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What are you reading? - Page 362

post #5416 of 5738
Reports of how innovative or postmodern it was might have been overstated, but that's not her fault. I think she just set out to write a really engrossing narrative, and she did (and in a way that was very deft, but not showy at all). I liked it. Plus, that scene about the fisherman finally understanding the power of a crisp white shirt. lol8[1].gif
post #5417 of 5738
post #5418 of 5738
Decided it was time to read my first Stephen King book. I'm starting the Dark Tower series right now.
post #5419 of 5738
Let me know how it is. No matter how much I want to, I can't get into S King.
post #5420 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn View Post

Let me know how it is. No matter how much I want to, I can't get into S King.

I've heard from other people that don't particularly like Stephen King either that it's excellent, so we'll see.
post #5421 of 5738
I bought a bunch of books today. I'll dabble in each and see what sticks. If anybody has recommandations for books of essays, particularly strongly opinionated ones that aren't too dense, please shoot them my way. I've been going hard with Nabokov's Strong Opinions, which is an entertaining read.

Lionel Trilling - The Moral Obligation to Be Intelligent
Robert Hughes - Goya
Robert Hughes - Culture of Complaint
Joan Didion - Slouching Toward Bethlehem
Umberto Eco - How to Travel With A Salmon
James Clavell - Shogun
post #5422 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

If anybody has recommendations for books of essays, particularly strongly opinionated ones that aren't too dense, please shoot them my way.

Does Nabokov rail against the Freudians in that? Because that would be fun.

For light and opinionated, you might try Dale Peck's Hatchet Jobs, which includes his best essay, sort of a brief jeremiad against Rick Moody, Infinite Jest, postmodernism, pretty much any celebrated novel with long sentences. Then there's always James Wood, who's a bit more thorough and fair. I like his subdued rant against David Foster Wallace and 'hysterical realism', for one....though I can't recall what book that's in.

I also just picked up Roberto Bolano's Between Parentheses, and though I haven't read much, it looks promising. A collection of small-ish, mostly newspaper articles, I think, but just glancing through, he tackles some somewhat fresh authors (like one of my favorites, Jose Donoso) and reportedly pulls no punches.

I'd also love some recommendations for essays with an actual point of view. Sadly, they're a bit hard to find these days.
post #5423 of 5738
He shits on Freud at least three or four times in separate interviews. In fact, he shits on nearly everything. The only things you leave the book believing he appreciates are butterflies, America, Ulysses, and the nuance of Russian verb conjugations. Does he like Hemingway? No. Gogol? No. Portrait of the Artist? No. Dostoevsky? No. Tolstoy? No. Socialism? No. Police? No. Students? No. No. No. No. He's never boring though, and he apparently took long baths, which is very dignified. Him and why would have been great friends.
post #5424 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I bought a bunch of books today. I'll dabble in each and see what sticks. If anybody has recommandations for books of essays, particularly strongly opinionated ones that aren't too dense, please shoot them my way. I've been going hard with Nabokov's Strong Opinions, which is an entertaining read.

Lionel Trilling - The Moral Obligation to Be Intelligent
Robert Hughes - Goya
Robert Hughes - Culture of Complaint
Joan Didion - Slouching Toward Bethlehem
Umberto Eco - How to Travel With A Salmon
James Clavell - Shogun

Eco's essay on authenticity in How To Travel With A Salmon is great.
You might try picking up some prior year volumes (or this year's volume, of course) of the Best American Essays series. They can be hit-and-miss, but there are always at least a few strong selections.
post #5425 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

He shits on Freud at least three or four times in separate interviews. In fact, he shits on nearly everything. The only things you leave the book believing he appreciates are butterflies, America, Ulysses, and the nuance of Russian verb conjugations. Does he like Hemingway? No. Gogol? No. Portrait of the Artist? No. Dostoevsky? No. Tolstoy? No. Socialism? No. Police? No. Students? No. No. No. No. He's never boring though, and he apparently took long baths, which is very dignified. Him and why would have been great friends.

As I recall, he kind of liked E.B. White. And himself, quite a lot.
post #5426 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I bought a bunch of books today. I'll dabble in each and see what sticks. If anybody has recommandations for books of essays, particularly strongly opinionated ones that aren't too dense, please shoot them my way. I've been going hard with Nabokov's Strong Opinions, which is an entertaining read.

Lionel Trilling - The Moral Obligation to Be Intelligent
Robert Hughes - Goya
Robert Hughes - Culture of Complaint
Joan Didion - Slouching Toward Bethlehem
Umberto Eco - How to Travel With A Salmon
James Clavell - Shogun

I have that but have yet to dig in.
post #5427 of 5738
I'm also looking for shorter modern novels, particularly ones that serve as good introductions to particular literary movements. European and Japanese, preferably.
post #5428 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I'm also looking for shorter modern novels, particularly ones that serve as good introductions to particular literary movements. European and Japanese, preferably.
Semi-random suggestions (I'm assuming you're using "modern" to mean something like "written in the last century" as opposed to "written in the last ten years". If I'm wrong about that, my bad - most of these won't fit the bill):
Tanizaki, Diary of a Mad Old Man
Calvino, If On A Winter's Night A Traveler
Camus, The Stranger
Saramago, The Double
Crace, Being Dead
McEwen, Enduring Love
post #5429 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I bought a bunch of books today. I'll dabble in each and see what sticks. If anybody has recommandations for books of essays, particularly strongly opinionated ones that aren't too dense, please shoot them my way. I've been going hard with Nabokov's Strong Opinions, which is an entertaining read.

Lionel Trilling - The Moral Obligation to Be Intelligent
Robert Hughes - Goya
Robert Hughes - Culture of Complaint
Joan Didion - Slouching Toward Bethlehem
Umberto Eco - How to Travel With A Salmon
James Clavell - Shogun


I preferred Clavell's Tai-Pan.
post #5430 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

I preferred Clavell's Tai-Pan.

Clavell's whole Asian Saga is good......Currently listening to Noble House.
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