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Motorcycles - Page 220

post #3286 of 4515
I think the advice from the blog in Trini's post is really good. In fact, I may need to spend some more time practicing with the front brake in a parking lot.
post #3287 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I think the advice from the blog in Trini's post is really good. In fact, I may need to spend some more time practicing with the front brake in a parking lot.

My front break is so crappy that I could never possibly have that problem (I've tried).
post #3288 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

My front break is so crappy that I could never possibly have that problem (I've tried).

I had a close call last night - I wound up having to move into the shoulder area because I started locking up.
post #3289 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I think the advice from the blog in Trini's post is really good. In fact, I may need to spend some more time practicing with the front brake in a parking lot.

 

When I was 14 or 15, I envisioned myself racing and winning the Tour de France and so I set up a rigid training schedule.  I lived in Eastern Queens back then and I would ride out to the velodrome in Kissena Park (this is back in the 80s) in Flushing and ride laps.  I had read (and experienced) that the front brake performed 85-95% of the braking duties.  I had a track bike ("fixie" for the hipsters or a "constant" for any West Indians) for back then with only a front brake so front brake use only (as well as modulation to avoid lock ups) was second nature.  One of the first things I noticed when I started riding motorcycles was that most new riders would only use their rear brakes and were frightened to touch the front for fear of flipping over.  I have never had that issue thanks to my childhood obsession.

post #3290 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Is it worth it to upgrade my chain on the kz400?

Its a standard chain and its got a little bit of rust on some of the outside plates, but otherwise seems to be in good condition. Don't think it is too stretched or anything...it can't be the original chain that came with the bike (34 years and 28k miles wouldn't leave it looking like that).

The guy who mounted my tires suggested putting on an o-ring chain, but I can't really see why other than increased longevity and decreased maintenance. Replacing a still-good part for better longevity doesn't make sense (since it hasn't worn out yet). Since the bike sometimes gets rained on and sits outside, I probably want to keep it freshly lubed anyways because the outside will start to rust up even if the o-rings are keeping the insides nice and lubed.

Just not sure if there is any good reason to spend a hundred bucks on something that is working fine now.

 

As long as it isn't stretched out and you keep it cleaned and lubed, rock on

post #3291 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post

When I was 14 or 15, I envisioned myself racing and winning the Tour de France and so I set up a rigid training schedule.  I lived in Eastern Queens back then and I would ride out to the velodrome in Kissena Park (this is back in the 80s) in Flushing and ride laps.  I had read (and experienced) that the front brake performed 85-95% of the braking duties.  I had a track bike ("fixie" for the hipsters or a "constant" for any West Indians) for back then with only a front brake so front brake use only (as well as modulation to avoid lock ups) was second nature.  One of the first things I noticed when I started riding motorcycles was that most new riders would only use their rear brakes and were frightened to touch the front for fear of flipping over.  I have never had that issue thanks to my childhood obsession.

I have no problem using it at all, but when I squeezed the brake my bike started sliding around. I was able to maintain control and avoid laying it down, flipping it, or hitting the stopped car in front of me, but I feel like I should have been able to do a better job.
post #3292 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 View Post


I think you mean uneducable or ineducable. Just because someone buys a bike other than a 750 doesn't mean that they automatically don't know anything about riding, don't want to learn anything about riding, etc. While there are many riders like this I don't believe it's the majority. Also, one can buy a fittingly sized bike and handle it / learn how to handle it quite well.

Now it's all Americans that don't know how to ride well? And all Americans like guns but can't shoot well? I assume that you don't live in America. How much training have you had with your bike and how many miles a year do you ride? Just curious.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epb View Post


Your responses indicate a radical, almost willfull misreading of the text. In short, I'm acknowledging that while it's possible for people to figure out how to ride a motorcycle with no training on a poorly-chosen bike, it's not the best way to learn. This is not a radical concept - it applies to pretty much all walks of life; playing guitar, computer programming, poetry, fighting, neurosurgery. In the end, the person pursuing any endeavor has to decide whether they want to do the best they can or just get by - really learn to play, or just learn the opening riff to "Smoke On The Water." I'm of the view that a new rider's main focus should be on learning to ride well, with strong grounding in the fundamentals of riding technique, safety practices, and bike maintenance. Then again, I'm also of the opinion people playing intruments should be able to read music and people writing novels should know sentence structure and the rules of grammar.

You don't agree? I've got great news - you don't have to! The hope is that when new riders go looking for viewpoints on a first bike, they see various ones from experienced riders and decide what will work for them. You're more than welcome to state your views on the topic, as I did, and let them stand. No need to clutter the thread with anecdotes about how cousin Billy-Bob learned on a Ducati 916 when he was 12 and went on to when the Isle of Man TT.

 

New male riders love to tell themselves (and anyone who can listen) that they will control themselves and will respect the power.,  The simple fact of the matter is that riders who start out on small bikes and gradually move up the ladder (or even stay on their smaller displacement bikes) end up being better riders than those riders that start out on larger displacement bikes.  How can you master learning to ride when the vehicle scares you half to death?  You can't. 

 

I remember coming across a guy who said he used to ride and his first bike was a CBR1000 because his buddies said anything smaller was for girls.  The guy proudly told me he had never even hit 6th gear because he was too frightened.  What happened to the bike?  He crashed it of course.

 

Another guy I know had ridden a 125cc scooter for 2 years or so but after seeing people like me riding decided to get a bike.  I tried to help him out but he kept getting advice from scores of well meaning idiots.  gsxr750 is a good beginner bike.  Anything under 1000 cc is for girls, etc.  The guy ended up getting a Hyabusa and I just prayed I wouldn't have to attend his funeral.  Luckily his 2 crashes were minor and he has since sworn off riding forever. 

post #3293 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post


I have no problem using it at all, but when I squeezed the brake my bike started sliding around. I was able to maintain control and avoid laying it down, flipping it, or hitting the stopped car in front of me, but I feel like I should have been able to do a better job.


have your brake pads checked out and replace them if necessary.  They should provide you with enough feedback that you can feel an impending lockup.  Have them check and/or replace your brake lines as well. 

post #3294 of 4515

Hi guys, after joining the forum I thought i'd start with this thread, being a motorcycle fan and rider for the past 16 years or so...

 

I had an old yamaha DTR 50 to go to school but i quickly moved on to a 125cc Aprilia RS with a tetsuya harada replica paint. A true beauty of style and engineering at the time... Sorry i don't have pictures of mine, my camera wasn't digital at that time :)

 

 

After keeping this one for 3 years, i had to sell it to buy a car (true mistake, they're worth a fortune now...).

 

Anyway i then got my "big bikes" license and moved on to a Ducati 750 SSie, again, a very good bike, that lacked in power what it had in style.

 

 

I have to mention that even though it was a ducati, i never had a single problem with it. It ran beautiffuly even with 20 000 miles on it. After a friend totalled it on a test ride, I moved on to a "cheap and easy to maintain" bikes. Starting with a Yamaha 600 Genesis FZR (1991), which is the bike i would recommand to any person starting with sports bikes. It's cheap, it runs fast, and it's not that outdated when nicely serviced.

 

 

After the FZR i had a Kawasaki ZX6R Ninja from 1996, which was really fun to drive. So fun in fact that i had to buy a second one for track use only :) I don't know what it is that makes kawasaki bikes such a thrill to drive, but it is real.

 

Here's the road one

 

 

And finally after riding it as an everyday transportation in Paris till it broke (litterally... frames from that period were not that well made and cracked), I am now the proud owner of a Honda RC51 SP1 from 2001 that I only use for trackdays and short rides in the countryside. This is the bike that really made me fell in love with bikes in 2001 when i was watching colin edwards race for the world championship. I'm really happy to have the chance to own one.

 

 

 

 

So yeah, a lot of sports bike, but that's the only kind i'm really confortable with.

 

 

And to help with the topic, in the checking the brake routine, you can also change your brake fluid, obviously goes with replacing the brake lines, but if the lines dont get any compression from braking, just a fluid change can do wonders. And you shouldn't slide when braking in front, unless it's very slippery on the ground. Engage the brakes by pressing lightly, then harder will ensure you you'll almost never lock the front wheel or go over the bike. Bikes are made to get a 80 front /20 rear brake repartition, so not using the front is complete nonsense.

 

Thanks for reading and sorry for the long post.

post #3295 of 4515

Great story and great bikes.

 

What's required to get on a track?

post #3296 of 4515

Not much.

 

Either you have a licence to ride from the motorcycle federation and you can ride any bike, or you have a road bike and the license that goes with it. Aside of that, tracks require that you wear protections like a one piece leather suit, helmet (duh), gloves, boots and that your bike is equipped with the minimum safety features like a chain guard, a system to catch the oil when you fall so that you don't spoil the track for everybody else.

 

That's for open days, if you want to seriously race, each series has its own set of rules but aside of driver protection, it's mainly bike equipments that are specific to a race series. Like modifications you're allowed to make or not and so on.

post #3297 of 4515
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioImpemba View Post

Great story and great bikes.

 

What's required to get on a track?


tape on glass parts, water or water wetter instead of antifreeze, safety wire bolts that release fluids like the oil drain plug i believe

post #3298 of 4515

I was curious in terms of licensing or anything. I think to get on a road-track with a car, you somehow need to demonstrate that you have autocross experience, at least?

 

I keep eyeballing this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/121142687071?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

 

How bad do you think the road rash compromises structural integrity?

post #3299 of 4515

Very badly.

 

I would never wear a suit that crashed. Not for racing purpose at least. Even though it can only have a minor scratch, the stiching took a hit too, and you never know how/when it's gonna wear. Aside of that, on a vintage suit, it's gonna be a pain to fin suitable protection to replace those who took the fall (if there is any, not sure from the pictures...). It doesn't seem to have a back pocket either... To finish, cow leather isn't the best around when it comes to protection gear, kangaroo is much more resistant. 300$ + shipping is also a lot when all you get is a worn out leather pants and jacket... For a not so vintage option you can get this kind of things : http://www.ebay.com/itm/Retro-Vintage-Classic-Black-Biker-Leather-Motorcycle-Motorbike-Jacket-Pant-SUIT-/300816033911?var=&hash=item460a086877 but that's almost as good as it gets for a cheap suit. If you want serious protection, it's gonna be more around 500$, if you're only concerned about the style, yeah, go cheap but i would never recommand being cheap when it comes to protection gear :)

 

As for going on a track with a car, not living in the US i wouldn't know what the rules and regulations are over there. Here you can call the local track and ask when they have an open day you can come in with a road car and all you need then is an insurance and a driving license.

post #3300 of 4515

Dunno about buying an old suit for trackwear.  Besides some tracks do not allow 2 piece suits.  Now I have an all black Teknic Chicane 1 piece suit that has never been down with virginal knee pucks. It has been sitting in the closet untouched for the last 3 years and I'm not sure I will ever fit it again *rubs belly*  Interested?

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