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Motorcycles - Page 225

post #3361 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

This whole "what bike should a newbie get, and why?" discussion has been hashed and rehashed here many times. None of you are breaking any new ground.
Nobody claimed to be

What can be said has been said... back to the subject at hand

post #3362 of 4723
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SplasH View Post

What you keep missing (voluntarily or not) is that any new rider, on any new bike, will not know where its limits are.

No because that's irrelevant. I have not taken it myself, but loving the book and the dvd he made, i would say a course like the one from Keith Code is a good idea : http://www.superbikeschool.com/curriculum/the-levels.php I've taken similar courses, and yes it makes a difference.


Also any course that teach you how to set up the suspensions and more generally take care of your bike is another good idea.

What you are missing is that pretty much no rider except for professional racers will ever know what the limits of a bike are.
post #3363 of 4723
Thread Starter 
This is fun.

So, I'm arguing with three guys that either A) don't have or have never ridden a bike B) has a bike but can barely handle it and C) have never taken a formal course.

And, all three are telling me how A) a new rider should start out B) telling me what kind of bike a person should get and C) that a formal training course doesn't teach you about the limits or your motorcycle.

It's amazing that the three of you have so many opinions about things that you don't have any experience with.
post #3364 of 4723
????

Who here doesnt ride?
B is debatable
Who here rides and hasnt taken the MSF course?

Heres the wrap up... your insistence that starting off on a slow bike is a stupid idea is stupid. As is using the fact that you survived starting on an R1 as justification for new riders to start on "whatever they are comfortable on... as long as they take the MSF". Every bike is comfortable sitting still.

Its bad advice. Lets just move on
post #3365 of 4723
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Yes, I was way too aggressive and unable to manage my bike's speed WHEN I FIRST STARTED RIDING.

I was comfortable very quickly and apparently much more quickly than you. Deal with it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Now I am comfortable and confident on the bike, after having had the couple of months and thousands of miles needed to get the muscle memory and learn the bike's limits.

You don't know and probably never will know your bikes limits. Or, any bike for that matter.

Something that would have come even faster on a smaller bike.

Not necessarily. Every bike is different. You could go from a small bike to another small bike and it will be very different. This is true for even experienced riders.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

What the fuck does this even mean? If you get a bike that is beyond your skill level you should "use it" (as in tap into whatever potential it has beyond your skill level) NEVER.
I laid it out already. You blasted the notion that people should start on small bikes and then posted your experience of starting on an R1 as an example of someone surviving starting out on a big bike. And now you are trying to act like that's what you didn't do despite it all being on the record here.

It means that buying a bigger bike than a 750 (or whatever) isn't for everyone (like you). Once again, I mentioned why I bought the R1 and it wasn't as a beginner bike. It was to make money. You can't read. From now on I won't comment on your posts unless you can quote exactly what I said.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Bottom line folks have their whole lives to ride... a couple of months or a year on a 250-500 won't hurt anybody and calling such advice stupid (which you did) or suggesting that starting on an R1 is fine (which you did) is terrible, irresponsible advice, period, and representative of a rider more concerned with... ego? image? than safety and actually being a good, skilled, competent rider. Such a person should not be offering riding advice. Don't take it personally

Sigh. No, I never said it was ok to start out on an R1. Please re-read that again. Also, I never said it was stupid to start out on a smaller bike. I said that if you are going to purchase a bike you should get one that you are confident with, feel comfortable with, and can handle. You are mentally retarded. What I take personally is you misquoting what I said and then commenting on it. I'll ask you again to stop.

Plus, aren't you the one wearing jeans while riding your bike and how you are riding a bike that you can't / couldn't handle? And you're going to talk to me about safety? I'd suggest getting the proper gear, getting a smaller bike that you can handle, and then moving up when you're ready and confident.
post #3366 of 4723
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Who here doesnt ride?

The first guy that commented on my post won't answer questions about whether or not he has a bike or any training. I can only assume that he doesn't ride or have a bike. Am I wrong?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

B is debatable

Lol! Not really. But I forgot, you don't read.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Who here rides and hasnt taken the MSF course?

Frenchy hasn't but he has no problem criticizing people like myself who have taken several (both beginning and advanced) and telling me that I've learned nothing from them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Heres the wrap up... your insistence that starting off on a slow bike is a stupid idea is stupid. As is using the fact that you survived starting on an R1 as justification for new riders to start on "whatever they are comfortable on... as long as they take the MSF". Every bike is comfortable sitting still.

Its bad advice. Lets just move on

I'm not sure why you quoted me because I didn't say any those things. I'll ask you to either quote me or remove it.
Edited by Tck13 - 8/17/13 at 7:57pm
post #3367 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post


DAMN SON HOW YOU GON DO ME LIKE DAT?

I'm not even wearing a flannel shirt or Bell 500 helmet in that pic shog[1].gif

 

photo laugh3-smiley_zpsdf07b25b.gifphoto laugh3-smiley_zpsdf07b25b.gifphoto laugh3-smiley_zpsdf07b25b.gif

 

Sidenote:   Are you from TnT?  If not why did you choose the name Trini?


Edited by Rumpelstiltskin - 8/17/13 at 2:13pm
post #3368 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 View Post

This is fun.

So, I'm arguing with three guys that either A) don't have or have never ridden a bike B) has a bike but can barely handle it and C) have never taken a formal course.

And, all three are telling me how A) a new rider should start out B) telling me what kind of bike a person should get and C) that a formal training course doesn't teach you about the limits or your motorcycle.

It's amazing that the three of you have so many opinions about things that you don't have any experience with.

 

You need to quit while you are behind

post #3369 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 View Post

I said that if you are going to purchase a bike you should get one that you are confident with, feel comfortable with, and can handle.

Like you did?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 
buying a 1300cc as my first official bike (I had a YZF-R1 first - long story) worked out great for me. As a matter of fact, the power of that bike was PERFECT for me as was the size of the bike. It fit like a glove.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 
It took a couple of months before I felt ready to even go on an hour ride on the highway... And then I spent hours picking up my bike, doing slow speed drills / turns / braking[/B]

While you keep claiming your first bike was a great choice, every experience you've related indicates it wasn't. Despite completing your training courses and getting your license, which indicates you had sufficient training for riding a motorcycle on public roads, you were unsure of your ability to handle it on the road and so tooled around parking lots for two months, and you dropped it repeatedly during low-speed maneuvers. This is not normal behavior. Those are the symptoms of a new rider with too much bike. You previously wrote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 
there are some arrogant people out there that are cocky with their abilities. Each rider has to know their own experience. I knew mine despite people on here telling me I didn't. I know myself better than anyone on the interwebzzz.

The reason I said that was ironic before is that you're clearly just like the person you describe. You ignored everyone's advice, bought too much bike and spent months tip-toeing around parking lots (also driving late at night/early morning with no cars around, I'll bet), and you're so arrogant you can't even consider the possibility you were mistaken, even when everyone disagrees with you. Think about that: you're saying everyone else is wrong. That's pretty much the defining characteristic of arrogance.

You can try to rationalize it by claiming you know yourself better than we'll ever know you, we weren't there, etc., but the other side of that is all we know is what you, your most biased and invested advocate, have told us, and you still come off as being in the wrong. We universally think you're wrong when we likely don't even know the most egregious blunders you made.
post #3370 of 4723

Just to be clear, getting a French license is 20 hours of driving lessons on the bike, close track and open road. I had to do it twice, one with a 125cc and one with a 500cc because it's two different licenses.

 

Aside of that one of my best friend and coach rode in the world endurance championship and finished 4th at Le Mans last year and i've been taking one riding course every year or so for the fast 6-7 years... I could recommend you a good french course, i'm just not really aware of all the kind of courses that goes around the world. Sorry.

 

So yeah, I'm quite confident entering this pissing contest...

 

Back to the main topic, that last ducati looks amazing. Is that a 1000GT ?

post #3371 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post

photo laugh3-smiley_zpsdf07b25b.gif
photo laugh3-smiley_zpsdf07b25b.gif
photo laugh3-smiley_zpsdf07b25b.gif


Sidenote:   Are you from TnT?  If not why did you choose the name Trini?

Yup. Born and raised.

I swung by the Mods & Rockers event here in Toronto today. Some hipsters, some beautiful bikes but the stand out was a vintage Vincent in working condition. There was also one of the new Norton 961 Cafe Racers there.
post #3372 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post

I learned to ride in the days before slipper clutches so rev matching while downshifting was important, esp on damp roads.  Chirp that back wheel when dew is on the street and you will end up on the street.  Won't learn that in the parking lot. 
99% of bikes these days still don't have slippers, you're acting as if downshifting has changed. Also, why are you downshifting in the middle of a turn? Chirping the back wheel, while not ideal, is certainly not resulting in anyone going down if they are shifting when they should be. The level where this becomes troublesome is far beyond where a new rider should be riding and is rather irrelevant.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post


Learning to blip the throttle with the thumb and the index finger while simultaneously working the clutch with your middle and ring finger takes time and plenty practice.  Won't learn that in the parking lot because there is no need for it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post


Are you saying you cannot blip the throttle and pull the clutch at the same time?  Really?

facepalm.gif
post #3373 of 4723
This thread is starting to give me a headache.ffffuuuu.gif
post #3374 of 4723
Agreed. Back on topic, my little chopper parked against the wall and my 78 F-250 Supercab. Don't need to do the 142 miles each way to the track next time I go, so I guess I should get another track day booked soon.
IMG_0546.jpg

Need to get this thing back together, cracked the left side engine case and haven't bothered to put the 2 hours into replacing it for a year now.

55Productions679.jpg
post #3375 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kookz View Post

Agreed. Back on topic, my little chopper parked against the wall and my 78 F-250 Supercab. Don't need to do the 142 miles each way to the track next time I go, so I guess I should get another track day booked soon.
IMG_0546.jpg

Need to get this thing back together, cracked the left side engine case and haven't bothered to put the 2 hours into replacing it for a year now.

55Productions679.jpg


Great shot on the bike! 

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