into anything. And as I said, I rode my bike for my advanced training classes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

bought too much bike and spent months tip-toeing around parking lots (also driving late at night/early morning with no cars around, I'll bet),

Why would a person that just got a bike ride in major traffic whether they have 1 or 100 years of experience of riding?

Whether one has experience and a new bike or your a new rider that has a 250, 650, 750 it takes time to acclimate to the bike. You're reasoning is absurd! Having "too much bike" and buying a bike that you're acclimating yourself to are two different things. Can't you understand that distinction?
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

and you're so arrogant you can't even consider the possibility you were mistaken,

I'm so confident that it was such a great bike that I'd do it all over again. I loved every second of it and had a great time when I had that bike. I wasn't "terrified" of my bike or "terrified" riding on the road (as someone posted), I knew my limitations, had a bike that I felt comfortable on, wasn't afraid to learn on, wasn't afraid to drop, completely respected it's speed and power, etc. It simply wasn't "too much bike" for me. YMMV

Just like the next time I get a bike; I'll shop around endlessly, make sure the price fits my budget, make sure it has what I want, make sure the bike fits me, has the appropriate power, etc. and then I'll ride safely and within my experience. I'll go to a parking lot when there are no cars and practice, ride on the streets when there / where there aren't many cars, probably drop the bike, practice picking the bike up several times, take more courses, slow speed drills, etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

even when everyone disagrees with you.

You mean the one without a bike, the other one with no formal training, and one that can't handle his 600 because it's "too much bike"? ffffuuuu.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

Think about that: you're saying everyone else is wrong.

No, I'm saying that people should get a bike that fits them even if it's larger than a 750 (like a Sportster or a VTX or whatever).

You and your bro's have read waaaaaaayyyyyyy to much into my statements and think I said not to get any formal training, buy a Hayabusa, and ride outside of your experience because your daddy thinks you're a pussy. Why? Because you can't comprehend.
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

That's pretty much the defining characteristic of arrogance.

Nope. You're lack of comprehension isn't my arrogance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

You can try to rationalize it by claiming you know yourself better than we'll ever know you,

Which I do, that's not rationalizing...
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

we weren't there, etc.,

You weren't. My instructors were though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post

but the other side of that is all we know is what you, your most biased and invested advocate, have told us, and you still come off as being in the wrong. We universally think you're wrong when we likely don't even know the most egregious blunders you made.

How dramatic. I don't have anything to hide. You, however, have a lot to comprehend.
Edited by Tck13 - 8/17/13 at 7:47pm
post #3379 of 4600
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SplasH View Post

Just to be clear, getting a French license is 20 hours of driving lessons on the bike, close track and open road. I had to do it twice, one with a 125cc and one with a 500cc because it's two different licenses.

Aside of that one of my best friend and coach rode in the world endurance championship and finished 4th at Le Mans last year and i've been taking one riding course every year or so for the fast 6-7 years... I could recommend you a good french course, i'm just not really aware of all the kind of courses that goes around the world. Sorry.

So yeah, I'm quite confident entering this pissing contest...

Back to the main topic, that last ducati looks amazing. Is that a 1000GT ?

Than I was wrong and I apologize for the comments about not taking any courses (I wasn't sure about France...). I think that European riders are MUCH better educated and trained than American riders.
post #3380 of 4600
facepalm.gif
post #3381 of 4600
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Doe View Post

facepalm.gif

There are a lot more requirements just to get a license. One can't just get a license and buy a Hayabusa like I recommend.
post #3382 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post

Yup. Born and raised.

West Indians in the place. I am a Bajan

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post

I swung by the Mods & Rockers event here in Toronto today. Some hipsters, some beautiful bikes but the stand out was a vintage Vincent in working condition. There was also one of the new Norton 961 Cafe Racers there.

I rode up for Caribana a couple years back (08) from scenic Maryland. Rode up with a bunch of slow riders...shit was nice yet horrible because of the pace.



Ended up blazing down the QEW at what I found out later was impound speeds. The motorcycle gods were smiling down on me that day my friends and all was well




Rented a nice house in Danforth: 5 minutes from the beach and 10 minutes from downtown. We feted every night til we dropped. I love Toronto...well during the summer that is.
Edited by Rumpelstiltskin - 8/18/13 at 6:09am
post #3383 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kookz View Post

99% of bikes these days still don't have slippers, you're acting as if downshifting has changed.

Actually just about all sportbikes come with slipper clutches as standard equipment and have been for nearly 10 years. Even the Ninja 300 has a slipper. So yes downshifting has changed. People just bang down no matter what the engine speed and the clutch handles the details

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kookz View Post

Also, why are you downshifting in the middle of a turn?

WTF are you talking about? When did I ever mention downshifting in the middle of a turn? Might want to get your specs checked

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kookz View Post

Chirping the back wheel, while not ideal, is certainly not resulting in anyone going down if they are shifting when they should be. The level where this becomes troublesome is far beyond where a new rider should be riding and is rather irrelevant.

Perhaps you should have paid attention to the words that I typed. I was specifically addressing mistakes that new riders make. NEW RIDERS. If one does not rev match properly while downshifting, especially on a large displacement bike, one can lock up the rear tire. In the wet this could easily lead a new rider to get sideways and go down.
Edited by Rumpelstiltskin - 8/19/13 at 7:06am
post #3384 of 4600

With or without a slipper clutch, throttle blipping on down shifts is a good idea...
 

post #3385 of 4600
Even as a new rider Im not sure I ever downshifted in a turn... maybe right before the turn but not in a turn. Too much shit going on

Chirping the back tire on a bike w/o a slipper is kind of funny though. I am sure my clutch hates me for that. But if the bike is straight up it won't do anything weird.
post #3386 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kookz View Post

Agreed. Back on topic, my little chopper parked against the wall and my 78 F-250 Supercab. Don't need to do the 142 miles each way to the track next time I go, so I guess I should get another track day booked soon.
IMG_0546.jpg

Need to get this thing back together, cracked the left side engine case and haven't bothered to put the 2 hours into replacing it for a year now.

55Productions679.jpg

I would kill for that truck.  Or at least maim...

post #3387 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post

West Indians in the place. I am a Bajan
I rode up for Caribana a couple years back (08) from scenic Maryland. Rode up with a bunch of slow riders...shit was nice yet horrible because of the pace.



Ended up blazing down the QEW at what I found out later was impound speeds. The motorcycle gods were smiling down on me that day my friends and all was well




Rented a nice house in Danforth: 5 minutes from the beach and 10 minutes from downtown. We feted every night til we dropped. I love Toronto...well during the summer that is.


Nice nice. Thanks to the beaches and 2 women in particular, I have a soft spot for B'dos.

Caribana is good times but I stopped going down to the Lakeshore when they put up the high fences so ppl like me couldn't dip in and out to take a lil wine.
post #3388 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post


Nice nice. Thanks to the beaches and 2 women in particular, I have a soft spot for B'dos.

Caribana is good times but I stopped going down to the Lakeshore when they put up the high fences so ppl like me couldn't dip in and out to take a lil wine.


We got around that one year.  Guyanese photographer buddy of mine published a book depicting the various major carnivals in North America, specifically New York, Miami & Toronto. 

 

 

He arranged for us to have "press passes" so we were inside of the fence.  I was tiefin wine left right and center.  Madness! I love T.O.  If Canada didn't have such cold winters I would move there.

 

 

Haven't been to Trinidad yet but I plan on being there this February

post #3389 of 4600

Back to bike pics.  This was created by http://www.roughcrafts.com

 

 

Harley Davidson Sportster

Harley Davidson Sportster

Harley Davidson Sportster

Harley Davidson Sportster

Harley Davidson Sportster

Harley Davidson Sportster

post #3390 of 4600

Interesting vid if a bit long (almost 13 minutes)

 

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