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Motorcycles - Page 208

post #3106 of 4723
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Edited by John Doe - 7/16/13 at 11:16am
post #3107 of 4723

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Edited by EgliComet - 7/16/13 at 11:20am
post #3108 of 4723
^?
Thanks for the pic. Looks like a nice job.
post #3109 of 4723
Lol. You guys...
post #3110 of 4723
Just picked up a motorcycle jack off of Craigslist today for $20.

Let the mods commence.
post #3111 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by EgliComet View Post

I manage a private collection on Long Island.

 

I'm an avid motorcycle test pilot

post #3112 of 4723
Is that Billy Joel's garage?

Q for anyone- I recently sold my track car and want to take up moyorcycles. Thinking about one of those new 500cc honda cbrs to learn on. Any reason that wouldnt be a good move?
post #3113 of 4723

Saw this for sale on craigslist the other day, on 06 MV August Brutale 910.   Only $8k

 

 

Now this made my lil winkie stand up.

post #3114 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

Is that Billy Joel's garage?

Q for anyone- I recently sold my track car and want to take up moyorcycles. Thinking about one of those new 500cc honda cbrs to learn on. Any reason that wouldnt be a good move?

Conventional wisdom is that you should start on a smaller bike (125cc or 250cc) and once you're comfortable, then progress to a larger one. Don't forget that you're quite likely to drop the bike a couple of times when you're learning so you might want to do that on a beater bike and then sell it to another beginner when you're ready to go bigger.
post #3115 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

Is that Billy Joel's garage?

Q for anyone- I recently sold my track car and want to take up moyorcycles. Thinking about one of those new 500cc honda cbrs to learn on. Any reason that wouldnt be a good move?

The bike itself is good, but as TRINI points out, typically it's recommended that you start on a smaller bike. Overseas, you're legally stuck with 125cc for a year or two. New riders normally assume this is to prevent antics like speeding, wheelies, stoppies, and such. Really, it's to provide something of a reaction envelope while you gain experience with the controls - too much throttle or brake at the wrong time can have dire consequences with 500cc, while with considerably less horsepower you can back-off or correct before disaster strikes. And, imo, someone coming from a car needs to adjust to the sort of constant vigilance that riding a motorcycle requires - the pothole you missed seeing in a car could have you lying in the road on a bike.

Moving from a dirtbike to street, the uncle that taught me to ride insisted I get something bigger than the Honda 175 I liked, then bitched every time I had a close call on the 400cc bike I wound up with (grr!). We argued about engine size and horsepower requirements the rest of his life - to him, nothing less than 1000cc was worth riding, while the largest engine I've had is my Honda NT650 (which I've still got). If I were starting out now, I'd get a lightly-used Ninja 300 or CBR250R.
post #3116 of 4723
I have a Ninja 650 now... power-wise ~30-40HP off of a "true" 600. In the twisties it has more than more than enough power. Its more important attribute there is good fueling and smooth throttle response. On the highway with a fairing it will easily + comfortably cruise (not scream/top out) at 100, 110, 120 etc. Around town the only things quicker off the line are other motorcycles. I plan on making a lateral move to an SV650 and hopefully riding that forever. Someone on a YT video I recently watched put it perfectly- a liter bike on the street is like a 30" dick. Where are you ever even gonna use half of it? Couple that with the higher running costs (insurance, fuel) and the fact that many of them are theft magnets... it's just not worth it to me. My 650 doesn't scare me anymore (a good reason why they are not good beginner bikes) but I can't remember the last time it bored me or made me want more power. Especially since putting a fairing back on it. I like the SV more though because it sounds like sex, takes better to mods (i.e. overbore pistons, suspension upgrades) and has a stock half fairing.
post #3117 of 4723
I think those new honda 500s will be less rev-happy than your future bikes if you aim to take it to the track.

For that reason, I wonder if the ninja 250 wouldn't be a good bike to start with. It will get you used to keeping the engine revved up into the power band (since there's not much power to work with) which should translate well to future track time on something like a CBR600. The ninja redlines at something like 14-15k while the honda 500s only go to 8.5k.

At the same time, the 500 might not be a terrible choice. I've obviously never ridden one, but if they've got a long, smooth, power band, they are going to be a pretty forgiving bike and you might want to keep it longer than the ninja 250. They sound like awesome bikes and I might want one myself in the future...but if your plan is to move into a real sportsbike after you get your bearings, then I think you would be better suited by learning how to push the ninjette to its limits and then stepping up.
post #3118 of 4723
Good points. I hadnt considered the thinking about the powerband.

My only reservation with the 250 bikes is that around here I am need to use major highways before I can get to any decent routes for riding.
post #3119 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

Good points. I hadnt considered the thinking about the powerband.

My only reservation with the 250 bikes is that around here I am need to use major highways before I can get to any decent routes for riding.

I mean, if you end up loving the 500, or want to switch to some other lower revving bike (a ducati monster rev limiter kicks in at like 9k), that consideration doesn't matter as much. Its just that if you plan to switch to some 4-cyl supersports bike that revs ultra-high...you might as well have gotten used to the high revs.

The 250 can still take you down a highway. It will just be revved kind of high and maybe not that comfortable. You might also consider the new 300...its got more power and still revs high (just not as available on the used market yet).
post #3120 of 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

Good points. I hadnt considered the thinking about the powerband.

My only reservation with the 250 bikes is that around here I am need to use major highways before I can get to any decent routes for riding.


250s are highway legal and can hit over 110 mph with a decent tailwind

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