or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › What are you reading?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What are you reading? - Page 363

post #5431 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

I preferred Clavell's Tai-Pan.

Clavell's whole Asian Saga is good......Currently listening to Noble House.
post #5432 of 5644



Read this book over a dozen times. very good read!
post #5433 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schizm View Post

Clavell's whole Asian Saga is good......Currently listening to Noble House.

Shogun has been on my ever expanding to-read list since I was like 15 back in 1994. This is the year I'll read that one. I need to do it next and finish before 12/31.



Also, re: Asimov's Foundation saga I'm reading now.....very good but Asimov's no Frank Herbert. Interesting aside, this series is apparently what inspired Newt Gingrich to get into politics.
post #5434 of 5644
Shogun is fucking long. It's going back in the line for me. A couple more books arrived in the mail for me today:

Frederick Forsyth - The Day of the Jackal
Robert Hughes - Barcelona

I've been meaning to read a cheap spy thriller, although I hear Jackal is better than that. I'm kind of excited to get into it.
post #5435 of 5644
Oh man, I liked Barcelona.
post #5436 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Shogun is fucking long. It's going back in the line for me. A couple more books arrived in the mail for me today:

Frederick Forsyth - The Day of the Jackal
Robert Hughes - Barcelona

I've been meaning to read a cheap spy thriller, although I hear Jackal is better than that. I'm kind of excited to get into it.

Fabulous book get in there!
post #5437 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I'm also looking for shorter modern novels, particularly ones that serve as good introductions to particular literary movements. European and Japanese, preferably.

Nadja and The Magnetic Fields are the ones that immediately jump out. Can't get more movement-y than the Surrealists, with their manifestos and fake earnestness. (Probably should be read in tandem with the manifestos and a viewing of Un Chien Andalou ).

That said, I always thought the proto-surrealists (really any authors they tried to retcon as their own -- Jarry, Roussel, Lautreamont, etc.) were always better. There are two anthologies I like a whole, whole lot that would seem to tie into your quest.... The Book of Masks and Breton's Anthology of Black Humor.

For a New Novel, by Alain Robbe-Grillet? Technichally essays, not fiction, but it probably spurred more of a movement than his novels. (Also I don't know which exact book would be most exemplary....) If you haven't read him, he's got some short stuff that should give you the general idea. There's also Nathalie Sarraute. Same movement. Short stuff in there somewhere.

Then there's always Oulipo. Raymond Queneau's Exercises in Style is just plain awesome, regardless of historical significance. I think Georges Perec's Life: A User's Manual is the most famous work, though it's pretty long....maybe 500 pages, depending.

Got Strong Opinions. Funny. Awesome. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
.

Edited by noob - 11/28/13 at 7:35am
post #5438 of 5644
I have lived 16 years in Hong Kong so Taipan and Noble House are special to me. Quite simplistic adventures but entertaining. I think Noble House will be more interesting for those who know Hong Kong a bit, Taipan can be enjoyed by anyone. Shogun is however Clavell's best adventure novel in my opinion. A must-read for anyone who likes adventures and is intrigued by Japanese culture.

The Taipan (named Struan in the book) is Jardine by the way. Jardine House on Hong Kong island was the tallest building in town back in the 1970s, distinguished by its large round windows. Because of the shape of the windows and the character of the people working inside the building, local people gave it a special name: "The house of a thousand assholes". Jardine Matheson were the best opium traders in the 19th century, another version of Pablo Escobar's Medellin outfit but more successful in the long run.

The Day of the Jackal is my all-time favourite among thrillers. I also loved The Odessa File and The Dogs of War. All Frederick Forsyth wrote after those three were awful. I don't understand what happened to him. Same can be said about another, albeit less excellent, thriller maestro. Robert Ludlum was very good in earlier books such as The Holcroft Covenant, The Matarese Circle, The Bourne Identity, The Chancellor Manuscript and The Osterman Weekend. He then turned into a poor imitation of himself.

One recent recommendation in this thread was Junichiro Tanizaki's Diary of a Mad Old Man. I whole-heatedly concur. Tanizaki is wonderful and this short novel was the first I read of him. It got me hooked. Another excellent short novel of his is Naomi. His masterpiece (much longer) is The Makioka Sisters. Essential reading for fans of Japanese culture and damn good literature (very far from Clavell/Forsyth/Ludlum).
post #5439 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post


The Day of the Jackal is my all-time favourite among thrillers. I also loved The Odessa File and The Dogs of War. All Frederick Forsyth wrote after those three were awful. I don't understand what happened to him.

Clockwise, good call. -+10 on the Forsyth three with Jackal top of that list. I very rarely re-read books and yet have read Jackal probably 5 times
post #5440 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob View Post



Nadja and The Magnetic Fields are the ones that immediately jump out. Can't get more movement-y than the Surrealists, with their manifestos and fake earnestness. (Probably should be read in tandem with the manifestos and a viewing of Un Chien Andalou ).

That said, I always thought the proto-surrealists (really any authors they tried to retcon as their own -- Jarry, Roussel, Lautreamont, etc.) were always better. There are two anthologies I like a whole, whole lot that would seem to tie into your quest.... The Book of Masks and Breton's Anthology of Black Humor.



Got Strong Opinions. Funny. Awesome. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
.

If you haven't read Blaise Cendrars Moravagine and Breton Froth on the Daydream both are brilliant surrealist novels worth reading

And waiting on Tatiana by Martin Cruz Smith to arrive been a big fan of the Arkady Renko books and recently found a first edition hardback of Gorky Park which I picked up for a $1 at a charity stall in excellent condition.
Edited by Geoffrey Firmin - 11/28/13 at 8:28pm
post #5441 of 5644
The Everything Store-Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon
post #5442 of 5644

Ginkgo: The Tree that Time Forgot, by Peter Crane

 

Fright, by Cornell Woolrich

 

Along with a crapload of graphic novels.

post #5443 of 5644
So I've tried reading Borges the last two nights. In short, I can't do it. I burn out after single digit pages. It's simply too much effort. Is there any supplemental source to bridge that divide easier? Reading praises bestowed onto him hasn't provided my enough faith or goodwill to tolerate the density and ambiguity.
post #5444 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

So I've tried reading Borges the last two nights. In short, I can't do it. I burn out after single digit pages. It's simply too much effort. Is there any supplemental source to bridge that divide easier? Reading praises bestowed onto him hasn't provided my enough faith or goodwill to tolerate the density and ambiguity.

He is an acquired taste.

Started reading Tatiana by Martin Curz Smith, actually read all the Arkady Renko books great combination of procedural, noir and angst. And good story telling.
post #5445 of 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

He is an acquired taste.

Started reading Tatiana by Martin Curz Smith, actually read all the Arkady Renko books great combination of procedural, noir and angst. And good story telling.

I like the Arkady Renko series, but haven't gotten to Tatiana yet. If you like those, you may like te Berlin Noir books, about a hardboiled detective working in Germany starting in Nazi Germany and moving to post-war Argentina.

Currently, I'm re-reading Ready Player One by Ernest Cline - fun sci-fi actioner about a contest in 2140-something based on 80s-90s pop culture.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Entertainment and Culture
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › What are you reading?