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Antiques - why? - Page 2

post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart
Elementary school chic?
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Elementary school chic?

My thought exactly.

All they need are some Eames chairs...

Jon.
post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Elementary school chic?


Jean Prouve made some amazing school desks. They are hard to find, and when found can easily be in the six figure range. His Standard chairs also have an elementary school vibe.
post #19 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Jean Prouve made some amazing school desks. They are hard to find, and when found can easily be in the six figure range. His Standard chairs also have an elementary school vibe.

You might also want to take a look at TH Robsjohn-Gibbings' furniture, if you don't know it. Much the same aesthetic, although somewhat more classicist in approach and expression.
post #20 of 59
Those are actually side tables, ours are the ones that have a drawer at the bottom. Altho Elementary school chic wouldnt be too far off since my gf is finishing her credential to be an elementary school teacher.
post #21 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
I think that there is no doubt that "classic modern" is as much a period look as edwardian is at this point. My taste tends to more contemporary, although I do like some modernist and some antique.

I agree - the term "klassisch modern" seems to be the accepted term in e.g. German. The definition of antiques as applied arts objects more than a 100 years old is also a widely accepted one, and the term is also codified in many countries. (Export licences, insurance, etc.) Although considering the natural shortage of domestic antiques in the US, I suspect the definition is rather stretched there.

Compared to Europe, the ratio of antiques to population in the US is very different, the much stronger European habit of warring on domestic soil notwithstanding. Typically, some of the best markets for antiques have been Germany and lately Russia, which were the countries where the worst destruction of property happened during WWII. It's simple supply and demand, combined with demographics.

I'm not trying to be all European and condescending here, but objects like this pre-date the great waves of immigration to the US in the 19th century:



This went for around $6.000 all included in an auction here. There’s nothing wrong or right (e.g. a signature) with it that’s not visible in the photo. Well, it was actually bought from abroad on the strength of this photo. Any thoughts as to the value in America?

Elsie de Wolfe, the legendary interior designer in the "tart's boudoir" style (think gilt rococo overdose) described her living as "Introducing new money to old furniture".

It seems that part of the job description these days is also "introducing old money to new and new-ish furniture", which actually is a lot harder. In a few years, it will be just "introducing money to furniture", I suppose.
post #22 of 59
I like the combination of high culture and Kantian tastes with John Waters camp, combined with controversial photography and obscurity. Perhaps a room painted entirely in black lacquer paint with an 18th century Swedish crystal chandelier and Persian rugs with Allen Jones coffee tables, Joel-Peter Witkin photographs put amongst the walls which are completely filled with 19th century Academic paintings. Sort of like a PostModernist Soane house.
post #23 of 59
Thread Starter 
Cheers - I actually tried to replicate the "Girl Table" once, - I share a loft with two friends of mine. The flat is a louche but run-down seventies bachelor pad - must have been very impressive in 1975.

Turns out they don't normally make window-dressing dolls in an all-fours position. And they're surprisingly expensive.

But I agree on the eclecticism. I'm tired of period reconstructions in interior decorating. Unless it's an actual historical room, or a recreation of one for, say, museum purposes, or it's done out of some sort of historical piety, I really can't see the point.

I think this very often happens for two reasons: People don't trust their own taste, and go for the pre-packaged look, or they actually have a real historical interest in a period. The last option is demanding - I recently heard of a man who lives in an enormous fin-de-siecle flat, with the original furniture, spartan waterworks and coke-burning stoves, all more or less worn out. Even the velvet rope bell-pulls for the help are intact. The story is that he inherited the flat, and just couldn't bring himself to alter it. I have to admire the dedication to historical correctness, but I could never live like that.
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
Cheers - I actually tried to replicate the "Girl Table" once, - I share a loft with two friends of mine. The flat is a louche but run-down seventies bachelor pad - must have been very impressive in 1975.

Turns out they don't normally make window-dressing dolls in an all-fours position. And they're surprisingly expensive.

But I agree on the eclecticism. I'm tired of period reconstructions in interior decorating. Unless it's an actual historical room, or a recreation of one for, say, museum purposes, or it's done out of some sort of historical piety, I really can't see the point.

I think this very often happens for two reasons: People don't trust their own taste, and go for the pre-packaged look, or they actually have a real historical interest in a period. The last option is demanding - I recently heard of a man who lives in an enormous fin-de-siecle flat, with the original furniture, spartan waterworks and coke-burning stoves, all more or less worn out. Even the velvet rope bell-pulls for the help are intact. The story is that he inherited the flat, and just couldn't bring himself to alter it. I have to admire the dedication to historical correctness, but I could never live like that.


That is well said.

I think that one reason that some people have a distaste for contemporary furniture is that they are only exposed to Ikea and ZGalerie, and not good modern design. Firms like Cappellini, Moooi and Zanotta (somewhat) are producing the pieces of furniture that are being shown in Modern art museums throughout the world. They are a far cry from Ikea.
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
That is well said.

I think that one reason that some people have a distaste for contemporary furniture is that they are only exposed to Ikea and ZGalerie, and not good modern design. Firms like Cappellini, Moooi and Zanotta (somewhat) are producing the pieces of furniture that are being shown in Modern art museums throughout the world. They are a far cry from Ikea.

also about 10x as expensive...you gets what you pays for.
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
Cheers - I actually tried to replicate the "Girl Table" once, - I share a loft with two friends of mine. The flat is a louche but run-down seventies bachelor pad - must have been very impressive in 1975.

Turns out they don't normally make window-dressing dolls in an all-fours position. And they're surprisingly expensive.

But I agree on the eclecticism. I'm tired of period reconstructions in interior decorating. Unless it's an actual historical room, or a recreation of one for, say, museum purposes, or it's done out of some sort of historical piety, I really can't see the point.

I think this very often happens for two reasons: People don't trust their own taste, and go for the pre-packaged look, or they actually have a real historical interest in a period. The last option is demanding - I recently heard of a man who lives in an enormous fin-de-siecle flat, with the original furniture, spartan waterworks and coke-burning stoves, all more or less worn out. Even the velvet rope bell-pulls for the help are intact. The story is that he inherited the flat, and just couldn't bring himself to alter it. I have to admire the dedication to historical correctness, but I could never live like that.

I love that decrepit nature of this '70s bachelor pad you describe, especially the fact that it was impressive in the '70s. It brings to minds sordid luxury gone to seed, literally, with mildewed shag and peeling veneer; a veritable utopic failure.

As for this fin-de-siecle set-up, I love the dedication and aesthetic desperation-like an old aristocrat fighting a desperate fight against money. Very McDermott & McGough
post #27 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
I love that decrepit nature of this '70s bachelor pad you describe, especially the fact that it was impressive in the '70s. It brings to minds sordid luxury gone to seed, literally, with mildewed shag and peeling veneer; a veritable utopic failure.

Decrepit is the word, the mildewed shag has been replaced, but the dark brown veneer in the kitchen/bar is peeling somewhat. It looks like Hugh Hefner with leprosy. It's split level, and one flatmate has built a complete little record studio (he makes electronica, sometimes with vocals) in the attic room. And although it's in the middle of town, noone can actually see what goes on on the roof terrace.
post #28 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
I'm not trying to be all European and condescending here, but objects like this pre-date the great waves of immigration to the US in the 19th century:



This went for around $6.000 all included in an auction here. There's nothing wrong or right (e.g. a signature) with it that's not visible in the photo. Well, it was actually bought from abroad on the strength of this photo. Any thoughts as to the value in America?

Any comments as to this? I'm really curious.
post #29 of 59
I love antiques, for both aesthetic and historical reasons. The house I, er, am growing up in, is full of them, so perhaps that's where I got my taste. Probably also influenced by my love of history.
post #30 of 59
I lived in an ranch house full of Gustave Stickley pieces.
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