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What are you reading? - Page 347

post #5191 of 5745
The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

Six Years by Harlan Coben

Pronto, Riding the Rap, and When the Women Come Out to Dance by Elmore Leonard

Live by Night by Dennis Lehane
post #5192 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nil View Post

I'm alternating between Kazuo Ishiguro's "Never Let Me Go" and Austin Grossman's "Soon I Will Be Invincible."

I wound up reading "Never Let Me Go" in a couple of long reading sessions over the course of about 24 hours. It really hooked me. I have liked all of his books, though.
post #5193 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by VaderDave View Post

I wound up reading "Never Let Me Go" in a couple of long reading sessions over the course of about 24 hours. It really hooked me. I have liked all of his books, though.

Hmm. I enjoyed Remains of the Day, but hated Never Let Me Go.

But sometimes you just hit a book at the wrong time and it doesn't "take" the way it might if you were in a different frame of mind.
post #5194 of 5745
post #5195 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

Hmm. I enjoyed Remains of the Day, but hated Never Let Me Go.

But sometimes you just hit a book at the wrong time and it doesn't "take" the way it might if you were in a different frame of mind.

I've had that same thing happen with other books. I don't think I could read Ishiguro as a light summer read, for example. But for whatever reason, it was the right book at the right 24-hour time for me. I've never read it again, though.
post #5196 of 5745
The River War by Winston Churchill.

Some of the best prose I've ever read, particularly the first few chapters.

Free on Kindle.


http://www.amazon.com/River-Account-Reconquest-Sudan-ebook/dp/B0084A08XW/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1370052841&sr=1-2&keywords=the+river+war
post #5197 of 5745
An English Affair Sex, Class and Power in the Age of Profumo by Richard Davenport-Hines
post #5198 of 5745
I picked up "Mr. Midshipman Hornblower" by C.S. Forester last night on a whim and I've been enthralled with it. I'll have to run to the bookstore tomorrow and pick up "Lieutenant Hornblower" at the rate I'm going.
post #5199 of 5745
My dad is a big fan of those books. They whole genre sounded dorky to me when I was a kid but I liked Master and Commander so maybe I should check those out.
post #5200 of 5745
Anyone interested in social history of the past 50 or so years would find a An English Affair enlightening and entertaining. The change in social morality and norms that you realise which have occurred since the 50's & 60's is both eye opening and hilarious. For example if you introduced a mate to a a tart who was older than 16 but under 21 and they shagged you could be charged with a criminal offence for procurement in Britain this law enacted in the 50's was not taken off the books till the late 90's and as for the BMA and homosexuals. Mind you the author reached for his thesaurus once too often but its a very eye opening and entertaining read. Above all its shows that for all their taste and character the Poms a were (still) a race of hypocritical class conscious wankers.
post #5201 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchausen View Post

My dad is a big fan of those books. They whole genre sounded dorky to me when I was a kid but I liked Master and Commander so maybe I should check those out.

I felt very much the same prior to picking the first one up. But Napoleonic War sailing adventures aren't all that different from the dorky space opera scifi I already read on occasion. Be prepared to bone up on your sailing terms though, Forester certainly doesn't skimp on the technical jargon. Thankfully I sailed a bit in college, so I managed to make sense of most of it without consulting google.
post #5202 of 5745
Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, by Sean Howe. For the comic geeks of a certain age, you have to read it. I'm about 2/3 through it and to read how childish the staff was and how much dope they were smoking in the 70s. Stan Lee comes off as part carnival barker, part inattentive dad, part creative genius, and narcissistic.
post #5203 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai View Post

The River War by Winston Churchill.

Some of the best prose I've ever read, particularly the first few chapters.

Free on Kindle.


http://www.amazon.com/River-Account-Reconquest-Sudan-ebook/dp/B0084A08XW/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1370052841&sr=1-2&keywords=the+river+war

So weird that I just acquired this the other day, as well as all 4 volumes of his History of English Speaking Peoples in epub format.
post #5204 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by life_interrupts View Post

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, by Sean Howe. For the comic geeks of a certain age, you have to read it. I'm about 2/3 through it and to read how childish the staff was and how much dope they were smoking in the 70s. Stan Lee comes off as part carnival barker, part inattentive dad, part creative genius, and narcissistic.

Read this a while back loved it, great book. Tragic at the end though what happens to Marvel as its turned into just a machine for making money. The late 60's and 70's is my favourite period in the Marvel epoch the art and story writing was first rate.
post #5205 of 5745

I was recommended Never Let Me Go by a friend who claimed it was their favorite book. I like Kazuo but hated this book honestly. Extremely slow to develop with almost no climax and a weak ending. Pretty disappointed. 

 

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