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Motorcycles - Page 132

post #1966 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbleboys View Post

Your faith that every new rider will have the same self control and experience you do is truly inspiring.

A squid is a squid whether he's on a 250 single or Gixxer.
post #1967 of 6968
So I've been working on a 73 Honda CB250 with a friend. Essentially he had a bike without a title, then bought a frame with a title, so we're taking everything off the old frame and putting it on the new one. It's a pretty cool learning experience. This was all with the intention of buying it for like $600 and learning to ride on it.

I want a more powerful one to eventually ride to work, and found this 74 Honda CB550 online for $1200. I'm considering buying this one instead:

201

This a good bike to learn on? I know it's great because it's easy to work on. I haven't ridden before but am planning on taking the classes, getting a helmet and all the gear and stuff. Would it be a bad idea to go right up to the 550 and learn on that?
post #1968 of 6968
Shouldn't be a problem learning on a 550, but I am of the learn on a bigger bike school anyway. The first bike I spent much time on was an old Yamaha XS Eleven Special that I bought for $1200.

I like the ammo can luggage on that Honda. Younger guys seem to have no problem with the leaned-forward riding position which those bars will give you. You might want to give riding position some consideration. A riding position which is comfortable and fun for a few minutes may be torture if you hold it for a few hours.
post #1969 of 6968
Quote:
I like the ammo can luggage on that Honda. Younger guys seem to have no problem with the leaned-forward riding position which those bars will give you. You might want to give riding position some consideration. A riding position which is comfortable and fun for a few minutes may be torture if you hold it for a few hours.

Not planning on riding this on long trips, just gonna use this for day-to-day stuff, i.e. riding around town, to work, etc. I'll probably buy a second one for trips shortly after riding this for a few weeks, at which point I'll tear down one of the two and rebuild it.

Always wanted a cafe, one to ride on longer trips, and some kind of cooler vintage bike to show off.
post #1970 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnowYourRights View Post

A squid is a squid whether he's on a 250 single or Gixxer.

True, but a squid on a 250 is less likely to kill themselves and/or someone else than if they were on a gsxr, cbr, zx6r, r6, etc.

Just off the top of my head, you pretty much eliminate the following accidents by starting a squid or new rider on a 250
- endo
- anything other than a very deliberate clutch wheelie, which even requires you to bounce the front end (without a sprocket kit, don't know how easily 250s with a different sprocket wheelie)
- significantly less likely to die by being ham-fisted

A 250 gives some of those squids a chance to grow out of their squidly ways; not all will make it, but those who don't were going to kill themselves doing something dangerous anyways.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khayembii Communique View Post

So I've been working on a 73 Honda CB250 with a friend. Essentially he had a bike without a title, then bought a frame with a title, so we're taking everything off the old frame and putting it on the new one. It's a pretty cool learning experience. This was all with the intention of buying it for like $600 and learning to ride on it.
I want a more powerful one to eventually ride to work, and found this 74 Honda CB550 online for $1200. I'm considering buying this one instead:
201
This a good bike to learn on? I know it's great because it's easy to work on. I haven't ridden before but am planning on taking the classes, getting a helmet and all the gear and stuff. Would it be a bad idea to go right up to the 550 and learn on that?

That's a nice classic bike.

For a bike that old with 500cc, I really wouldn't be all that worried.
Talking out of my ass, today's Ninja250 is probably about as powerful as that '74 honda cb550 given performance improvements over time, etc.

My only concern is there is a very likely chance you're going to drop the bike at least once in your first year of riding.
I imagine spare parts will be hard to find.
post #1971 of 6968
Quote:
I imagine spare parts will be hard to find.

How would parts be hard to find for that bike? Isn't it among probably the most common bikes out there?
post #1972 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbleboys View Post

My only concern is there is a very likely chance you're going to drop the bike at least once in your first year of riding.
I imagine spare parts will be hard to find.

I have ridden for 6 years, never dropped a bike. Will it happen someday? Pretty good chance it will.

There are thousands of those bikes in salvage yards all over the country. Parts should not be a problem.
post #1973 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

I have ridden for 6 years, never dropped a bike. Will it happen someday? Pretty good chance it will.
There are thousands of those bikes in salvage yards all over the country. Parts should not be a problem.

Don't forget to knock on wood :thumbup:

Oh, I just see classic/old bike = parts hard to get.
I don't really know classic bikes; I'm more into modern sportbikes.
post #1974 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by gnatty8 View Post

A picture of my chick bike, which the dresser set lovingly refers to as the "skirtster"
p1030720version2.jpg

Gnatty, plan on chopping the rear fender?

Would look cleannn with a rear fender chop, rsd clips/ gauge relocation, and getting rid of those springs underneath the seat.
post #1975 of 6968
I learned on a VFR800. It was too much bike and I think it was a mistake. But I really, really hated having to rev the shit out of a 250 on a regular basis just to get going. Shame there aren't 400s available in the US easily.
post #1976 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khayembii Communique View Post

Not planning on riding this on long trips, just gonna use this for day-to-day stuff, i.e. riding around town, to work, etc. I'll probably buy a second one for trips shortly after riding this for a few weeks, at which point I'll tear down one of the two and rebuild it.
Always wanted a cafe, one to ride on longer trips, and some kind of cooler vintage bike to show off.

Look up bejis cafe racers if you buy that 550, bcr tanks/seats are sexual on honda cb's
post #1977 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat pearson View Post

Look up bejis cafe racers if you buy that 550, bcr tanks/seats are sexual on honda cb's

You mean like this?

272
post #1978 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat pearson View Post

Look up benjis cafe racers if you buy that 550, bcr tanks/seats are sexual on honda cb's

FTFY.
post #1979 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat pearson View Post

Gnatty, plan on chopping the rear fender?
Would look cleannn with a rear fender chop, rsd clips/ gauge relocation, and getting rid of those springs underneath the seat.

Probably not, but who knows.

In the "reminders to always watch your rear view mirrors" category, was riding home from the mountains today when I noticed a guy driving a big fruit delivery truck coming up fast on me at a light. He stopped abruptly, but my spider sense was tingling about this shithead. Next light, I watched him come up on me again, and then heard the sound of tires squealing as he broke hard, and saw him veer into the left hand turning lane. He came to a stop in the lane over, about a foot from my back tire!! I was lucky I didn't have to pull out into traffic to avoid him. Be careful out there..
post #1980 of 6968
Quote:
Originally Posted by gnatty8 View Post

Probably not, but who knows.
In the "reminders to always watch your rear view mirrors" category, was riding home from the mountains today when I noticed a guy driving a big fruit delivery truck coming up fast on me at a light. He stopped abruptly, but my spider sense was tingling about this shithead. Next light, I watched him come up on me again, and then heard the sound of tires squealing as he broke hard, and saw him veer into the left hand turning lane. He came to a stop in the lane over, about a foot from my back tire!! I was lucky I didn't have to pull out into traffic to avoid him. Be careful out there..

That is the bad thing about being in front at a light, no place to go when someone is charging up on you from behind. In that situation I stop about 10 feet short of the line so I have a little room to maneuver. With cars ahead of me, I am 10 feet behind the car, pointing toward a gap between cars, bike in first gear, both hands on the bars, right foot on brake, eyes in mirrors waiting for the car coming from behind. You can relax a little once that car approaches and stops.

Not addressing you, gnatty8, but if any of you newbs don't understand why I do all that stuff then you need to take a class and give some serious thought to what is going on out in the street.
Edited by Steve Smith - 4/8/12 at 2:57pm
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