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What are you reading? - Page 308

post #4606 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

Another SF writer with literary pretensions worth mentioning is Samuel Delany. He's of the school of post-modern experimental narrative, using science fiction and sword and sorcery tropes, not unlike Borges and Cortazar, and just as readable as those two. Exploration of gender roles is a major theme in his work (and his own life).

Dhalgren is pretty great.

Using a loose definition of sci-fi, here are some good ones:
Blueprints of the Afterlife by Ryan Boudinot
Neuromancer by William Gibson (most of his stuff is pretty great, but this is the fan fav I guess)
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (again, most is great)
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Drowned World by J.G. Ballard (most of his work could fit, but this is one of the more explicitly sci-fi)
Wild Seed by Octavia E. Butler
Embassytown by China Mieville
Weby Evgenii Ivanovich Zamiatin
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell (strictly speaking, it's only sci-fi in parts, really, but it's quite good)
The Automatic Detective by A. Lee Martinez
Edited by dwyhajlo - 5/1/12 at 8:01pm
post #4607 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwyhajlo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

Another SF writer with literary pretensions worth mentioning is Samuel Delany. He's of the school of post-modern experimental narrative, using science fiction and sword and sorcery tropes, not unlike Borges and Cortazar, and just as readable as those two. Exploration of gender roles is a major theme in his work (and his own life).

Dhalgren is pretty great.

Using a loose definition of sci-fi, here are some good ones:
Blueprints of the Afterlife by Ryan Boudinot
Neuromancer by William Gibson (most of his stuff is pretty great, but this is the fan fav I guess)
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (again, most is great)
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Drowned World by J.G. Ballard (most of his work could fit, but this is one of the more explicitly sci-fi)
Wild Seed by Octavia E. Butler
Embassytown by China Mieville
Weby Evgenii Ivanovich Zamiatin
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell (strictly speaking, it's only sci-fi in parts, really, but it's quite good)
The Automatic Detective by A. Lee Martinez

Great list, I'm not familiar with Boudinot or Martinez, and I'll check those out.

I don't tend to recommend either Philip Dick or Gibson to literature snobs, they're both too far towards the pulpy end of the spectrum.

I'll add a rec for Stanislaw Lem's The Futurological Congress for good measure.
post #4608 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

Great list, I'm not familiar with Boudinot or Martinez, and I'll check those out.
I don't tend to recommend either Philip Dick or Gibson to literature snobs, they're both too far towards the pulpy end of the spectrum.
I'll add a rec for Stanislaw Lem's The Futurological Congress for good measure.

That Martinez book is about as far away from hard sci-fi as you can get.

Do you really find that people who are into "serious" fiction find Dick and Gibson difficult to get into because of their pulpy elements? I've always felt that at least the well-known tropes that those two writers use can at least provide handholds for novices to navigate their way into the world of science fiction. Conversely, serious, stone-faced "hard" sci-fi is probably more intimidating more difficult to get into for people who aren't used to it, because a lot of it tends to be very insular. Not only that, but I would think that serious readers would be able to appreciate the digest of philosophical and cultural ideas in Dick and Gibson, because, as Gibson would say "science fiction is about the present" (or at least the good stuff).
I dunno, maybe I'm talking out of my butt here.

Lem is also great. I can't believe I forgot to include him. Incidentally, if you're interested in more strange Polish fiction, you should check out Bruno Schulz's The Street of Crocodiles.

Also, from Wikipedia:
"Lem singled out only one American SF writer for praise, Philip K. Dick—see the 1986 English-language anthology of his critical essays, Microworlds. Dick, however, considered Lem to be a composite committee operating on orders of the Communist party to gain control over public opinion, and wrote a letter to the FBI to that effect."
post #4609 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwyhajlo View Post

The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury

hadn't read any Bradbury in a long time and about six months ago I found that in my piles of unread books... quite enjoyed it. smile.gif
post #4610 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwyhajlo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

Great list, I'm not familiar with Boudinot or Martinez, and I'll check those out.
I don't tend to recommend either Philip Dick or Gibson to literature snobs, they're both too far towards the pulpy end of the spectrum.
I'll add a rec for Stanislaw Lem's The Futurological Congress for good measure.

That Martinez book is about as far away from hard sci-fi as you can get.

Do you really find that people who are into "serious" fiction find Dick and Gibson difficult to get into because of their pulpy elements? I've always felt that at least the well-known tropes that those two writers use can at least provide handholds for novices to navigate their way into the world of science fiction. Conversely, serious, stone-faced "hard" sci-fi is probably more intimidating more difficult to get into for people who aren't used to it, because a lot of it tends to be very insular. Not only that, but I would think that serious readers would be able to appreciate the digest of philosophical and cultural ideas in Dick and Gibson, because, as Gibson would say "science fiction is about the present" (or at least the good stuff).
I dunno, maybe I'm talking out of my butt here.

Lem is also great. I can't believe I forgot to include him. Incidentally, if you're interested in more strange Polish fiction, you should check out Bruno Schulz's The Street of Crocodiles.

Also, from Wikipedia:
"Lem singled out only one American SF writer for praise, Philip K. Dick—see the 1986 English-language anthology of his critical essays, Microworlds. Dick, however, considered Lem to be a composite committee operating on orders of the Communist party to gain control over public opinion, and wrote a letter to the FBI to that effect."

That quote is hysterical. It's almost too perfect to be true.

It has been my experience that it is precisely the tropes of hard sci if that tend to turn off the literati, so I tried to select from among the writers of what some prefer to call speculative fiction or literary science fiction in my recommendations, or the ones, like Delany, who use turn those tropes inside out in innovative ways.
post #4611 of 5738
300

I heard this was the best English translation since I don't read Arabic. Figure it will give me a better understanding of current events. I wanted something as close to the original as possible, I always thought modern versions of religious books like "The Torah in modern words" or "What Jesus was really saying" were lame. I want to extract my own meaning from the original texts, not the new authors.
post #4612 of 5738
More Faulkner - Go Down Moses - heard it is a toughy.
Its funny, I feel like it takes about to novels in a row with an author before I make a breakthrough and can read an author without too much difficulty. After "Barn Burning," "A Rose for Emily," The Sound and The Fury (2nd time through) and As I Lay Dying I feel much more adjusted to his style. At the end of As I Lay Dying I was reading without feeling Aggravated.
I remember when I had a breakthrough with Shakespeare, which was actually after reading Dr. Faustus, and read Macbeth and Richard III with minimal irritation. I just hope to make a similar breakthrough with Joyce one day . . . . I am happy to be becoming a much more competent reader of difficult literature - I feel like the fruits of my liberal arts education are paying off. Now I just need to learn to write. . . .
post #4613 of 5738

i like to stick the intellectual stuff...like the sharpie writings on the public bathroom stall

post #4614 of 5738

One Hundred Years of Solitude.

post #4615 of 5738
Just bought Peace, They Say A History of the Nobel Peace Prize by Jay Nordlinger
post #4616 of 5738

Thinking Fast and Slow.

post #4617 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Just bought Peace, They Say A History of the Nobel Peace Prize by Jay Nordlinger

Imma be buying that next.

For now...

12888599.jpg
post #4618 of 5738
The Great Gatsby of Fitzgerald...

Reading american classic.
post #4619 of 5738
Yeah so I am getting my copy of the lifeboat back today but in the meantime I picked up where I left off with "Lenin's Tomb". Man is it good as shit, albeit dense as hell. Definitely a book I can only read in piecemeal.
post #4620 of 5738
finished jo nesbo "phantom"
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
RIP Harry Hole

starting cogan's trade.
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